Good Foot delivers packages and opportunity across Toronto

News Sep 14, 2017 by Rahul Gupta Bloor West Villager

Good Foot Delivery will pick up almost any package and drop it off promptly wherever you want in Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area.

There are some items Ryan Hollinrake will balk at, like for example, a recent request to transport a 20-foot pipe.

“Clearly someone didn’t read what we do,” said Hollinrake, Good Foot’s affable managing director, laughing. “We’ll deliver your package as long as it fits on the TTC.”

The social enterprise company and non-profit employs more than 30 couriers, plus a small office staff. Last year, Good Foot delivered a record 11,500 packages. In a slow month, it will still move more than 800 parcels. As the company’s name suggests, all orders are delivered by foot or public transit.

“We’re not your typical courier company,” Hollinrake said.

Not only will Good Foot pick up your parcel and deliver it for a fee, it will sort mail, deposit cheques, deliver an ice cream cake fast enough to prevent it from melting. Forgot your keys at a friend’s house? A Good Foot courier will pick them up and drop them off. 

“We just had a customer who broke a pair of eyeglasses. We picked them up, took them in to get them fixed and then dropped them back off,” Hollinrake said.  

The company also has blue-chip clients and sponsors. Beanfield Metroconnect one of its largest customers often ships 10 parcels a day via Good Foot. CIBC and TD Bank also make use of the service, and recently Facebook.

One aspect which separates the company from the rest of the industry: all of its couriers, dispatchers and trainers have some form of developmental disability, from autism to Down’s Syndrome. 

Not that it prevents them from doing their job; Hollinrake says he has to sometimes remind his couriers not to deliver the packages too quickly. Some of the most productive couriers can deliver more than eight packages during a single seven-hour shift. Unlike a harried courier faced with delivering a truck full of parcels, Good Foot couriers endear themselves to their customers, adding a little personality to the job.

The company was the brainchild of Kirsten Gauthier and her brother Jon, Good Foot’s first courier, launching in 2009. Gauthier is now chair of the company’s board of directors.

Jon said the company started modestly with around three or four volunteer couriers. After hitting its fundraising goals the company was able to start paying its couriers and began to grow steadily. 

“Each year we doubled our revenue and our staff,” Jon said. “It’s great to help people out and give them a place to come to every day.”

Jon, who has a developmental disability, continues to train new employees and handles social media marketing.

“We didn’t have a business plan or anything,” he said. “We just presented a solution to a problem.”

Good Foot is not just a place of employment, it’s a community hub for the couriers who will hang out well past their shifts. There’s more room now with the company having recently expanded its office space inside the Centre for Social Innovation.

Good Foot operates under a zero-profit model, with 100 per cent of revenues going to its employees, and day-to-day operating costs covered through charity donations. It supplements revenues with donations and in-kind sponsorships, like hot lunches for staff provided by local eateries. Beyond the odd federal grant, it receives no government funding. 

Hollinrake, who has been with the company since December 2016, says it’s almost at a break-even point where it can pay its employees, as well as cover operating costs solely from revenue.

“We want Good Foot to be self-sustaining eventually,” he said.

The company is  steadily building up its donor base, attracting interest from Fortune 500 companies and people who just want to help. 

Mike Wilson, the Toronto Maple Leafs super fan and largest private collector of the hockey team’s memorabilia recently hosted a charity fundraiser, inviting Good Foot’s entire staff to his Forest Hill home to check out the vast collection. In one night, the company collected some $40,000 in donations.

During donation pitches he says he’ll forgo the typical Powerpoint presentation, instead inviting some of the couriers to talk directly with well-heeled donors. 10 minutes is all they need to compel a donation.

“Once you meet our staff, you just get it,” he said.

Good Foot delivers packages and opportunity across Toronto

Non-profit delivers hundreds of parcels a month by foot and public transit

News Sep 14, 2017 by Rahul Gupta Bloor West Villager

Good Foot Delivery will pick up almost any package and drop it off promptly wherever you want in Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area.

There are some items Ryan Hollinrake will balk at, like for example, a recent request to transport a 20-foot pipe.

“Clearly someone didn’t read what we do,” said Hollinrake, Good Foot’s affable managing director, laughing. “We’ll deliver your package as long as it fits on the TTC.”

The social enterprise company and non-profit employs more than 30 couriers, plus a small office staff. Last year, Good Foot delivered a record 11,500 packages. In a slow month, it will still move more than 800 parcels. As the company’s name suggests, all orders are delivered by foot or public transit.

Not only will Good Foot pick up your parcel and deliver it for a fee, it will sort mail, deposit cheques, deliver an ice cream cake fast enough to prevent it from melting. Forgot your keys at a friend’s house? A Good Foot courier will pick them up and drop them off.

“We’re not your typical courier company,” Hollinrake said.

Not only will Good Foot pick up your parcel and deliver it for a fee, it will sort mail, deposit cheques, deliver an ice cream cake fast enough to prevent it from melting. Forgot your keys at a friend’s house? A Good Foot courier will pick them up and drop them off. 

“We just had a customer who broke a pair of eyeglasses. We picked them up, took them in to get them fixed and then dropped them back off,” Hollinrake said.  

The company also has blue-chip clients and sponsors. Beanfield Metroconnect one of its largest customers often ships 10 parcels a day via Good Foot. CIBC and TD Bank also make use of the service, and recently Facebook.

One aspect which separates the company from the rest of the industry: all of its couriers, dispatchers and trainers have some form of developmental disability, from autism to Down’s Syndrome. 

Not that it prevents them from doing their job; Hollinrake says he has to sometimes remind his couriers not to deliver the packages too quickly. Some of the most productive couriers can deliver more than eight packages during a single seven-hour shift. Unlike a harried courier faced with delivering a truck full of parcels, Good Foot couriers endear themselves to their customers, adding a little personality to the job.

The company was the brainchild of Kirsten Gauthier and her brother Jon, Good Foot’s first courier, launching in 2009. Gauthier is now chair of the company’s board of directors.

Jon said the company started modestly with around three or four volunteer couriers. After hitting its fundraising goals the company was able to start paying its couriers and began to grow steadily. 

“Each year we doubled our revenue and our staff,” Jon said. “It’s great to help people out and give them a place to come to every day.”

Jon, who has a developmental disability, continues to train new employees and handles social media marketing.

“We didn’t have a business plan or anything,” he said. “We just presented a solution to a problem.”

Good Foot is not just a place of employment, it’s a community hub for the couriers who will hang out well past their shifts. There’s more room now with the company having recently expanded its office space inside the Centre for Social Innovation.

Good Foot operates under a zero-profit model, with 100 per cent of revenues going to its employees, and day-to-day operating costs covered through charity donations. It supplements revenues with donations and in-kind sponsorships, like hot lunches for staff provided by local eateries. Beyond the odd federal grant, it receives no government funding. 

Hollinrake, who has been with the company since December 2016, says it’s almost at a break-even point where it can pay its employees, as well as cover operating costs solely from revenue.

“We want Good Foot to be self-sustaining eventually,” he said.

The company is  steadily building up its donor base, attracting interest from Fortune 500 companies and people who just want to help. 

Mike Wilson, the Toronto Maple Leafs super fan and largest private collector of the hockey team’s memorabilia recently hosted a charity fundraiser, inviting Good Foot’s entire staff to his Forest Hill home to check out the vast collection. In one night, the company collected some $40,000 in donations.

During donation pitches he says he’ll forgo the typical Powerpoint presentation, instead inviting some of the couriers to talk directly with well-heeled donors. 10 minutes is all they need to compel a donation.

“Once you meet our staff, you just get it,” he said.

Good Foot delivers packages and opportunity across Toronto

Non-profit delivers hundreds of parcels a month by foot and public transit

News Sep 14, 2017 by Rahul Gupta Bloor West Villager

Good Foot Delivery will pick up almost any package and drop it off promptly wherever you want in Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area.

There are some items Ryan Hollinrake will balk at, like for example, a recent request to transport a 20-foot pipe.

“Clearly someone didn’t read what we do,” said Hollinrake, Good Foot’s affable managing director, laughing. “We’ll deliver your package as long as it fits on the TTC.”

The social enterprise company and non-profit employs more than 30 couriers, plus a small office staff. Last year, Good Foot delivered a record 11,500 packages. In a slow month, it will still move more than 800 parcels. As the company’s name suggests, all orders are delivered by foot or public transit.

Not only will Good Foot pick up your parcel and deliver it for a fee, it will sort mail, deposit cheques, deliver an ice cream cake fast enough to prevent it from melting. Forgot your keys at a friend’s house? A Good Foot courier will pick them up and drop them off.

“We’re not your typical courier company,” Hollinrake said.

Not only will Good Foot pick up your parcel and deliver it for a fee, it will sort mail, deposit cheques, deliver an ice cream cake fast enough to prevent it from melting. Forgot your keys at a friend’s house? A Good Foot courier will pick them up and drop them off. 

“We just had a customer who broke a pair of eyeglasses. We picked them up, took them in to get them fixed and then dropped them back off,” Hollinrake said.  

The company also has blue-chip clients and sponsors. Beanfield Metroconnect one of its largest customers often ships 10 parcels a day via Good Foot. CIBC and TD Bank also make use of the service, and recently Facebook.

One aspect which separates the company from the rest of the industry: all of its couriers, dispatchers and trainers have some form of developmental disability, from autism to Down’s Syndrome. 

Not that it prevents them from doing their job; Hollinrake says he has to sometimes remind his couriers not to deliver the packages too quickly. Some of the most productive couriers can deliver more than eight packages during a single seven-hour shift. Unlike a harried courier faced with delivering a truck full of parcels, Good Foot couriers endear themselves to their customers, adding a little personality to the job.

The company was the brainchild of Kirsten Gauthier and her brother Jon, Good Foot’s first courier, launching in 2009. Gauthier is now chair of the company’s board of directors.

Jon said the company started modestly with around three or four volunteer couriers. After hitting its fundraising goals the company was able to start paying its couriers and began to grow steadily. 

“Each year we doubled our revenue and our staff,” Jon said. “It’s great to help people out and give them a place to come to every day.”

Jon, who has a developmental disability, continues to train new employees and handles social media marketing.

“We didn’t have a business plan or anything,” he said. “We just presented a solution to a problem.”

Good Foot is not just a place of employment, it’s a community hub for the couriers who will hang out well past their shifts. There’s more room now with the company having recently expanded its office space inside the Centre for Social Innovation.

Good Foot operates under a zero-profit model, with 100 per cent of revenues going to its employees, and day-to-day operating costs covered through charity donations. It supplements revenues with donations and in-kind sponsorships, like hot lunches for staff provided by local eateries. Beyond the odd federal grant, it receives no government funding. 

Hollinrake, who has been with the company since December 2016, says it’s almost at a break-even point where it can pay its employees, as well as cover operating costs solely from revenue.

“We want Good Foot to be self-sustaining eventually,” he said.

The company is  steadily building up its donor base, attracting interest from Fortune 500 companies and people who just want to help. 

Mike Wilson, the Toronto Maple Leafs super fan and largest private collector of the hockey team’s memorabilia recently hosted a charity fundraiser, inviting Good Foot’s entire staff to his Forest Hill home to check out the vast collection. In one night, the company collected some $40,000 in donations.

During donation pitches he says he’ll forgo the typical Powerpoint presentation, instead inviting some of the couriers to talk directly with well-heeled donors. 10 minutes is all they need to compel a donation.

“Once you meet our staff, you just get it,” he said.