Former TTC worker concerned for brothers, sisters still in harm's way

Opinion Oct 11, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

To the editor:

Re: TTC worker dies of injuries sustained in workplace accident, Oct. 9.

After two major deaths among TTC workers due to job site accidents (Peter Pavolvski in 2012 and recently Peter Dedes) it’s my concern as a retired 31-year member of the TTC workforce not enough is being done to prevent tragedies such as these.

In 2007 after the workplace death of TTC worker Tony Almeida, the TTC hired a consulting firm named Behavioral Science Technology (BST) from the United States to help change the culture of safety within the TTC. Myself being part of the steering committee for one of the Controlling Accidents by Removing Exposures (C.A.R.E.) teams, we were educated and taught this methodology to introduce a new system of safety into the TTC’s working environment.

In the first year alone, there was a significant decrease in workplace injuries. From 2008 to 2011 the reduction in injuries were well on their way to a 60 per cent decrease.

Unfortunately, although the hope was to carry on with the BST formula after their three-year contract was up with yearly oversight by this remarkable company (BST was hired by NASA after the Challenger disaster and is still a client of theirs) the association was discontinued and the TTC continues to use only a Joint Health and Safety Committee (JHSC) as required by law, which is made up of management and worker representatives.

My concerns for my fellow and former brothers and sisters in the workplace is self-evident.

Daniel Kowbell, Mississauga

Former TTC worker concerned for brothers, sisters still in harm's way

Opinion Oct 11, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

To the editor:

Re: TTC worker dies of injuries sustained in workplace accident, Oct. 9.

After two major deaths among TTC workers due to job site accidents (Peter Pavolvski in 2012 and recently Peter Dedes) it’s my concern as a retired 31-year member of the TTC workforce not enough is being done to prevent tragedies such as these.

In 2007 after the workplace death of TTC worker Tony Almeida, the TTC hired a consulting firm named Behavioral Science Technology (BST) from the United States to help change the culture of safety within the TTC. Myself being part of the steering committee for one of the Controlling Accidents by Removing Exposures (C.A.R.E.) teams, we were educated and taught this methodology to introduce a new system of safety into the TTC’s working environment.

In the first year alone, there was a significant decrease in workplace injuries. From 2008 to 2011 the reduction in injuries were well on their way to a 60 per cent decrease.

Unfortunately, although the hope was to carry on with the BST formula after their three-year contract was up with yearly oversight by this remarkable company (BST was hired by NASA after the Challenger disaster and is still a client of theirs) the association was discontinued and the TTC continues to use only a Joint Health and Safety Committee (JHSC) as required by law, which is made up of management and worker representatives.

My concerns for my fellow and former brothers and sisters in the workplace is self-evident.

Daniel Kowbell, Mississauga

Former TTC worker concerned for brothers, sisters still in harm's way

Opinion Oct 11, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

To the editor:

Re: TTC worker dies of injuries sustained in workplace accident, Oct. 9.

After two major deaths among TTC workers due to job site accidents (Peter Pavolvski in 2012 and recently Peter Dedes) it’s my concern as a retired 31-year member of the TTC workforce not enough is being done to prevent tragedies such as these.

In 2007 after the workplace death of TTC worker Tony Almeida, the TTC hired a consulting firm named Behavioral Science Technology (BST) from the United States to help change the culture of safety within the TTC. Myself being part of the steering committee for one of the Controlling Accidents by Removing Exposures (C.A.R.E.) teams, we were educated and taught this methodology to introduce a new system of safety into the TTC’s working environment.

In the first year alone, there was a significant decrease in workplace injuries. From 2008 to 2011 the reduction in injuries were well on their way to a 60 per cent decrease.

Unfortunately, although the hope was to carry on with the BST formula after their three-year contract was up with yearly oversight by this remarkable company (BST was hired by NASA after the Challenger disaster and is still a client of theirs) the association was discontinued and the TTC continues to use only a Joint Health and Safety Committee (JHSC) as required by law, which is made up of management and worker representatives.

My concerns for my fellow and former brothers and sisters in the workplace is self-evident.

Daniel Kowbell, Mississauga