Patrick Brown casts a politically amorous eye to Scarborough

Opinion Dec 07, 2017 by David Nickle Scarborough Mirror

It may have been Toronto City Hall where Patrick Brown arrived to shake hands with Mayor John Tory last week, but it seemed as though the Progressive Conservative leader was casting his eyes decidedly eastward.

Eastward, as in east of Victoria Park Avenue, which is to say, eastward to the former municipality of Scarborough. Brown spoke kindly of the former municipality, and even came bearing substantial gifts.

Scarborough would be the biggest 416-area beneficiary of Brown's signature platform promise, released the previous weekend as the PC party revealed the shape of its 2018 campaign platform: subways.

Brown has promised that the Scarborough subway, all one stop of it, would be funded, at whatever the cost ends up being, by the provincial government. On top of that, there would be $5 billion to build more subways, in a system that the province would technically own but the city would operate. 

Among those subways would be not only the Scarborough subway, but the one under Sheppard Avenue East that the late former mayor Rob Ford promised but could not deliver. 

There are six provincial ridings in Scarborough, and going in to the 2018 provincial election, Brown needs to hold on to one of them and might hopefully take the other five. 

He might, indeed, hope to take more than the six Scarborough ridings: but nowhere is there so clear a path to it as in Scarborough. 

Whichever way you look at it, Scarborough been ill-served for transit for decades, starting in the early 1980s when the Bill Davis government opened the toy train set that is the Scarborough RT. It has been promised subways, light rail and subways again, and seen none of it — until now, when council has approved a single stop subway to replace the RT, and a light rail plan on Eglinton it can barely afford.

Brown's plan offers to fulfil all that historic promise — bankrolled by a provincial government with substantial spending and borrowing clout. 

It is a match made in heaven: voters, in need of a seat on a train, and a provincial party, in desperate need of seats, period.

David Nickle is a reporter and columnist covering Toronto City Hall for Torstar. Email dnickle@insidetoronto.com, and follow him on Twitter @davidnickle and Facebook @InsideToronto.

Patrick Brown casts a politically amorous eye to Scarborough

Ontario PC leader courts Scarborough with transit talk, writes David Nickle

Opinion Dec 07, 2017 by David Nickle Scarborough Mirror

It may have been Toronto City Hall where Patrick Brown arrived to shake hands with Mayor John Tory last week, but it seemed as though the Progressive Conservative leader was casting his eyes decidedly eastward.

Eastward, as in east of Victoria Park Avenue, which is to say, eastward to the former municipality of Scarborough. Brown spoke kindly of the former municipality, and even came bearing substantial gifts.

Scarborough would be the biggest 416-area beneficiary of Brown's signature platform promise, released the previous weekend as the PC party revealed the shape of its 2018 campaign platform: subways.

Brown has promised that the Scarborough subway, all one stop of it, would be funded, at whatever the cost ends up being, by the provincial government. On top of that, there would be $5 billion to build more subways, in a system that the province would technically own but the city would operate. 

Among those subways would be not only the Scarborough subway, but the one under Sheppard Avenue East that the late former mayor Rob Ford promised but could not deliver. 

There are six provincial ridings in Scarborough, and going in to the 2018 provincial election, Brown needs to hold on to one of them and might hopefully take the other five. 

He might, indeed, hope to take more than the six Scarborough ridings: but nowhere is there so clear a path to it as in Scarborough. 

Whichever way you look at it, Scarborough been ill-served for transit for decades, starting in the early 1980s when the Bill Davis government opened the toy train set that is the Scarborough RT. It has been promised subways, light rail and subways again, and seen none of it — until now, when council has approved a single stop subway to replace the RT, and a light rail plan on Eglinton it can barely afford.

Brown's plan offers to fulfil all that historic promise — bankrolled by a provincial government with substantial spending and borrowing clout. 

It is a match made in heaven: voters, in need of a seat on a train, and a provincial party, in desperate need of seats, period.

David Nickle is a reporter and columnist covering Toronto City Hall for Torstar. Email dnickle@insidetoronto.com, and follow him on Twitter @davidnickle and Facebook @InsideToronto.

Patrick Brown casts a politically amorous eye to Scarborough

Ontario PC leader courts Scarborough with transit talk, writes David Nickle

Opinion Dec 07, 2017 by David Nickle Scarborough Mirror

It may have been Toronto City Hall where Patrick Brown arrived to shake hands with Mayor John Tory last week, but it seemed as though the Progressive Conservative leader was casting his eyes decidedly eastward.

Eastward, as in east of Victoria Park Avenue, which is to say, eastward to the former municipality of Scarborough. Brown spoke kindly of the former municipality, and even came bearing substantial gifts.

Scarborough would be the biggest 416-area beneficiary of Brown's signature platform promise, released the previous weekend as the PC party revealed the shape of its 2018 campaign platform: subways.

Brown has promised that the Scarborough subway, all one stop of it, would be funded, at whatever the cost ends up being, by the provincial government. On top of that, there would be $5 billion to build more subways, in a system that the province would technically own but the city would operate. 

Among those subways would be not only the Scarborough subway, but the one under Sheppard Avenue East that the late former mayor Rob Ford promised but could not deliver. 

There are six provincial ridings in Scarborough, and going in to the 2018 provincial election, Brown needs to hold on to one of them and might hopefully take the other five. 

He might, indeed, hope to take more than the six Scarborough ridings: but nowhere is there so clear a path to it as in Scarborough. 

Whichever way you look at it, Scarborough been ill-served for transit for decades, starting in the early 1980s when the Bill Davis government opened the toy train set that is the Scarborough RT. It has been promised subways, light rail and subways again, and seen none of it — until now, when council has approved a single stop subway to replace the RT, and a light rail plan on Eglinton it can barely afford.

Brown's plan offers to fulfil all that historic promise — bankrolled by a provincial government with substantial spending and borrowing clout. 

It is a match made in heaven: voters, in need of a seat on a train, and a provincial party, in desperate need of seats, period.

David Nickle is a reporter and columnist covering Toronto City Hall for Torstar. Email dnickle@insidetoronto.com, and follow him on Twitter @davidnickle and Facebook @InsideToronto.