How many birthdays will your car’s tires celebrate?

Sponsored content Sep 01, 2016 Etobicoke Guardian

The experts at Morton Motors Inc. in Etobicoke would like you to know that in so many ways, the lifespan of a quality tire is similar to that of a roofing shingle. Okay, so let’s be clear about that. When buying new shingles for a roof, they are generally sold with a “suggested” lifespan attached. But, much like roofs, the actual length of time that a tire will last is dependent on many variables and circumstances.

Actual tire life will ultimately depend on the tires’ service conditions and the environment in which they operate. Some vehicle manufacturers recommend that tires be replaced every six years, regardless of use. In addition, a number of tire manufacturers cite 10 years as the maximum service life for tires. Rule of thumb? Check the owner’s manual for specific recommendations for your vehicle. Remember, it is always wise to err on the side of caution if you suspect your vehicle has tires that are over six years of age.

To be clear, it is possible and relatively easy to determine the age of any tire. While Transport Canada does not regulate the age, shelf life or even the useful life of tires, they do, however, require the date of manufacture to be moulded on the side wall of every tire. Every side wall tells a story. Look for a four-digit number on the side wall of every tire — and never assume that all four tires (five, if you count the spare) are identical. The first two digits are the week it was made; the last two are the year. So, the number 1714 means the tire was made the 17th week of 2014.

Tires — specifically, the rubber compound — do degrade over time. Besides the more obvious degradation through use, under-inflation or over-inflation, overloading your vehicle, climate, road hazards, improper maintenance, structural defects and improper installation, tire aging is something to be aware of. Even if your tires are used only occasionally, or they’re just sitting in the garage under cover, their structural integrity may be weakened over time, even though plenty of obvious tread remains. They may look completely fine on first inspection, but may need to be checked and possibly replaced.

You’ll find a wide selection of new, name brand tires and gently used ones available from Morton Motors Inc., located at 39 Chauncey Avenue in Etobicoke. Call 416-234-0061 today. Check them out on Facebook.

How many birthdays will your car’s tires celebrate?

Sponsored content Sep 01, 2016 Etobicoke Guardian

The experts at Morton Motors Inc. in Etobicoke would like you to know that in so many ways, the lifespan of a quality tire is similar to that of a roofing shingle. Okay, so let’s be clear about that. When buying new shingles for a roof, they are generally sold with a “suggested” lifespan attached. But, much like roofs, the actual length of time that a tire will last is dependent on many variables and circumstances.

Actual tire life will ultimately depend on the tires’ service conditions and the environment in which they operate. Some vehicle manufacturers recommend that tires be replaced every six years, regardless of use. In addition, a number of tire manufacturers cite 10 years as the maximum service life for tires. Rule of thumb? Check the owner’s manual for specific recommendations for your vehicle. Remember, it is always wise to err on the side of caution if you suspect your vehicle has tires that are over six years of age.

To be clear, it is possible and relatively easy to determine the age of any tire. While Transport Canada does not regulate the age, shelf life or even the useful life of tires, they do, however, require the date of manufacture to be moulded on the side wall of every tire. Every side wall tells a story. Look for a four-digit number on the side wall of every tire — and never assume that all four tires (five, if you count the spare) are identical. The first two digits are the week it was made; the last two are the year. So, the number 1714 means the tire was made the 17th week of 2014.

Tires — specifically, the rubber compound — do degrade over time. Besides the more obvious degradation through use, under-inflation or over-inflation, overloading your vehicle, climate, road hazards, improper maintenance, structural defects and improper installation, tire aging is something to be aware of. Even if your tires are used only occasionally, or they’re just sitting in the garage under cover, their structural integrity may be weakened over time, even though plenty of obvious tread remains. They may look completely fine on first inspection, but may need to be checked and possibly replaced.

Related Content

You’ll find a wide selection of new, name brand tires and gently used ones available from Morton Motors Inc., located at 39 Chauncey Avenue in Etobicoke. Call 416-234-0061 today. Check them out on Facebook.

How many birthdays will your car’s tires celebrate?

Sponsored content Sep 01, 2016 Etobicoke Guardian

The experts at Morton Motors Inc. in Etobicoke would like you to know that in so many ways, the lifespan of a quality tire is similar to that of a roofing shingle. Okay, so let’s be clear about that. When buying new shingles for a roof, they are generally sold with a “suggested” lifespan attached. But, much like roofs, the actual length of time that a tire will last is dependent on many variables and circumstances.

Actual tire life will ultimately depend on the tires’ service conditions and the environment in which they operate. Some vehicle manufacturers recommend that tires be replaced every six years, regardless of use. In addition, a number of tire manufacturers cite 10 years as the maximum service life for tires. Rule of thumb? Check the owner’s manual for specific recommendations for your vehicle. Remember, it is always wise to err on the side of caution if you suspect your vehicle has tires that are over six years of age.

To be clear, it is possible and relatively easy to determine the age of any tire. While Transport Canada does not regulate the age, shelf life or even the useful life of tires, they do, however, require the date of manufacture to be moulded on the side wall of every tire. Every side wall tells a story. Look for a four-digit number on the side wall of every tire — and never assume that all four tires (five, if you count the spare) are identical. The first two digits are the week it was made; the last two are the year. So, the number 1714 means the tire was made the 17th week of 2014.

Tires — specifically, the rubber compound — do degrade over time. Besides the more obvious degradation through use, under-inflation or over-inflation, overloading your vehicle, climate, road hazards, improper maintenance, structural defects and improper installation, tire aging is something to be aware of. Even if your tires are used only occasionally, or they’re just sitting in the garage under cover, their structural integrity may be weakened over time, even though plenty of obvious tread remains. They may look completely fine on first inspection, but may need to be checked and possibly replaced.

Related Content

You’ll find a wide selection of new, name brand tires and gently used ones available from Morton Motors Inc., located at 39 Chauncey Avenue in Etobicoke. Call 416-234-0061 today. Check them out on Facebook.