COLD CASE: Police believe they know who killed Barrie's Katherine Janeiro

News Jan 07, 2018 by Rick Vanderlinde Barrie Advance

It was a mild Sunday night on Oct. 9, 1994, when Katherine Janeiro was partying at bars in downtown Barrie.

Only 20 years old, the single mother of one was found dead in her basement apartment at 258 Dunlop St. W. less than 24 hours later.

She had been stabbed multiple times.

As the city police service’s criminal investigation team probed the circumstances surrounding the violent death, they learned Janeiro had invited some people she met downtown back to her apartment.

That decision may have been the fatal mistake that led to her death.

In an Unsolved episode aired by Barrie’s AChannel in 2010, Det. Mike Winn said Janeiro was entwined in the drug trade and the motive for her murder was likely robbery.

During their initial investigation, officers discovered Janeiro’s home telephone had been ripped from the wall and was nowhere to be found. The theory was the killer got rid of the phone because their number might be locked in the memory system.

One month after the murder, police believed they got a big break when they found the telephone in a nearby creek. The memory system was intact, but the discovery brought detectives no closer to solving the city’s most notorious homicide in years.

“The investigation changed at that point,” Winn said in the 2010 television interview.  “We started looking at evidence that was within the crime scene itself.”

With the help of the OPP identification bureau, exhibits gathered from the crime scene were sent to the Centre for Forensic Sciences in Toronto as well as to a private lab.

After an exhaustive five-year investigation, the case was turned over to the OPP in October 1999 to use an investigative technique that was beyond the scope of Barrie police at that time.

Unfortunately, the technique did not bring police any closer to pursuing a prime suspect.

Winn said police had six suspects they believed were either responsible for the murder or had information that would lead to the killer.

“I feel that it’s only a matter of time and one day we will be knocking on their door,” he said in 2010.

With the OPP’s forensic techniques exhausted, the investigation was turned back over to Barrie police in February 2012.

About two years later, Barrie police Det. Rob Gravel made a startling public statement: “I know his identity, we have been keeping close tabs on the suspect. I feel confident that we’re very close.”

Soon after, on Oct. 15, 2014, Barrie police held a news conference with Janeiro’s adult daughter, Dawn Nelson, who gave a heart-wrenching account of growing up without her mother.

She was only 2 ½ years old at the time of the homicide.

Nelson told reporters that when she was six years old she was flipping through channels at her grandparents home, where she was living. She came across a Crime Stoppers re-enactment of a young women being stabbed in her apartment.

“As young as I was, I still remember being terrified and sad for this woman and sad for her family. Moments later a picture of the woman holding her child was put on the screen and I realized at that moment that that was my mother. I knew because this is the same picture that was in my living room to this day. I have never been able to get rid of the hurt and confusion that flooded my mind that night.”  

Nelson said her mother had always been a straight-A student until high school, when her curiosity led her astray.

“She had her whole life ahead of her to make better decisions for herself and especially for me — but that was stolen from us.”

Nelson, who is now 25, told reporters her grandparents were “torn apart” as they battled depression over the death of their daughter while caring for their toddler granddaughter.

“They are in a better place right now reunited with my mother, but it was a tough way to get there,” she said. “Now I stand alone, holding on to the hope that there will be justice in my mother’s case. I hope to one day have closure to what has caused me so much pain.”

One year after Nelson’s statement, there was still no arrest when Gravel told local media that police were still aware of two male suspects in the case.

Investigators have sought the opinion of experts in various investigative and scientific fields, including DNA analysis and DNA mixtures, both here in Canada and the United States, the Barrie police website states.

But while science has been able to eliminate suspects in this unsolved mystery, it has yet to provide enough evidence to bring a suspect to court.

As in many unsolved homicides, investigators hope a witness will still come forward with that key piece of missing evidence.

Anyone with information on this homicide is urged to call the Barrie Police Homicide Unit tip line at 705-725-7025 ext. 2160, or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS).

COLD CASE: Police believe they know who killed Barrie's Katherine Janeiro

News Jan 07, 2018 by Rick Vanderlinde Barrie Advance

It was a mild Sunday night on Oct. 9, 1994, when Katherine Janeiro was partying at bars in downtown Barrie.

Only 20 years old, the single mother of one was found dead in her basement apartment at 258 Dunlop St. W. less than 24 hours later.

She had been stabbed multiple times.

As the city police service’s criminal investigation team probed the circumstances surrounding the violent death, they learned Janeiro had invited some people she met downtown back to her apartment.

Related Content

That decision may have been the fatal mistake that led to her death.

In an Unsolved episode aired by Barrie’s AChannel in 2010, Det. Mike Winn said Janeiro was entwined in the drug trade and the motive for her murder was likely robbery.

During their initial investigation, officers discovered Janeiro’s home telephone had been ripped from the wall and was nowhere to be found. The theory was the killer got rid of the phone because their number might be locked in the memory system.

One month after the murder, police believed they got a big break when they found the telephone in a nearby creek. The memory system was intact, but the discovery brought detectives no closer to solving the city’s most notorious homicide in years.

“The investigation changed at that point,” Winn said in the 2010 television interview.  “We started looking at evidence that was within the crime scene itself.”

With the help of the OPP identification bureau, exhibits gathered from the crime scene were sent to the Centre for Forensic Sciences in Toronto as well as to a private lab.

After an exhaustive five-year investigation, the case was turned over to the OPP in October 1999 to use an investigative technique that was beyond the scope of Barrie police at that time.

Unfortunately, the technique did not bring police any closer to pursuing a prime suspect.

Winn said police had six suspects they believed were either responsible for the murder or had information that would lead to the killer.

“I feel that it’s only a matter of time and one day we will be knocking on their door,” he said in 2010.

With the OPP’s forensic techniques exhausted, the investigation was turned back over to Barrie police in February 2012.

About two years later, Barrie police Det. Rob Gravel made a startling public statement: “I know his identity, we have been keeping close tabs on the suspect. I feel confident that we’re very close.”

Soon after, on Oct. 15, 2014, Barrie police held a news conference with Janeiro’s adult daughter, Dawn Nelson, who gave a heart-wrenching account of growing up without her mother.

She was only 2 ½ years old at the time of the homicide.

Nelson told reporters that when she was six years old she was flipping through channels at her grandparents home, where she was living. She came across a Crime Stoppers re-enactment of a young women being stabbed in her apartment.

“As young as I was, I still remember being terrified and sad for this woman and sad for her family. Moments later a picture of the woman holding her child was put on the screen and I realized at that moment that that was my mother. I knew because this is the same picture that was in my living room to this day. I have never been able to get rid of the hurt and confusion that flooded my mind that night.”  

Nelson said her mother had always been a straight-A student until high school, when her curiosity led her astray.

“She had her whole life ahead of her to make better decisions for herself and especially for me — but that was stolen from us.”

Nelson, who is now 25, told reporters her grandparents were “torn apart” as they battled depression over the death of their daughter while caring for their toddler granddaughter.

“They are in a better place right now reunited with my mother, but it was a tough way to get there,” she said. “Now I stand alone, holding on to the hope that there will be justice in my mother’s case. I hope to one day have closure to what has caused me so much pain.”

One year after Nelson’s statement, there was still no arrest when Gravel told local media that police were still aware of two male suspects in the case.

Investigators have sought the opinion of experts in various investigative and scientific fields, including DNA analysis and DNA mixtures, both here in Canada and the United States, the Barrie police website states.

But while science has been able to eliminate suspects in this unsolved mystery, it has yet to provide enough evidence to bring a suspect to court.

As in many unsolved homicides, investigators hope a witness will still come forward with that key piece of missing evidence.

Anyone with information on this homicide is urged to call the Barrie Police Homicide Unit tip line at 705-725-7025 ext. 2160, or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS).

COLD CASE: Police believe they know who killed Barrie's Katherine Janeiro

News Jan 07, 2018 by Rick Vanderlinde Barrie Advance

It was a mild Sunday night on Oct. 9, 1994, when Katherine Janeiro was partying at bars in downtown Barrie.

Only 20 years old, the single mother of one was found dead in her basement apartment at 258 Dunlop St. W. less than 24 hours later.

She had been stabbed multiple times.

As the city police service’s criminal investigation team probed the circumstances surrounding the violent death, they learned Janeiro had invited some people she met downtown back to her apartment.

Related Content

That decision may have been the fatal mistake that led to her death.

In an Unsolved episode aired by Barrie’s AChannel in 2010, Det. Mike Winn said Janeiro was entwined in the drug trade and the motive for her murder was likely robbery.

During their initial investigation, officers discovered Janeiro’s home telephone had been ripped from the wall and was nowhere to be found. The theory was the killer got rid of the phone because their number might be locked in the memory system.

One month after the murder, police believed they got a big break when they found the telephone in a nearby creek. The memory system was intact, but the discovery brought detectives no closer to solving the city’s most notorious homicide in years.

“The investigation changed at that point,” Winn said in the 2010 television interview.  “We started looking at evidence that was within the crime scene itself.”

With the help of the OPP identification bureau, exhibits gathered from the crime scene were sent to the Centre for Forensic Sciences in Toronto as well as to a private lab.

After an exhaustive five-year investigation, the case was turned over to the OPP in October 1999 to use an investigative technique that was beyond the scope of Barrie police at that time.

Unfortunately, the technique did not bring police any closer to pursuing a prime suspect.

Winn said police had six suspects they believed were either responsible for the murder or had information that would lead to the killer.

“I feel that it’s only a matter of time and one day we will be knocking on their door,” he said in 2010.

With the OPP’s forensic techniques exhausted, the investigation was turned back over to Barrie police in February 2012.

About two years later, Barrie police Det. Rob Gravel made a startling public statement: “I know his identity, we have been keeping close tabs on the suspect. I feel confident that we’re very close.”

Soon after, on Oct. 15, 2014, Barrie police held a news conference with Janeiro’s adult daughter, Dawn Nelson, who gave a heart-wrenching account of growing up without her mother.

She was only 2 ½ years old at the time of the homicide.

Nelson told reporters that when she was six years old she was flipping through channels at her grandparents home, where she was living. She came across a Crime Stoppers re-enactment of a young women being stabbed in her apartment.

“As young as I was, I still remember being terrified and sad for this woman and sad for her family. Moments later a picture of the woman holding her child was put on the screen and I realized at that moment that that was my mother. I knew because this is the same picture that was in my living room to this day. I have never been able to get rid of the hurt and confusion that flooded my mind that night.”  

Nelson said her mother had always been a straight-A student until high school, when her curiosity led her astray.

“She had her whole life ahead of her to make better decisions for herself and especially for me — but that was stolen from us.”

Nelson, who is now 25, told reporters her grandparents were “torn apart” as they battled depression over the death of their daughter while caring for their toddler granddaughter.

“They are in a better place right now reunited with my mother, but it was a tough way to get there,” she said. “Now I stand alone, holding on to the hope that there will be justice in my mother’s case. I hope to one day have closure to what has caused me so much pain.”

One year after Nelson’s statement, there was still no arrest when Gravel told local media that police were still aware of two male suspects in the case.

Investigators have sought the opinion of experts in various investigative and scientific fields, including DNA analysis and DNA mixtures, both here in Canada and the United States, the Barrie police website states.

But while science has been able to eliminate suspects in this unsolved mystery, it has yet to provide enough evidence to bring a suspect to court.

As in many unsolved homicides, investigators hope a witness will still come forward with that key piece of missing evidence.

Anyone with information on this homicide is urged to call the Barrie Police Homicide Unit tip line at 705-725-7025 ext. 2160, or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS).