Broadview Hotel reopening a catalyst for Riverside neighbourhood

News Aug 10, 2017 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

The reopening of the Broadview Hotel late last month, amid much fanfare after a complex, two-year renovation, could prove a catalyst to the neighbourhood's future.

“The opening of the Broadview Hotel is an exciting time for the Riverside BIA,” wrote Mitch Korman, chair of the Riverside Business Improvement Area, in an email to The Mirror.

“The hotel will not only draw a whole new group of people to Riverside, it will produce a ripple effect that will bolster the positive changes we’ve been seeing in recent years throughout our community.”

Junie Boudreau, who grew up in the Queen-Broadview area when it was still blue collar, said she was glad to see the circa 1891 heritage building at 106 Broadview Ave. restored, but added it's still bittersweet to see the old neighbourhood disappearing little by little.

“It’s kind of tough to see all the changes,” said Boudreau, an independent filmmaker who runs a Facebook group called 1970s — Queen and Logan Area — Toronto.

She remembers meeting friends and family at the former New Broadview Hotel for a few drinks, even before Jilly’s gentleman’s club occupied the first floor.

“It was one of the neighbourhood watering holes. It was seedy at times, but everyone went there,” Boudreau shared.

“The Broadview was our old stomping ground along with The Edwin A.K.A. Club 650.”

In 2010, the New Edwin Hotel at 650 Queen St. E. reopened as First Step to Home, a transitional residence for 28 homeless and street-involved senior men run by WoodGreen Community Services.   

The east-end social service agency also played an important role in helping find new and better homes for dozens of marginalized individuals who were living at The New Broadview.

In a statement, Anne Babcock, WoodGreen’s president and CEO, said she’s happy the building’s new owner and developer worked closely with the city and her agency to help those tenants.

“In 2014, WoodGreen, Streetcar (Developments) and City of Toronto staff came together to create a fantastic public-private sector partnership to rehouse more than 40 low-income people who were living at The New Broadview Hotel at the time Streetcar bought it,” Babcock said.

“That partnership really illustrated how successful we can be when developers work with agencies like WoodGreen to reach a common goal of supporting vulnerable people who are being displaced. This kind of redevelopment is increasing in Toronto, so I certainly hope WoodGreen will see more developers at the table working in good faith just as Streetcar did to ensure people don’t end up out on the street.”

Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said she’s happy to see The Broadview Hotel restored and those who lived there in a much better situation.

“That hotel was ready to fall down and people were living inside in terrible conditions, much like at the New Edwin,” she said during a recent interview.

And while change is good, it’s also significant, she said.

“(The reopening) does signify a big, big change but it also brings a heritage building back, which was in danger of being lost,” said Fletcher, who said despite the evolution of the area, Riverside remains a place where everyone is welcome.

“The incredible heart of this community still exists. It’s important to keep that inclusive spirit.”

 

 

 

Broadview Hotel reopening a catalyst for Riverside neighbourhood

'Ripple effect will bolster the positive changes we've been seeing,' says Riverside BIA chair

News Aug 10, 2017 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

The reopening of the Broadview Hotel late last month, amid much fanfare after a complex, two-year renovation, could prove a catalyst to the neighbourhood's future.

“The opening of the Broadview Hotel is an exciting time for the Riverside BIA,” wrote Mitch Korman, chair of the Riverside Business Improvement Area, in an email to The Mirror.

“The hotel will not only draw a whole new group of people to Riverside, it will produce a ripple effect that will bolster the positive changes we’ve been seeing in recent years throughout our community.”

Junie Boudreau, who grew up in the Queen-Broadview area when it was still blue collar, said she was glad to see the circa 1891 heritage building at 106 Broadview Ave. restored, but added it's still bittersweet to see the old neighbourhood disappearing little by little.

“It’s kind of tough to see all the changes,” said Boudreau, an independent filmmaker who runs a Facebook group called 1970s — Queen and Logan Area — Toronto.

She remembers meeting friends and family at the former New Broadview Hotel for a few drinks, even before Jilly’s gentleman’s club occupied the first floor.

“It was one of the neighbourhood watering holes. It was seedy at times, but everyone went there,” Boudreau shared.

“The Broadview was our old stomping ground along with The Edwin A.K.A. Club 650.”

In 2010, the New Edwin Hotel at 650 Queen St. E. reopened as First Step to Home, a transitional residence for 28 homeless and street-involved senior men run by WoodGreen Community Services.   

The east-end social service agency also played an important role in helping find new and better homes for dozens of marginalized individuals who were living at The New Broadview.

In a statement, Anne Babcock, WoodGreen’s president and CEO, said she’s happy the building’s new owner and developer worked closely with the city and her agency to help those tenants.

“In 2014, WoodGreen, Streetcar (Developments) and City of Toronto staff came together to create a fantastic public-private sector partnership to rehouse more than 40 low-income people who were living at The New Broadview Hotel at the time Streetcar bought it,” Babcock said.

“That partnership really illustrated how successful we can be when developers work with agencies like WoodGreen to reach a common goal of supporting vulnerable people who are being displaced. This kind of redevelopment is increasing in Toronto, so I certainly hope WoodGreen will see more developers at the table working in good faith just as Streetcar did to ensure people don’t end up out on the street.”

Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said she’s happy to see The Broadview Hotel restored and those who lived there in a much better situation.

“That hotel was ready to fall down and people were living inside in terrible conditions, much like at the New Edwin,” she said during a recent interview.

And while change is good, it’s also significant, she said.

“(The reopening) does signify a big, big change but it also brings a heritage building back, which was in danger of being lost,” said Fletcher, who said despite the evolution of the area, Riverside remains a place where everyone is welcome.

“The incredible heart of this community still exists. It’s important to keep that inclusive spirit.”

 

 

 

Broadview Hotel reopening a catalyst for Riverside neighbourhood

'Ripple effect will bolster the positive changes we've been seeing,' says Riverside BIA chair

News Aug 10, 2017 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

The reopening of the Broadview Hotel late last month, amid much fanfare after a complex, two-year renovation, could prove a catalyst to the neighbourhood's future.

“The opening of the Broadview Hotel is an exciting time for the Riverside BIA,” wrote Mitch Korman, chair of the Riverside Business Improvement Area, in an email to The Mirror.

“The hotel will not only draw a whole new group of people to Riverside, it will produce a ripple effect that will bolster the positive changes we’ve been seeing in recent years throughout our community.”

Junie Boudreau, who grew up in the Queen-Broadview area when it was still blue collar, said she was glad to see the circa 1891 heritage building at 106 Broadview Ave. restored, but added it's still bittersweet to see the old neighbourhood disappearing little by little.

“It’s kind of tough to see all the changes,” said Boudreau, an independent filmmaker who runs a Facebook group called 1970s — Queen and Logan Area — Toronto.

She remembers meeting friends and family at the former New Broadview Hotel for a few drinks, even before Jilly’s gentleman’s club occupied the first floor.

“It was one of the neighbourhood watering holes. It was seedy at times, but everyone went there,” Boudreau shared.

“The Broadview was our old stomping ground along with The Edwin A.K.A. Club 650.”

In 2010, the New Edwin Hotel at 650 Queen St. E. reopened as First Step to Home, a transitional residence for 28 homeless and street-involved senior men run by WoodGreen Community Services.   

The east-end social service agency also played an important role in helping find new and better homes for dozens of marginalized individuals who were living at The New Broadview.

In a statement, Anne Babcock, WoodGreen’s president and CEO, said she’s happy the building’s new owner and developer worked closely with the city and her agency to help those tenants.

“In 2014, WoodGreen, Streetcar (Developments) and City of Toronto staff came together to create a fantastic public-private sector partnership to rehouse more than 40 low-income people who were living at The New Broadview Hotel at the time Streetcar bought it,” Babcock said.

“That partnership really illustrated how successful we can be when developers work with agencies like WoodGreen to reach a common goal of supporting vulnerable people who are being displaced. This kind of redevelopment is increasing in Toronto, so I certainly hope WoodGreen will see more developers at the table working in good faith just as Streetcar did to ensure people don’t end up out on the street.”

Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said she’s happy to see The Broadview Hotel restored and those who lived there in a much better situation.

“That hotel was ready to fall down and people were living inside in terrible conditions, much like at the New Edwin,” she said during a recent interview.

And while change is good, it’s also significant, she said.

“(The reopening) does signify a big, big change but it also brings a heritage building back, which was in danger of being lost,” said Fletcher, who said despite the evolution of the area, Riverside remains a place where everyone is welcome.

“The incredible heart of this community still exists. It’s important to keep that inclusive spirit.”