Scarborough resident awarded Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal

News May 07, 2012 Scarborough Mirror

In a time before mass e-mails and Google alerts, police officers from two divisions would come to Marian MacDonald's door each morning with a list of alerts.

MacDonald would phone the Neighbourhood Watch chairpersons in Scarborough, who phoned their block captains, who phoned or spoke to people on their streets about crimes committed or suspicious persons seen nearby.

The Neighbourhood Watch programs have withered since, but the notification system was in place when the Scarborough Rapist stalked the area in the late 1980s, and MacDonald was at the heart of Scarborough Neighbourhood Watch.

On request, she spoke to residents of different neighbourhoods about crime prevention and to police recruits at Charles O. Bick College in Scarborough about community policing, she recalled.

"We were trying to get them used to working with the good people."

In 1998, her volunteer background got her hired, as executive director of the Army Cadet League of Canada (Ontario). Though never a cadet herself, MacDonald became convinced the cadet program, by keeping teenagers busy and motivated, kept them out of trouble.

Cadets, who range from ages 12 to 19, feel special "because they are saluted, they are given a rank." They learn respect and employers know they are responsible and reliable, she said.

The program also costs parents nothing and some cadets are also selected for free summer camps.

McDonald, for service to the cadet league and past community service, was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal at the league's recent annual general meeting in Markham.

Scarborough resident awarded Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal

Worked with police divisions in Neighbourhood Watch Program, Army Cadet League

News May 07, 2012 Scarborough Mirror

In a time before mass e-mails and Google alerts, police officers from two divisions would come to Marian MacDonald's door each morning with a list of alerts.

MacDonald would phone the Neighbourhood Watch chairpersons in Scarborough, who phoned their block captains, who phoned or spoke to people on their streets about crimes committed or suspicious persons seen nearby.

The Neighbourhood Watch programs have withered since, but the notification system was in place when the Scarborough Rapist stalked the area in the late 1980s, and MacDonald was at the heart of Scarborough Neighbourhood Watch.

On request, she spoke to residents of different neighbourhoods about crime prevention and to police recruits at Charles O. Bick College in Scarborough about community policing, she recalled.

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"We were trying to get them used to working with the good people."

In 1998, her volunteer background got her hired, as executive director of the Army Cadet League of Canada (Ontario). Though never a cadet herself, MacDonald became convinced the cadet program, by keeping teenagers busy and motivated, kept them out of trouble.

Cadets, who range from ages 12 to 19, feel special "because they are saluted, they are given a rank." They learn respect and employers know they are responsible and reliable, she said.

The program also costs parents nothing and some cadets are also selected for free summer camps.

McDonald, for service to the cadet league and past community service, was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal at the league's recent annual general meeting in Markham.

Scarborough resident awarded Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal

Worked with police divisions in Neighbourhood Watch Program, Army Cadet League

News May 07, 2012 Scarborough Mirror

In a time before mass e-mails and Google alerts, police officers from two divisions would come to Marian MacDonald's door each morning with a list of alerts.

MacDonald would phone the Neighbourhood Watch chairpersons in Scarborough, who phoned their block captains, who phoned or spoke to people on their streets about crimes committed or suspicious persons seen nearby.

The Neighbourhood Watch programs have withered since, but the notification system was in place when the Scarborough Rapist stalked the area in the late 1980s, and MacDonald was at the heart of Scarborough Neighbourhood Watch.

On request, she spoke to residents of different neighbourhoods about crime prevention and to police recruits at Charles O. Bick College in Scarborough about community policing, she recalled.

Related Content

"We were trying to get them used to working with the good people."

In 1998, her volunteer background got her hired, as executive director of the Army Cadet League of Canada (Ontario). Though never a cadet herself, MacDonald became convinced the cadet program, by keeping teenagers busy and motivated, kept them out of trouble.

Cadets, who range from ages 12 to 19, feel special "because they are saluted, they are given a rank." They learn respect and employers know they are responsible and reliable, she said.

The program also costs parents nothing and some cadets are also selected for free summer camps.

McDonald, for service to the cadet league and past community service, was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal at the league's recent annual general meeting in Markham.