Time will tell how successful King Street pilot project is

News Nov 13, 2017 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

Despite plenty of attention leading up to its first day, the rollout of the King Street pilot project hit some roadblocks when it was first put into place. Now, the TTC and Toronto police are hoping increased awareness on the part of drivers will allow it to succeed as planned

The pilot project gave additional priority to streetcars along King Street in the most congested portion of downtown. For the next year, cars will have to detour off of King in the downtown core, with westbound vehicles turning off at Jarvis and eastbound vehicles forced to detour at Bathurst. There will also be several intersections within that stretch where local traffic will have to exit King Street to make way for streetcars.

While the pilot project was designed to hasten the commute of the roughly 65,000 people who make use of that streetcar route daily, many drivers pleaded ignorance when the pilot in the first days after the project started up on Sunday, Nov. 12.

“Unfortunately, a large number of individuals have been claiming they didn’t know (about the new traffic restrictions),” said Toronto police Const. Clint Stibbe.

He said new signs along the route are highly visible, with fluorescent highlights to alert drivers that there are new traffic restrictions in place.

Many drivers, Stibbe noted, have “sympathetic reactions,” simply following behind other cars that illegally drive through prohibited intersections.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross acknowledged the early confusion, but said overall feedback has been positive.

“Right now, we’re looking at data, and if there are any tweaks that need to be made, we’ll make them,” he said.

He added that streetcars often took 30 to 40 minutes to travel between Bathurst and Jarvis along King, and the TTC is collecting data to see how those times are streamlined.

“Even a couple of minutes here and there makes a difference up and down the line,” he said.

Drivers caught disobeying traffic signs along King can earn a $110 fine and lose two demerit points.

The pilot project will be re-evaluated after a year.

Time will tell how successful King Street pilot project is

One-year project will give streetcars priority

News Nov 13, 2017 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

Despite plenty of attention leading up to its first day, the rollout of the King Street pilot project hit some roadblocks when it was first put into place. Now, the TTC and Toronto police are hoping increased awareness on the part of drivers will allow it to succeed as planned

The pilot project gave additional priority to streetcars along King Street in the most congested portion of downtown. For the next year, cars will have to detour off of King in the downtown core, with westbound vehicles turning off at Jarvis and eastbound vehicles forced to detour at Bathurst. There will also be several intersections within that stretch where local traffic will have to exit King Street to make way for streetcars.

While the pilot project was designed to hasten the commute of the roughly 65,000 people who make use of that streetcar route daily, many drivers pleaded ignorance when the pilot in the first days after the project started up on Sunday, Nov. 12.

“Unfortunately, a large number of individuals have been claiming they didn’t know (about the new traffic restrictions),” said Toronto police Const. Clint Stibbe.

He said new signs along the route are highly visible, with fluorescent highlights to alert drivers that there are new traffic restrictions in place.

Many drivers, Stibbe noted, have “sympathetic reactions,” simply following behind other cars that illegally drive through prohibited intersections.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross acknowledged the early confusion, but said overall feedback has been positive.

“Right now, we’re looking at data, and if there are any tweaks that need to be made, we’ll make them,” he said.

He added that streetcars often took 30 to 40 minutes to travel between Bathurst and Jarvis along King, and the TTC is collecting data to see how those times are streamlined.

“Even a couple of minutes here and there makes a difference up and down the line,” he said.

Drivers caught disobeying traffic signs along King can earn a $110 fine and lose two demerit points.

The pilot project will be re-evaluated after a year.

Time will tell how successful King Street pilot project is

One-year project will give streetcars priority

News Nov 13, 2017 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

Despite plenty of attention leading up to its first day, the rollout of the King Street pilot project hit some roadblocks when it was first put into place. Now, the TTC and Toronto police are hoping increased awareness on the part of drivers will allow it to succeed as planned

The pilot project gave additional priority to streetcars along King Street in the most congested portion of downtown. For the next year, cars will have to detour off of King in the downtown core, with westbound vehicles turning off at Jarvis and eastbound vehicles forced to detour at Bathurst. There will also be several intersections within that stretch where local traffic will have to exit King Street to make way for streetcars.

While the pilot project was designed to hasten the commute of the roughly 65,000 people who make use of that streetcar route daily, many drivers pleaded ignorance when the pilot in the first days after the project started up on Sunday, Nov. 12.

“Unfortunately, a large number of individuals have been claiming they didn’t know (about the new traffic restrictions),” said Toronto police Const. Clint Stibbe.

He said new signs along the route are highly visible, with fluorescent highlights to alert drivers that there are new traffic restrictions in place.

Many drivers, Stibbe noted, have “sympathetic reactions,” simply following behind other cars that illegally drive through prohibited intersections.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross acknowledged the early confusion, but said overall feedback has been positive.

“Right now, we’re looking at data, and if there are any tweaks that need to be made, we’ll make them,” he said.

He added that streetcars often took 30 to 40 minutes to travel between Bathurst and Jarvis along King, and the TTC is collecting data to see how those times are streamlined.

“Even a couple of minutes here and there makes a difference up and down the line,” he said.

Drivers caught disobeying traffic signs along King can earn a $110 fine and lose two demerit points.

The pilot project will be re-evaluated after a year.