Essay on Senator Murray Sinclair wins Bishop Allen student $3K A&E prize

News Nov 14, 2017 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

Bishop Allen Academy’s Christina MacDonald recently took home the grand prize for A&E Network’s Lives That Make a Difference essay contest.

The 17-year-old impressed A&E’s panel of judges with her “eloquent” 300-word essay on Senator Murray Sinclair, which was chosen from more than a 1,000 submissions to win the $3,000 prize in the nation-wide contest.

“Christina’s essay made a powerful and convincing case for the impact Senator Murray Sinclair is having on Indigenous people in Canada, and the influence he is having on the next generation of leaders in Canada,” Sara Hinzman, A&E’s vice president of Distribution, said in a statement.

In her essay, MacDonald lauded Sinclair — Manitoba’s first Indigenous judge and former chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission — for his dedication to being “the voice for oppressed Indigenous Canadians.”

“Through his many successes, he has been a figure of empowerment to Canadians, showing that the most expeditious way to equality is not by forgetting the past, but through making efforts to reconcile and move forward,” MacDonald wrote of Sinclair, who was named to the Senate last April.

“A promoter of truth and forgiveness, Sinclair has truly impacted the lives of all Canadians by challenging the country to educate themselves and become informed about the dire situation regarding those of Aboriginal lineage.”

MacDonald said she first learned about Sinclair during her research into Indigenous issues following a history class discussion about the youth suicide crisis in Attawapiskat First Nation last year.

“It wasn’t part of the curriculum, but we actually wrote letters to (then Minister of Health) Jane Philpott, so I’d already studied some of the crises in the Aboriginal community,” she said.

“It was then that I learned about how (Sinclair) had such a big impact on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission ... and I just thought that was really inspiring, really cool.”

MacDonald said she plans to use her A&E prize money toward tuition next year at either Queen’s or McMaster University, where she hopes to study Life Sciences.

“My end goal is still very unclear, but I know I want to help people,” she said. “I want to have a direct impact in helping others.”


Essay on Senator Murray Sinclair wins Bishop Allen student $3K A&E prize

News Nov 14, 2017 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

Bishop Allen Academy’s Christina MacDonald recently took home the grand prize for A&E Network’s Lives That Make a Difference essay contest.

The 17-year-old impressed A&E’s panel of judges with her “eloquent” 300-word essay on Senator Murray Sinclair, which was chosen from more than a 1,000 submissions to win the $3,000 prize in the nation-wide contest.

“Christina’s essay made a powerful and convincing case for the impact Senator Murray Sinclair is having on Indigenous people in Canada, and the influence he is having on the next generation of leaders in Canada,” Sara Hinzman, A&E’s vice president of Distribution, said in a statement.

In her essay, MacDonald lauded Sinclair — Manitoba’s first Indigenous judge and former chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission — for his dedication to being “the voice for oppressed Indigenous Canadians.”

“Through his many successes, he has been a figure of empowerment to Canadians, showing that the most expeditious way to equality is not by forgetting the past, but through making efforts to reconcile and move forward,” MacDonald wrote of Sinclair, who was named to the Senate last April.

“A promoter of truth and forgiveness, Sinclair has truly impacted the lives of all Canadians by challenging the country to educate themselves and become informed about the dire situation regarding those of Aboriginal lineage.”

MacDonald said she first learned about Sinclair during her research into Indigenous issues following a history class discussion about the youth suicide crisis in Attawapiskat First Nation last year.

“It wasn’t part of the curriculum, but we actually wrote letters to (then Minister of Health) Jane Philpott, so I’d already studied some of the crises in the Aboriginal community,” she said.

“It was then that I learned about how (Sinclair) had such a big impact on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission ... and I just thought that was really inspiring, really cool.”

MacDonald said she plans to use her A&E prize money toward tuition next year at either Queen’s or McMaster University, where she hopes to study Life Sciences.

“My end goal is still very unclear, but I know I want to help people,” she said. “I want to have a direct impact in helping others.”


Essay on Senator Murray Sinclair wins Bishop Allen student $3K A&E prize

News Nov 14, 2017 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

Bishop Allen Academy’s Christina MacDonald recently took home the grand prize for A&E Network’s Lives That Make a Difference essay contest.

The 17-year-old impressed A&E’s panel of judges with her “eloquent” 300-word essay on Senator Murray Sinclair, which was chosen from more than a 1,000 submissions to win the $3,000 prize in the nation-wide contest.

“Christina’s essay made a powerful and convincing case for the impact Senator Murray Sinclair is having on Indigenous people in Canada, and the influence he is having on the next generation of leaders in Canada,” Sara Hinzman, A&E’s vice president of Distribution, said in a statement.

In her essay, MacDonald lauded Sinclair — Manitoba’s first Indigenous judge and former chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission — for his dedication to being “the voice for oppressed Indigenous Canadians.”

“Through his many successes, he has been a figure of empowerment to Canadians, showing that the most expeditious way to equality is not by forgetting the past, but through making efforts to reconcile and move forward,” MacDonald wrote of Sinclair, who was named to the Senate last April.

“A promoter of truth and forgiveness, Sinclair has truly impacted the lives of all Canadians by challenging the country to educate themselves and become informed about the dire situation regarding those of Aboriginal lineage.”

MacDonald said she first learned about Sinclair during her research into Indigenous issues following a history class discussion about the youth suicide crisis in Attawapiskat First Nation last year.

“It wasn’t part of the curriculum, but we actually wrote letters to (then Minister of Health) Jane Philpott, so I’d already studied some of the crises in the Aboriginal community,” she said.

“It was then that I learned about how (Sinclair) had such a big impact on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission ... and I just thought that was really inspiring, really cool.”

MacDonald said she plans to use her A&E prize money toward tuition next year at either Queen’s or McMaster University, where she hopes to study Life Sciences.

“My end goal is still very unclear, but I know I want to help people,” she said. “I want to have a direct impact in helping others.”