Transit in Toronto would get boost under Patrick Brown

Opinion Dec 07, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

Patrick Brown’s election platform has put the ‘Progressive’ back in Conservative, and Toronto and Ontario stands to benefit from what now should be a hotly contested provincial election next year.

There was nothing ‘Progressive’ about the Progressive Conservative (PC) party the last time it held power under former premier Mike Harris for two majority governments.

Harris was a disruptor before the term was popular, downloading social services and public housing; slashing subsidies to the TTC; halting Eglinton subway construction; privatizing Highway 407; and then, without any forewarning during an election campaign, amalgamating Toronto and other municipalities.

The Liberals have held power ever since, and are seeking their fifth term.

Meanwhile, in that time in Toronto, the PCs have only won a combined two seats – both coming in byelections.

Brown didn’t show any progressive inclinations serving as a backbencher for all three terms of the Stephen Harper federal Conservative government, nor for his successful run for the provincial PC leadership, but give him credit. His election platform eschews Harper or Harris, borrowing more from the template of a previous leader of the PCs – John Tory, now Toronto mayor.

Several of his platform promises piggyback on Trudeau government initiatives, such as matching the federal government’s “10-year, $1.9 billion commitment to mental health” and “(opting) in to the federal carbon pricing benchmark…”

And while there’s the requisite barbs targeted at the Kathleen Wynne provincial government, there’s actually a line or two of praise, one of them for “committing to build 100,000 licensed child care spaces.”

Other Liberal initiatives that wouldn’t be axed include their major pharmacare program which will provide free medication to youth aged 24 and under, and major transit projects already under construction, including the Finch West LRT.

His transit plans for Toronto are ambitious. He promises to take on the city’s billion-dollar-plus share of the proposed Scarborough subway extension, if the city puts money towards extending the Eglinton Crosstown project to Scarborough’s UofT campus.

He promises the province will cover the capital costs of building and maintaining of the subway system, and Toronto would remain the operator.

It’s great to have the PCs back in the game. The ball is now in the court of the provincial Liberals and NDP. We anxiously wait to hear what they can offer Toronto and the province in their own election platforms.

Transit in Toronto would get boost under Patrick Brown

What does the Progressive Conservative leader bring to Toronto, asks this week's editorial

Opinion Dec 07, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

Patrick Brown’s election platform has put the ‘Progressive’ back in Conservative, and Toronto and Ontario stands to benefit from what now should be a hotly contested provincial election next year.

There was nothing ‘Progressive’ about the Progressive Conservative (PC) party the last time it held power under former premier Mike Harris for two majority governments.

Harris was a disruptor before the term was popular, downloading social services and public housing; slashing subsidies to the TTC; halting Eglinton subway construction; privatizing Highway 407; and then, without any forewarning during an election campaign, amalgamating Toronto and other municipalities.

The Liberals have held power ever since, and are seeking their fifth term.

Meanwhile, in that time in Toronto, the PCs have only won a combined two seats – both coming in byelections.

Brown didn’t show any progressive inclinations serving as a backbencher for all three terms of the Stephen Harper federal Conservative government, nor for his successful run for the provincial PC leadership, but give him credit. His election platform eschews Harper or Harris, borrowing more from the template of a previous leader of the PCs – John Tory, now Toronto mayor.

Several of his platform promises piggyback on Trudeau government initiatives, such as matching the federal government’s “10-year, $1.9 billion commitment to mental health” and “(opting) in to the federal carbon pricing benchmark…”

And while there’s the requisite barbs targeted at the Kathleen Wynne provincial government, there’s actually a line or two of praise, one of them for “committing to build 100,000 licensed child care spaces.”

Other Liberal initiatives that wouldn’t be axed include their major pharmacare program which will provide free medication to youth aged 24 and under, and major transit projects already under construction, including the Finch West LRT.

His transit plans for Toronto are ambitious. He promises to take on the city’s billion-dollar-plus share of the proposed Scarborough subway extension, if the city puts money towards extending the Eglinton Crosstown project to Scarborough’s UofT campus.

He promises the province will cover the capital costs of building and maintaining of the subway system, and Toronto would remain the operator.

It’s great to have the PCs back in the game. The ball is now in the court of the provincial Liberals and NDP. We anxiously wait to hear what they can offer Toronto and the province in their own election platforms.

Transit in Toronto would get boost under Patrick Brown

What does the Progressive Conservative leader bring to Toronto, asks this week's editorial

Opinion Dec 07, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

Patrick Brown’s election platform has put the ‘Progressive’ back in Conservative, and Toronto and Ontario stands to benefit from what now should be a hotly contested provincial election next year.

There was nothing ‘Progressive’ about the Progressive Conservative (PC) party the last time it held power under former premier Mike Harris for two majority governments.

Harris was a disruptor before the term was popular, downloading social services and public housing; slashing subsidies to the TTC; halting Eglinton subway construction; privatizing Highway 407; and then, without any forewarning during an election campaign, amalgamating Toronto and other municipalities.

The Liberals have held power ever since, and are seeking their fifth term.

Meanwhile, in that time in Toronto, the PCs have only won a combined two seats – both coming in byelections.

Brown didn’t show any progressive inclinations serving as a backbencher for all three terms of the Stephen Harper federal Conservative government, nor for his successful run for the provincial PC leadership, but give him credit. His election platform eschews Harper or Harris, borrowing more from the template of a previous leader of the PCs – John Tory, now Toronto mayor.

Several of his platform promises piggyback on Trudeau government initiatives, such as matching the federal government’s “10-year, $1.9 billion commitment to mental health” and “(opting) in to the federal carbon pricing benchmark…”

And while there’s the requisite barbs targeted at the Kathleen Wynne provincial government, there’s actually a line or two of praise, one of them for “committing to build 100,000 licensed child care spaces.”

Other Liberal initiatives that wouldn’t be axed include their major pharmacare program which will provide free medication to youth aged 24 and under, and major transit projects already under construction, including the Finch West LRT.

His transit plans for Toronto are ambitious. He promises to take on the city’s billion-dollar-plus share of the proposed Scarborough subway extension, if the city puts money towards extending the Eglinton Crosstown project to Scarborough’s UofT campus.

He promises the province will cover the capital costs of building and maintaining of the subway system, and Toronto would remain the operator.

It’s great to have the PCs back in the game. The ball is now in the court of the provincial Liberals and NDP. We anxiously wait to hear what they can offer Toronto and the province in their own election platforms.