Woodbine bike lanes here to stay but traffic management may be tweaked

News Aug 30, 2017 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

The new bike lanes on Woodbine Avenue are here to stay.

That’s the word from local Ward 32 (Beaches-East York) Coun. Mary Margaret McMahon, days after the installation of the new bike lanes that stretch from Lakeshore Boulevard to O’Connor Drive along Woodbine Avenue.

“We’re open to tweaking but the lanes are part of the 10-year cycling plan,” said McMahon. “We’re not ripping them out.”

The lanes were approved earlier this year by Toronto council after public committee meetings and neighbourhood consultation. But when they arrived in August, they sparked outrage, particularly on social media, as motorists using Woodbine Avenue as a through-route during rush hour reportedly took to local roads to avoid the reduced lanes.

Rob Johnston, who lives on Burgess Avenue southeast of Woodbine and Gerrard, told Metroland Media Toronto that since the bike lanes were put in, cars are taking to his quiet residential street in droves, to bypass Woodbine and angle north to Gerrard Street via Golfview Road.

“It’s a hard thing because we’re certainly not against the bike lanes — a lot of us cycle,” he said. “Our concern is the inundation of the traffic.”

Burgess is already protected from inundation with a no-turn sign during rush hour and speed bumps, but Johnston says that doesn’t seem to matter to impatient drivers.

“There’s a sign at the end of our street and over the years I’ve seen it enforced maybe once or twice,” he said. “I know it’s human nature to cut through neighbourhoods.”

Like others on social media, Johnston says that he first heard of the bike lanes a week before they went in. But McMahon notes that the city has consulted extensively.

“There was extensive consultation. Not only did my office door-knock extensively up and down Woodbine, but it was in my newsletter. I rode around on my bike with the poster on the back of my basket. It was in the media, in social media, in local media,” said McMahon. “There’s no excuse for not knowing it was coming.”

McMahon said the bike lanes were approved unanimously as a part of the city’s 10-Year Cycling Plan earlier this year, and serve as the only link between the Martin Goodman Trail and the Cosburn bike lanes in East York.

But she said that the city would be open to dealing with traffic problems that arose from the reduction of lanes.

“It’s not complete,” she said. “There’s a plan to synchronize the traffic lights (to move cars more efficiently). The sky’s not falling. Just wait and see if there is a problem with turning at rush hour. If there is, we’ll tweak. We want the road to be safe and usable for everyone.”

Mayor John Tory echoed McMahon’s promise.

“If I’ve learned anything from this job it’s that you can never satisfy everybody,” he said. “But I will give my commitment to people in the Beach that we will examine the impact of the bike lanes, and if there are steps that need to be taken to make sure the neighbourhoods remain safe, those steps will be taken.”

Woodbine bike lanes here to stay but traffic management may be tweaked

Residents complain of traffic 'inundation' into neighbourhoods

News Aug 30, 2017 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

The new bike lanes on Woodbine Avenue are here to stay.

That’s the word from local Ward 32 (Beaches-East York) Coun. Mary Margaret McMahon, days after the installation of the new bike lanes that stretch from Lakeshore Boulevard to O’Connor Drive along Woodbine Avenue.

“We’re open to tweaking but the lanes are part of the 10-year cycling plan,” said McMahon. “We’re not ripping them out.”

The lanes were approved earlier this year by Toronto council after public committee meetings and neighbourhood consultation. But when they arrived in August, they sparked outrage, particularly on social media, as motorists using Woodbine Avenue as a through-route during rush hour reportedly took to local roads to avoid the reduced lanes.

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Rob Johnston, who lives on Burgess Avenue southeast of Woodbine and Gerrard, told Metroland Media Toronto that since the bike lanes were put in, cars are taking to his quiet residential street in droves, to bypass Woodbine and angle north to Gerrard Street via Golfview Road.

“It’s a hard thing because we’re certainly not against the bike lanes — a lot of us cycle,” he said. “Our concern is the inundation of the traffic.”

Burgess is already protected from inundation with a no-turn sign during rush hour and speed bumps, but Johnston says that doesn’t seem to matter to impatient drivers.

“There’s a sign at the end of our street and over the years I’ve seen it enforced maybe once or twice,” he said. “I know it’s human nature to cut through neighbourhoods.”

Like others on social media, Johnston says that he first heard of the bike lanes a week before they went in. But McMahon notes that the city has consulted extensively.

“There was extensive consultation. Not only did my office door-knock extensively up and down Woodbine, but it was in my newsletter. I rode around on my bike with the poster on the back of my basket. It was in the media, in social media, in local media,” said McMahon. “There’s no excuse for not knowing it was coming.”

McMahon said the bike lanes were approved unanimously as a part of the city’s 10-Year Cycling Plan earlier this year, and serve as the only link between the Martin Goodman Trail and the Cosburn bike lanes in East York.

But she said that the city would be open to dealing with traffic problems that arose from the reduction of lanes.

“It’s not complete,” she said. “There’s a plan to synchronize the traffic lights (to move cars more efficiently). The sky’s not falling. Just wait and see if there is a problem with turning at rush hour. If there is, we’ll tweak. We want the road to be safe and usable for everyone.”

Mayor John Tory echoed McMahon’s promise.

“If I’ve learned anything from this job it’s that you can never satisfy everybody,” he said. “But I will give my commitment to people in the Beach that we will examine the impact of the bike lanes, and if there are steps that need to be taken to make sure the neighbourhoods remain safe, those steps will be taken.”

Woodbine bike lanes here to stay but traffic management may be tweaked

Residents complain of traffic 'inundation' into neighbourhoods

News Aug 30, 2017 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

The new bike lanes on Woodbine Avenue are here to stay.

That’s the word from local Ward 32 (Beaches-East York) Coun. Mary Margaret McMahon, days after the installation of the new bike lanes that stretch from Lakeshore Boulevard to O’Connor Drive along Woodbine Avenue.

“We’re open to tweaking but the lanes are part of the 10-year cycling plan,” said McMahon. “We’re not ripping them out.”

The lanes were approved earlier this year by Toronto council after public committee meetings and neighbourhood consultation. But when they arrived in August, they sparked outrage, particularly on social media, as motorists using Woodbine Avenue as a through-route during rush hour reportedly took to local roads to avoid the reduced lanes.

Related Content

Rob Johnston, who lives on Burgess Avenue southeast of Woodbine and Gerrard, told Metroland Media Toronto that since the bike lanes were put in, cars are taking to his quiet residential street in droves, to bypass Woodbine and angle north to Gerrard Street via Golfview Road.

“It’s a hard thing because we’re certainly not against the bike lanes — a lot of us cycle,” he said. “Our concern is the inundation of the traffic.”

Burgess is already protected from inundation with a no-turn sign during rush hour and speed bumps, but Johnston says that doesn’t seem to matter to impatient drivers.

“There’s a sign at the end of our street and over the years I’ve seen it enforced maybe once or twice,” he said. “I know it’s human nature to cut through neighbourhoods.”

Like others on social media, Johnston says that he first heard of the bike lanes a week before they went in. But McMahon notes that the city has consulted extensively.

“There was extensive consultation. Not only did my office door-knock extensively up and down Woodbine, but it was in my newsletter. I rode around on my bike with the poster on the back of my basket. It was in the media, in social media, in local media,” said McMahon. “There’s no excuse for not knowing it was coming.”

McMahon said the bike lanes were approved unanimously as a part of the city’s 10-Year Cycling Plan earlier this year, and serve as the only link between the Martin Goodman Trail and the Cosburn bike lanes in East York.

But she said that the city would be open to dealing with traffic problems that arose from the reduction of lanes.

“It’s not complete,” she said. “There’s a plan to synchronize the traffic lights (to move cars more efficiently). The sky’s not falling. Just wait and see if there is a problem with turning at rush hour. If there is, we’ll tweak. We want the road to be safe and usable for everyone.”

Mayor John Tory echoed McMahon’s promise.

“If I’ve learned anything from this job it’s that you can never satisfy everybody,” he said. “But I will give my commitment to people in the Beach that we will examine the impact of the bike lanes, and if there are steps that need to be taken to make sure the neighbourhoods remain safe, those steps will be taken.”