THE CITY: It may be long before we get over Toronto's amalgamation

Opinion Oct 12, 2017 by David Nickle East York Mirror

It has been a long time since amalgamated Toronto's first day – nearly 20 years – and there are no doubt some who think it's time we got over it.

Pity those poor forward-thinking cynics. Last week at Toronto council's October meeting, Janet Davis rose to remind us that ... well ... that perhaps we need reminding. The Beaches-East York councillor was sponsoring a request from the East York Historical Society and the East York Foundation to please include the East York logo on any street signs that might be replaced.

Of all the former municipalities, Davis reminded her colleagues, East York was “special.” There was a lot of heckling from councillors who noted properly that their former municipalities were special too. But Davis has a point.

East York, it could be argued, was at once the least and the greatest of the former Metropolitan Toronto municipalities. It was geographically small; small enough that it couldn't support even a single enclosed shopping mall, small enough that it didn't even get to be a city – it was a borough.

But as signs at its irregular borders indicated, it was “Canada's Only Borough.” Its citizens were fiercely proud of it. When it came time to vote in illegal, Catalan-style referenda about amalgamation, East Yorkers voted 'no' in greater numbers, and if anyone had been measuring it, surely greater volume.

When it failed, the borough's mayor, Michael Prue, went on to be a councillor on Mayor Mel Lastman's first Toronto Council. And he wore East York sweaters, hand-knitted by his wife.

The tradition continues, Davis told her colleagues. Skateboarders come at night to paint the East York logo on local skateboard parks. Teenagers, she insists, have the 'EY' acronym tattooed on their flesh. The former borough's senior citizens long for the sight of the old EY. Spending about $1,000 a year to put EY on street signs as they're being replaced was the least that council could do.

As it turns out, no. Council finally settled on something much larger, and overwhelmingly supported a motion from Toronto-Danforth Councillor Mary Fragedakis to blow the bank and stick up signs across all six former municipalities. 

Clearly, we are not over it at all.


THE CITY: It may be long before we get over Toronto's amalgamation

Opinion Oct 12, 2017 by David Nickle East York Mirror

It has been a long time since amalgamated Toronto's first day – nearly 20 years – and there are no doubt some who think it's time we got over it.

Pity those poor forward-thinking cynics. Last week at Toronto council's October meeting, Janet Davis rose to remind us that ... well ... that perhaps we need reminding. The Beaches-East York councillor was sponsoring a request from the East York Historical Society and the East York Foundation to please include the East York logo on any street signs that might be replaced.

Of all the former municipalities, Davis reminded her colleagues, East York was “special.” There was a lot of heckling from councillors who noted properly that their former municipalities were special too. But Davis has a point.

East York, it could be argued, was at once the least and the greatest of the former Metropolitan Toronto municipalities. It was geographically small; small enough that it couldn't support even a single enclosed shopping mall, small enough that it didn't even get to be a city – it was a borough.

But as signs at its irregular borders indicated, it was “Canada's Only Borough.” Its citizens were fiercely proud of it. When it came time to vote in illegal, Catalan-style referenda about amalgamation, East Yorkers voted 'no' in greater numbers, and if anyone had been measuring it, surely greater volume.

When it failed, the borough's mayor, Michael Prue, went on to be a councillor on Mayor Mel Lastman's first Toronto Council. And he wore East York sweaters, hand-knitted by his wife.

The tradition continues, Davis told her colleagues. Skateboarders come at night to paint the East York logo on local skateboard parks. Teenagers, she insists, have the 'EY' acronym tattooed on their flesh. The former borough's senior citizens long for the sight of the old EY. Spending about $1,000 a year to put EY on street signs as they're being replaced was the least that council could do.

As it turns out, no. Council finally settled on something much larger, and overwhelmingly supported a motion from Toronto-Danforth Councillor Mary Fragedakis to blow the bank and stick up signs across all six former municipalities. 

Clearly, we are not over it at all.


THE CITY: It may be long before we get over Toronto's amalgamation

Opinion Oct 12, 2017 by David Nickle East York Mirror

It has been a long time since amalgamated Toronto's first day – nearly 20 years – and there are no doubt some who think it's time we got over it.

Pity those poor forward-thinking cynics. Last week at Toronto council's October meeting, Janet Davis rose to remind us that ... well ... that perhaps we need reminding. The Beaches-East York councillor was sponsoring a request from the East York Historical Society and the East York Foundation to please include the East York logo on any street signs that might be replaced.

Of all the former municipalities, Davis reminded her colleagues, East York was “special.” There was a lot of heckling from councillors who noted properly that their former municipalities were special too. But Davis has a point.

East York, it could be argued, was at once the least and the greatest of the former Metropolitan Toronto municipalities. It was geographically small; small enough that it couldn't support even a single enclosed shopping mall, small enough that it didn't even get to be a city – it was a borough.

But as signs at its irregular borders indicated, it was “Canada's Only Borough.” Its citizens were fiercely proud of it. When it came time to vote in illegal, Catalan-style referenda about amalgamation, East Yorkers voted 'no' in greater numbers, and if anyone had been measuring it, surely greater volume.

When it failed, the borough's mayor, Michael Prue, went on to be a councillor on Mayor Mel Lastman's first Toronto Council. And he wore East York sweaters, hand-knitted by his wife.

The tradition continues, Davis told her colleagues. Skateboarders come at night to paint the East York logo on local skateboard parks. Teenagers, she insists, have the 'EY' acronym tattooed on their flesh. The former borough's senior citizens long for the sight of the old EY. Spending about $1,000 a year to put EY on street signs as they're being replaced was the least that council could do.

As it turns out, no. Council finally settled on something much larger, and overwhelmingly supported a motion from Toronto-Danforth Councillor Mary Fragedakis to blow the bank and stick up signs across all six former municipalities. 

Clearly, we are not over it at all.