THEATRE REVIEW: Maggie’s Getting Married portrays ‘beautiful snapshot’ of family dynamics

WhatsOn May 01, 2015 by Maria Tzavaras Bloor West Villager

The main goal of any wedding is to try and make it as memorable and happy as possible for the bride, groom, and their friends and family.

However, in the Village Players’ final show of the season, Maggie’s Getting Married by Canadian funny man Norm Foster, we get a glimpse at some real feelings that prelude the big day, and they are not all joyous and rosy like we are always led to believe.

Set entirely in the kitchen of the Duncan family home the night before Maggie Duncan’s (Emma Borsa) wedding to Russell (Mark Brombacher), everyone has gathered there after the rehearsal dinner for one last celebration before the big day.

We first meet Maggie and her older sister Wanda (Loriel Medynski), who has come from out of town for the wedding, and they are catching up as sisters do. However, it’s clear the two could not be more different in personality, which has played a significant role in their pasts.

While Maggie is smart, cute and reserved, Wanda is outgoing, witty and beautiful, and throughout their lives Maggie has always felt overshadowed by her sister’s big personality and sparkling looks. To enhance that fact, Wanda has stolen the few boyfriends Maggie ever had.

Nonetheless, the two girls are close, despite Maggie half-jokingly telling Wanda that she does not want her to meet her groom, who is running late because of work. Joke or not, it is clear there is some hesitation among the optimism.

With the party going on just outside the kitchen, we soon meet their mother Cass (Gloria Lambert), and their dad, Tom (Morris Jacobs), who are coming in and out to refresh drinks and food, and check in with their kids, who they notice are chatting.

Eventually, the kitchen becomes the hub where everyone takes their turn having interactions, and through different sets of conversations, we are privy to some funny and honest talks that reveal insights on how everyone is really feeling about the big day.

Mom is thrilled about the upcoming union having practically set up the two, but she is not so thrilled about Axel (Dan Bowers), who she calls Wanda’s “boyfriend du jour,” an actor who is set to star in the adult version of Peter Pan.

We hear Maggie’s feeling towards her sister about some of the hurts in their past, and dad Tom comes to give Maggie the “I can give you an out” talk, has she any reservations about marrying a guy she has only known for seven months.

While weddings are about two people who are about to gain a life together, in reality, it also offers reflection to what some have lost and the changes that will occur for others. Tom and Cass reflect on their marriage, the realities of getting older, and the uncertainty that lies ahead.

Amongst all the funny and deep conversation, the groom finally shows up, and to Wanda’s shock and horror it is not the first time she has met Russell. This presents a situation that threatens to ruin Maggie’s happiness yet again at Wanda’s hand.

This show contains some funny and witty dialogue which ranges from silly to shocking, touching and sentimental, and everything in between. It is a beautiful snapshot of family relationships and dynamics.

Director David Eden does an amazing job choosing cast members who are not only talented but who each bring something individual to the show and the story. Rarely is there a cast which portrays characters that are equally likeable and entertaining.

They all have some moments of funny interactions and great onstage chemistry. This show is the right balance of funny and realistic, with relatable characters and a realistic storyline.

Maggie’s Getting Married runs until May 16, 8 p.m., at The Village Playhouse, 2190E Bloor Street West. Tickets are $22 and can be purchased by calling 416-767-7702 or by visiting www.villageplayers.net

THEATRE REVIEW: Maggie’s Getting Married portrays ‘beautiful snapshot’ of family dynamics

WhatsOn May 01, 2015 by Maria Tzavaras Bloor West Villager

The main goal of any wedding is to try and make it as memorable and happy as possible for the bride, groom, and their friends and family.

However, in the Village Players’ final show of the season, Maggie’s Getting Married by Canadian funny man Norm Foster, we get a glimpse at some real feelings that prelude the big day, and they are not all joyous and rosy like we are always led to believe.

Set entirely in the kitchen of the Duncan family home the night before Maggie Duncan’s (Emma Borsa) wedding to Russell (Mark Brombacher), everyone has gathered there after the rehearsal dinner for one last celebration before the big day.

We first meet Maggie and her older sister Wanda (Loriel Medynski), who has come from out of town for the wedding, and they are catching up as sisters do. However, it’s clear the two could not be more different in personality, which has played a significant role in their pasts.

While Maggie is smart, cute and reserved, Wanda is outgoing, witty and beautiful, and throughout their lives Maggie has always felt overshadowed by her sister’s big personality and sparkling looks. To enhance that fact, Wanda has stolen the few boyfriends Maggie ever had.

Nonetheless, the two girls are close, despite Maggie half-jokingly telling Wanda that she does not want her to meet her groom, who is running late because of work. Joke or not, it is clear there is some hesitation among the optimism.

With the party going on just outside the kitchen, we soon meet their mother Cass (Gloria Lambert), and their dad, Tom (Morris Jacobs), who are coming in and out to refresh drinks and food, and check in with their kids, who they notice are chatting.

Eventually, the kitchen becomes the hub where everyone takes their turn having interactions, and through different sets of conversations, we are privy to some funny and honest talks that reveal insights on how everyone is really feeling about the big day.

Mom is thrilled about the upcoming union having practically set up the two, but she is not so thrilled about Axel (Dan Bowers), who she calls Wanda’s “boyfriend du jour,” an actor who is set to star in the adult version of Peter Pan.

We hear Maggie’s feeling towards her sister about some of the hurts in their past, and dad Tom comes to give Maggie the “I can give you an out” talk, has she any reservations about marrying a guy she has only known for seven months.

While weddings are about two people who are about to gain a life together, in reality, it also offers reflection to what some have lost and the changes that will occur for others. Tom and Cass reflect on their marriage, the realities of getting older, and the uncertainty that lies ahead.

Amongst all the funny and deep conversation, the groom finally shows up, and to Wanda’s shock and horror it is not the first time she has met Russell. This presents a situation that threatens to ruin Maggie’s happiness yet again at Wanda’s hand.

This show contains some funny and witty dialogue which ranges from silly to shocking, touching and sentimental, and everything in between. It is a beautiful snapshot of family relationships and dynamics.

Director David Eden does an amazing job choosing cast members who are not only talented but who each bring something individual to the show and the story. Rarely is there a cast which portrays characters that are equally likeable and entertaining.

They all have some moments of funny interactions and great onstage chemistry. This show is the right balance of funny and realistic, with relatable characters and a realistic storyline.

Maggie’s Getting Married runs until May 16, 8 p.m., at The Village Playhouse, 2190E Bloor Street West. Tickets are $22 and can be purchased by calling 416-767-7702 or by visiting www.villageplayers.net

THEATRE REVIEW: Maggie’s Getting Married portrays ‘beautiful snapshot’ of family dynamics

WhatsOn May 01, 2015 by Maria Tzavaras Bloor West Villager

The main goal of any wedding is to try and make it as memorable and happy as possible for the bride, groom, and their friends and family.

However, in the Village Players’ final show of the season, Maggie’s Getting Married by Canadian funny man Norm Foster, we get a glimpse at some real feelings that prelude the big day, and they are not all joyous and rosy like we are always led to believe.

Set entirely in the kitchen of the Duncan family home the night before Maggie Duncan’s (Emma Borsa) wedding to Russell (Mark Brombacher), everyone has gathered there after the rehearsal dinner for one last celebration before the big day.

We first meet Maggie and her older sister Wanda (Loriel Medynski), who has come from out of town for the wedding, and they are catching up as sisters do. However, it’s clear the two could not be more different in personality, which has played a significant role in their pasts.

While Maggie is smart, cute and reserved, Wanda is outgoing, witty and beautiful, and throughout their lives Maggie has always felt overshadowed by her sister’s big personality and sparkling looks. To enhance that fact, Wanda has stolen the few boyfriends Maggie ever had.

Nonetheless, the two girls are close, despite Maggie half-jokingly telling Wanda that she does not want her to meet her groom, who is running late because of work. Joke or not, it is clear there is some hesitation among the optimism.

With the party going on just outside the kitchen, we soon meet their mother Cass (Gloria Lambert), and their dad, Tom (Morris Jacobs), who are coming in and out to refresh drinks and food, and check in with their kids, who they notice are chatting.

Eventually, the kitchen becomes the hub where everyone takes their turn having interactions, and through different sets of conversations, we are privy to some funny and honest talks that reveal insights on how everyone is really feeling about the big day.

Mom is thrilled about the upcoming union having practically set up the two, but she is not so thrilled about Axel (Dan Bowers), who she calls Wanda’s “boyfriend du jour,” an actor who is set to star in the adult version of Peter Pan.

We hear Maggie’s feeling towards her sister about some of the hurts in their past, and dad Tom comes to give Maggie the “I can give you an out” talk, has she any reservations about marrying a guy she has only known for seven months.

While weddings are about two people who are about to gain a life together, in reality, it also offers reflection to what some have lost and the changes that will occur for others. Tom and Cass reflect on their marriage, the realities of getting older, and the uncertainty that lies ahead.

Amongst all the funny and deep conversation, the groom finally shows up, and to Wanda’s shock and horror it is not the first time she has met Russell. This presents a situation that threatens to ruin Maggie’s happiness yet again at Wanda’s hand.

This show contains some funny and witty dialogue which ranges from silly to shocking, touching and sentimental, and everything in between. It is a beautiful snapshot of family relationships and dynamics.

Director David Eden does an amazing job choosing cast members who are not only talented but who each bring something individual to the show and the story. Rarely is there a cast which portrays characters that are equally likeable and entertaining.

They all have some moments of funny interactions and great onstage chemistry. This show is the right balance of funny and realistic, with relatable characters and a realistic storyline.

Maggie’s Getting Married runs until May 16, 8 p.m., at The Village Playhouse, 2190E Bloor Street West. Tickets are $22 and can be purchased by calling 416-767-7702 or by visiting www.villageplayers.net