Plans for narrower Yonge Street go to committee Monday

News Jan 14, 2018 by David Nickle North York Mirror

Yonge Street in North York could be in for a top-to-bottom makeover, with wider sidewalks, outdoor cafes, protected bike lanes and a wider median.

On Friday, Jan. 19, the city's Public Works and Infrastructure Committee will be discussing the possibilities for Yonge between Sheppard and Finch Avenues, as it debates the just-released planning report, REimagining Yonge.

The report, released on Jan. 12, is a blueprint for transforming one of the most congested arteries in Toronto – the “downtown” that the old North York council and its mayor Mel Lastman helped create nearly three decades ago.

Then, the old city had planned that North York Centre would be a downtown to rival the old City of Toronto's, with office development concentrated near Sheppard Avenue and condominium development just a few blocks north toward Finch Avenue West.

But local Willowdale Coun. John Filion said in a news release supporting the plan that the neighbourhood that's resulted needs more attention.

“Downtown North York should be more than a sea of high-rises with six lanes of highway down the middle,” he said. “This area has been neglected for far too long. The city needs to invest in creating a beautiful main street that connects the buildings and the people who live in them.”

The transformation put forward by planning staff offers that attention, but at a cost: the roadway along Yonge Street would be reduced from six lanes to just four lanes between Sheppard Avenue and Bishop-Hendon Avenues north of Finch Avenue.

The report also considers a request from Toronto's public works and infrastructure committee, to look at ways of keeping traffic lanes as-is on Yonge Street, and moving cycling facilities on Doris Avenue and/or Beecroft Road, which run parallel to Yonge east and west.

After studying the second option, staff rejected it, noting that it would both be more expensive and not fulfill the objectives as effectively.

The recommended option would cost an estimated $51.1 million. It would involve widening sidewalks,improving pedestrian crossings, widening the median, and greening the street with additional trees.

Editor's Note: In a previous version of this article, the report was incorrectly identified as going to the Planning and Growth Management Committee. It is in fact going to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, Jan. 19.

Plans for a narrower pedestrian-friendly Yonge Street go to committee

News Jan 14, 2018 by David Nickle North York Mirror

Yonge Street in North York could be in for a top-to-bottom makeover, with wider sidewalks, outdoor cafes, protected bike lanes and a wider median.

On Friday, Jan. 19, the city's Public Works and Infrastructure Committee will be discussing the possibilities for Yonge between Sheppard and Finch Avenues, as it debates the just-released planning report, REimagining Yonge.

The report, released on Jan. 12, is a blueprint for transforming one of the most congested arteries in Toronto – the “downtown” that the old North York council and its mayor Mel Lastman helped create nearly three decades ago.

Then, the old city had planned that North York Centre would be a downtown to rival the old City of Toronto's, with office development concentrated near Sheppard Avenue and condominium development just a few blocks north toward Finch Avenue West.

But local Willowdale Coun. John Filion said in a news release supporting the plan that the neighbourhood that's resulted needs more attention.

“Downtown North York should be more than a sea of high-rises with six lanes of highway down the middle,” he said. “This area has been neglected for far too long. The city needs to invest in creating a beautiful main street that connects the buildings and the people who live in them.”

The transformation put forward by planning staff offers that attention, but at a cost: the roadway along Yonge Street would be reduced from six lanes to just four lanes between Sheppard Avenue and Bishop-Hendon Avenues north of Finch Avenue.

The report also considers a request from Toronto's public works and infrastructure committee, to look at ways of keeping traffic lanes as-is on Yonge Street, and moving cycling facilities on Doris Avenue and/or Beecroft Road, which run parallel to Yonge east and west.

After studying the second option, staff rejected it, noting that it would both be more expensive and not fulfill the objectives as effectively.

The recommended option would cost an estimated $51.1 million. It would involve widening sidewalks,improving pedestrian crossings, widening the median, and greening the street with additional trees.

Editor's Note: In a previous version of this article, the report was incorrectly identified as going to the Planning and Growth Management Committee. It is in fact going to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, Jan. 19.

Plans for a narrower pedestrian-friendly Yonge Street go to committee

News Jan 14, 2018 by David Nickle North York Mirror

Yonge Street in North York could be in for a top-to-bottom makeover, with wider sidewalks, outdoor cafes, protected bike lanes and a wider median.

On Friday, Jan. 19, the city's Public Works and Infrastructure Committee will be discussing the possibilities for Yonge between Sheppard and Finch Avenues, as it debates the just-released planning report, REimagining Yonge.

The report, released on Jan. 12, is a blueprint for transforming one of the most congested arteries in Toronto – the “downtown” that the old North York council and its mayor Mel Lastman helped create nearly three decades ago.

Then, the old city had planned that North York Centre would be a downtown to rival the old City of Toronto's, with office development concentrated near Sheppard Avenue and condominium development just a few blocks north toward Finch Avenue West.

But local Willowdale Coun. John Filion said in a news release supporting the plan that the neighbourhood that's resulted needs more attention.

“Downtown North York should be more than a sea of high-rises with six lanes of highway down the middle,” he said. “This area has been neglected for far too long. The city needs to invest in creating a beautiful main street that connects the buildings and the people who live in them.”

The transformation put forward by planning staff offers that attention, but at a cost: the roadway along Yonge Street would be reduced from six lanes to just four lanes between Sheppard Avenue and Bishop-Hendon Avenues north of Finch Avenue.

The report also considers a request from Toronto's public works and infrastructure committee, to look at ways of keeping traffic lanes as-is on Yonge Street, and moving cycling facilities on Doris Avenue and/or Beecroft Road, which run parallel to Yonge east and west.

After studying the second option, staff rejected it, noting that it would both be more expensive and not fulfill the objectives as effectively.

The recommended option would cost an estimated $51.1 million. It would involve widening sidewalks,improving pedestrian crossings, widening the median, and greening the street with additional trees.

Editor's Note: In a previous version of this article, the report was incorrectly identified as going to the Planning and Growth Management Committee. It is in fact going to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, Jan. 19.