Driftwood artists dismantle 'Toronto' sign in Humber Bay Park East

WhatsOn Dec 06, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Mother Nature has claimed the wildly popular lakefront “Toronto” sign made of driftwood that attracted thousands of followers since summer and became an Instagram and Facebook phenomenon.

Wet, windy and wintry fall weather in recent weeks battered the sign that two Toronto artists created out of six-foot tall driftwood letters, installed on a quay of boulders in Humber Bay Park East in Etobicoke.

Of late, only one O and the N remained.

Junction artist Thelia Sanders Shelton and York graphic designer Julie Ryan built the rustic ode to The Six in June. On Sunday, they returned to dismantle what remained of their sign after repairing it a few times.

“Thelia was very sad,” Ryan said of her friend’s reaction. “We knew it was going to happen. I thought it was something really neat. I was exhilarated that Mother Nature was taking back her stuff.”

Earlier, the pair had dismantled some loose letters and stashed them in bushes because it was dark.

“When we came back with tools the next day, people had carried the letters back out and tried to put them up,” Ryan said. “We were both really touched.”

It all began with a “150” driftwood sign the artists created to mark Canada’s sesquicentennial. It, too, drew crowds.

The Humber Bay community of more than 20,000 area condominium residents quickly embraced the art projects and the artists.

In mid-September, approximately 30 Humber Bay Shores residents braved a blazing sun and blistering heat for the official unveiling of the two Toronto artists’ latest public art installation on the east Etobicoke waterfront.

El Corazon, which means ‘the heart’ in Spanish, is the artists’ driftwood sculpture of a long, lean, reclining, 25-foot androgynous figure bathing, installed on large, craggy boulders before the Toronto skyline.

Sanders Shelton and Ryan deliberately animated the sculpture to be reclining, with its legs out in front and its arms supporting its torso, because they suspected people would sit on it to take photos.

People did.

El Corazon also became a social media darling, boosted in large part by regular postings on the now 1,700-member and growing Humber Bay Shores Discussion Facebook page.

El Corazon remains standing.

The artists used sheet metal to shore up the strength of the sculpture’s neck, head and torso. Atop a wood frame, they drilled deck screws into the lengths of driftwood to secure it.

The community’s heart for the artists and their work on the shoreline is what compelled the women to challenge themselves to create the 3D sculpture, they said.

“What makes this community so fabulous is its people; so many of you took us into your hearts,” Ryan told the crowd of supporters at El Corazon’s unveiling in September.

“It’s heartwarming, touching, life-changing. You should all be very happy with who you are and where you are.”

Currently, the pair are guest artists in the Waterfront BIA’s Ice Breakers 2018 exhibit of five winter art installations, which runs from Jan. 19 to Feb. 25 on Queens Quay West between York Street and Spadina Avenue.

Visit www.gofundme.com/shoreland-arts-public-toronto-art to help Ryan and Sanders Shelton create more art for Toronto.


Driftwood artists dismantle 'Toronto' sign in Humber Bay Park East

Windy, wet weather wreaked havoc on Instagram phenomenon

WhatsOn Dec 06, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Mother Nature has claimed the wildly popular lakefront “Toronto” sign made of driftwood that attracted thousands of followers since summer and became an Instagram and Facebook phenomenon.

Wet, windy and wintry fall weather in recent weeks battered the sign that two Toronto artists created out of six-foot tall driftwood letters, installed on a quay of boulders in Humber Bay Park East in Etobicoke.

Of late, only one O and the N remained.

Junction artist Thelia Sanders Shelton and York graphic designer Julie Ryan built the rustic ode to The Six in June. On Sunday, they returned to dismantle what remained of their sign after repairing it a few times.

Related Content

“Thelia was very sad,” Ryan said of her friend’s reaction. “We knew it was going to happen. I thought it was something really neat. I was exhilarated that Mother Nature was taking back her stuff.”

Earlier, the pair had dismantled some loose letters and stashed them in bushes because it was dark.

“When we came back with tools the next day, people had carried the letters back out and tried to put them up,” Ryan said. “We were both really touched.”

It all began with a “150” driftwood sign the artists created to mark Canada’s sesquicentennial. It, too, drew crowds.

The Humber Bay community of more than 20,000 area condominium residents quickly embraced the art projects and the artists.

In mid-September, approximately 30 Humber Bay Shores residents braved a blazing sun and blistering heat for the official unveiling of the two Toronto artists’ latest public art installation on the east Etobicoke waterfront.

El Corazon, which means ‘the heart’ in Spanish, is the artists’ driftwood sculpture of a long, lean, reclining, 25-foot androgynous figure bathing, installed on large, craggy boulders before the Toronto skyline.

Sanders Shelton and Ryan deliberately animated the sculpture to be reclining, with its legs out in front and its arms supporting its torso, because they suspected people would sit on it to take photos.

People did.

El Corazon also became a social media darling, boosted in large part by regular postings on the now 1,700-member and growing Humber Bay Shores Discussion Facebook page.

El Corazon remains standing.

The artists used sheet metal to shore up the strength of the sculpture’s neck, head and torso. Atop a wood frame, they drilled deck screws into the lengths of driftwood to secure it.

The community’s heart for the artists and their work on the shoreline is what compelled the women to challenge themselves to create the 3D sculpture, they said.

“What makes this community so fabulous is its people; so many of you took us into your hearts,” Ryan told the crowd of supporters at El Corazon’s unveiling in September.

“It’s heartwarming, touching, life-changing. You should all be very happy with who you are and where you are.”

Currently, the pair are guest artists in the Waterfront BIA’s Ice Breakers 2018 exhibit of five winter art installations, which runs from Jan. 19 to Feb. 25 on Queens Quay West between York Street and Spadina Avenue.

Visit www.gofundme.com/shoreland-arts-public-toronto-art to help Ryan and Sanders Shelton create more art for Toronto.


Driftwood artists dismantle 'Toronto' sign in Humber Bay Park East

Windy, wet weather wreaked havoc on Instagram phenomenon

WhatsOn Dec 06, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Mother Nature has claimed the wildly popular lakefront “Toronto” sign made of driftwood that attracted thousands of followers since summer and became an Instagram and Facebook phenomenon.

Wet, windy and wintry fall weather in recent weeks battered the sign that two Toronto artists created out of six-foot tall driftwood letters, installed on a quay of boulders in Humber Bay Park East in Etobicoke.

Of late, only one O and the N remained.

Junction artist Thelia Sanders Shelton and York graphic designer Julie Ryan built the rustic ode to The Six in June. On Sunday, they returned to dismantle what remained of their sign after repairing it a few times.

Related Content

“Thelia was very sad,” Ryan said of her friend’s reaction. “We knew it was going to happen. I thought it was something really neat. I was exhilarated that Mother Nature was taking back her stuff.”

Earlier, the pair had dismantled some loose letters and stashed them in bushes because it was dark.

“When we came back with tools the next day, people had carried the letters back out and tried to put them up,” Ryan said. “We were both really touched.”

It all began with a “150” driftwood sign the artists created to mark Canada’s sesquicentennial. It, too, drew crowds.

The Humber Bay community of more than 20,000 area condominium residents quickly embraced the art projects and the artists.

In mid-September, approximately 30 Humber Bay Shores residents braved a blazing sun and blistering heat for the official unveiling of the two Toronto artists’ latest public art installation on the east Etobicoke waterfront.

El Corazon, which means ‘the heart’ in Spanish, is the artists’ driftwood sculpture of a long, lean, reclining, 25-foot androgynous figure bathing, installed on large, craggy boulders before the Toronto skyline.

Sanders Shelton and Ryan deliberately animated the sculpture to be reclining, with its legs out in front and its arms supporting its torso, because they suspected people would sit on it to take photos.

People did.

El Corazon also became a social media darling, boosted in large part by regular postings on the now 1,700-member and growing Humber Bay Shores Discussion Facebook page.

El Corazon remains standing.

The artists used sheet metal to shore up the strength of the sculpture’s neck, head and torso. Atop a wood frame, they drilled deck screws into the lengths of driftwood to secure it.

The community’s heart for the artists and their work on the shoreline is what compelled the women to challenge themselves to create the 3D sculpture, they said.

“What makes this community so fabulous is its people; so many of you took us into your hearts,” Ryan told the crowd of supporters at El Corazon’s unveiling in September.

“It’s heartwarming, touching, life-changing. You should all be very happy with who you are and where you are.”

Currently, the pair are guest artists in the Waterfront BIA’s Ice Breakers 2018 exhibit of five winter art installations, which runs from Jan. 19 to Feb. 25 on Queens Quay West between York Street and Spadina Avenue.

Visit www.gofundme.com/shoreland-arts-public-toronto-art to help Ryan and Sanders Shelton create more art for Toronto.