Etobicoke, Mississauga residents fight GTAA over Pearson airport growth plans

News Jul 12, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Greater Toronto Airports Authority officials faced a chorus of angry Etobicoke residents Tuesday night.

Approximately 500 Etobicoke and Mississauga residents packed a hall in the Toronto Congress Centre to hear and respond to the Greater Toronto Airports Authority's (GTAA) growth plans for Toronto Pearson International Airport. Many blasted GTAA officials, and sharply criticized their plans to grow at all.

In 2037, GTAA officials forecast a near doubling from 2016 levels to 80-million passengers a year travelling through Pearson airport.

“Do not grow. Pearson has exceeded its max,” one woman implored. “The decisions being made by the GTAA are all about dollars, all about growth, not about people. We cannot let this happen. It’s destroying our lives. It’s destroying our property values. It’s destroying our health.”

Another woman charged the GTAA with a lack of accountability.

“All of our conversations are with the foxes in charge of the hen house,” the woman said. “The foxes don’t report to anybody. Where’s the government oversight?”

The GTAA is a nonprofit organization which has operated Toronto Pearson airport since 1996. Conducting a 20-year master plan is mandated in the GTAA’s airport lease agreement.

Hillary Marshall, GTAA’s vice-president of stakeholder relations and communications, said residents’ feedback will inform “what principles should be considered” in the agency’s growth plans.

“We’re taking all your feedback and putting it into a framework for responsible growth: how we invest and how we operate around noise (issues),” Marshall said.

Residents may complete a Noise Fairness and Airport Growth survey online at www.torontopearson.com/rrp until July 31.

The GTAA’s vision is “to be the best airport in the world; to run a first-class international airport that meets the demand for capacity,” said Kim Stangeby, the GTAA’s new chief strategy officer.

An average day at Pearson sees 120,000 passengers travel through the airport, 1,250 aircraft movements, 1,233 tonnes of cargo flown and 40 to 50 night flights, Stangeby reported.

Passenger growth at Toronto's Pearson airport continues to follow a pattern of doubling every 20 years, Stangeby said, since 10.5-million passengers annually travelled through the airport in the 1970s.

Last year, Airports Council International (ACI) forecast global airport passenger traffic to double to more than 14 billion by 2029. The greatest growth in aviation demand would be in the Middle East (+7.7 per cent) and in the Asia Pacific Rim (+6.2 per cent), with just 2.8 per cent growth expected in North America, ACI World reported.

Stangeby showed another slide that called Toronto Pearson “Canada’s and North America’s gateway to the world.” It indicated Pearson has the “largest two-hour flight catchment area in North America,” meaning more passengers fly from Pearson to destinations within two hours of Toronto than do passengers flying out of New York City, Chicago’s O’Hare airport and LAX.

“That’s another reason why there is increased growth and capacity,” Stangeby said.

Etobicoke Centre Liberal MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj, like many residents, questioned the GTAA’s growth.

“Who says economic growth always provides benefits?” Wrzesnewskyj said in an interview during the meeting. “The environment and noise issues are why people came out here tonight. That’s why they’re engaging. Who says we want that kind of growth?”

The GTAA’s phased expansion plans include making terminals 1 and 3 a continuous terminal and adding additional space for passenger processing, Stangeby said.

Forecasted dramatic passenger growth is not anticipated to change Pearson’s airspace or runways since planes increasingly accommodate greater numbers of passengers, she added.

That’s little assurance to Grace Micek, who lives in the Rockwood neighbourhood of Mississauga near the Mill Road border with Etobicoke.

“It’s a war zone. All that’s missing is the bombs. It sounds like Iraq,” she said of the aircraft noise above her home.

Her husband, Bob, said many neighbours slept in their basements during the GTAA’s recent rehabilitation work of Runway 05/23, Canada’s busiest runway.

“People were sleeping in their basements because they couldn’t sleep,” he said. “Our houses were built in the 1960s and 1970s with windows and insulation (from that era). They said, ‘close the windows.’ But it didn’t help. You could feel the vibrations (from the overhead planes).”

Robyn Connelly, GTAA director of community relations, reported three noise studies are expected to be completed this fall, including NAV Canada’s independent Toronto Airspace Noise study conducted by a third party.

Tuesday night’s meeting had been scheduled for June 28, but was cancelled earlier that day by GTAA officials.

An “extensive outreach” of a community flyer absent registration information prompted GTAA concerns the Assembly Hall venue, designed to seat 120 people in a workshop, could not accommodate a huge turnout, a GTAA spokesperson said that night.

However, a reporter observed only a handful of residents approach the venue that night to attend the meeting.

Etobicoke, Mississauga residents fight GTAA over Pearson airport growth plans

‘It’s a war zone,” one resident said of aircraft noise above her home

News Jul 12, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Greater Toronto Airports Authority officials faced a chorus of angry Etobicoke residents Tuesday night.

Approximately 500 Etobicoke and Mississauga residents packed a hall in the Toronto Congress Centre to hear and respond to the Greater Toronto Airports Authority's (GTAA) growth plans for Toronto Pearson International Airport. Many blasted GTAA officials, and sharply criticized their plans to grow at all.

In 2037, GTAA officials forecast a near doubling from 2016 levels to 80-million passengers a year travelling through Pearson airport.

“Do not grow. Pearson has exceeded its max,” one woman implored. “The decisions being made by the GTAA are all about dollars, all about growth, not about people. We cannot let this happen. It’s destroying our lives. It’s destroying our property values. It’s destroying our health.”

Related Content

Another woman charged the GTAA with a lack of accountability.

“All of our conversations are with the foxes in charge of the hen house,” the woman said. “The foxes don’t report to anybody. Where’s the government oversight?”

The GTAA is a nonprofit organization which has operated Toronto Pearson airport since 1996. Conducting a 20-year master plan is mandated in the GTAA’s airport lease agreement.

Hillary Marshall, GTAA’s vice-president of stakeholder relations and communications, said residents’ feedback will inform “what principles should be considered” in the agency’s growth plans.

“We’re taking all your feedback and putting it into a framework for responsible growth: how we invest and how we operate around noise (issues),” Marshall said.

Residents may complete a Noise Fairness and Airport Growth survey online at www.torontopearson.com/rrp until July 31.

The GTAA’s vision is “to be the best airport in the world; to run a first-class international airport that meets the demand for capacity,” said Kim Stangeby, the GTAA’s new chief strategy officer.

An average day at Pearson sees 120,000 passengers travel through the airport, 1,250 aircraft movements, 1,233 tonnes of cargo flown and 40 to 50 night flights, Stangeby reported.

Passenger growth at Toronto's Pearson airport continues to follow a pattern of doubling every 20 years, Stangeby said, since 10.5-million passengers annually travelled through the airport in the 1970s.

Last year, Airports Council International (ACI) forecast global airport passenger traffic to double to more than 14 billion by 2029. The greatest growth in aviation demand would be in the Middle East (+7.7 per cent) and in the Asia Pacific Rim (+6.2 per cent), with just 2.8 per cent growth expected in North America, ACI World reported.

Stangeby showed another slide that called Toronto Pearson “Canada’s and North America’s gateway to the world.” It indicated Pearson has the “largest two-hour flight catchment area in North America,” meaning more passengers fly from Pearson to destinations within two hours of Toronto than do passengers flying out of New York City, Chicago’s O’Hare airport and LAX.

“That’s another reason why there is increased growth and capacity,” Stangeby said.

Etobicoke Centre Liberal MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj, like many residents, questioned the GTAA’s growth.

“Who says economic growth always provides benefits?” Wrzesnewskyj said in an interview during the meeting. “The environment and noise issues are why people came out here tonight. That’s why they’re engaging. Who says we want that kind of growth?”

The GTAA’s phased expansion plans include making terminals 1 and 3 a continuous terminal and adding additional space for passenger processing, Stangeby said.

Forecasted dramatic passenger growth is not anticipated to change Pearson’s airspace or runways since planes increasingly accommodate greater numbers of passengers, she added.

That’s little assurance to Grace Micek, who lives in the Rockwood neighbourhood of Mississauga near the Mill Road border with Etobicoke.

“It’s a war zone. All that’s missing is the bombs. It sounds like Iraq,” she said of the aircraft noise above her home.

Her husband, Bob, said many neighbours slept in their basements during the GTAA’s recent rehabilitation work of Runway 05/23, Canada’s busiest runway.

“People were sleeping in their basements because they couldn’t sleep,” he said. “Our houses were built in the 1960s and 1970s with windows and insulation (from that era). They said, ‘close the windows.’ But it didn’t help. You could feel the vibrations (from the overhead planes).”

Robyn Connelly, GTAA director of community relations, reported three noise studies are expected to be completed this fall, including NAV Canada’s independent Toronto Airspace Noise study conducted by a third party.

Tuesday night’s meeting had been scheduled for June 28, but was cancelled earlier that day by GTAA officials.

An “extensive outreach” of a community flyer absent registration information prompted GTAA concerns the Assembly Hall venue, designed to seat 120 people in a workshop, could not accommodate a huge turnout, a GTAA spokesperson said that night.

However, a reporter observed only a handful of residents approach the venue that night to attend the meeting.

Etobicoke, Mississauga residents fight GTAA over Pearson airport growth plans

‘It’s a war zone,” one resident said of aircraft noise above her home

News Jul 12, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Greater Toronto Airports Authority officials faced a chorus of angry Etobicoke residents Tuesday night.

Approximately 500 Etobicoke and Mississauga residents packed a hall in the Toronto Congress Centre to hear and respond to the Greater Toronto Airports Authority's (GTAA) growth plans for Toronto Pearson International Airport. Many blasted GTAA officials, and sharply criticized their plans to grow at all.

In 2037, GTAA officials forecast a near doubling from 2016 levels to 80-million passengers a year travelling through Pearson airport.

“Do not grow. Pearson has exceeded its max,” one woman implored. “The decisions being made by the GTAA are all about dollars, all about growth, not about people. We cannot let this happen. It’s destroying our lives. It’s destroying our property values. It’s destroying our health.”

Related Content

Another woman charged the GTAA with a lack of accountability.

“All of our conversations are with the foxes in charge of the hen house,” the woman said. “The foxes don’t report to anybody. Where’s the government oversight?”

The GTAA is a nonprofit organization which has operated Toronto Pearson airport since 1996. Conducting a 20-year master plan is mandated in the GTAA’s airport lease agreement.

Hillary Marshall, GTAA’s vice-president of stakeholder relations and communications, said residents’ feedback will inform “what principles should be considered” in the agency’s growth plans.

“We’re taking all your feedback and putting it into a framework for responsible growth: how we invest and how we operate around noise (issues),” Marshall said.

Residents may complete a Noise Fairness and Airport Growth survey online at www.torontopearson.com/rrp until July 31.

The GTAA’s vision is “to be the best airport in the world; to run a first-class international airport that meets the demand for capacity,” said Kim Stangeby, the GTAA’s new chief strategy officer.

An average day at Pearson sees 120,000 passengers travel through the airport, 1,250 aircraft movements, 1,233 tonnes of cargo flown and 40 to 50 night flights, Stangeby reported.

Passenger growth at Toronto's Pearson airport continues to follow a pattern of doubling every 20 years, Stangeby said, since 10.5-million passengers annually travelled through the airport in the 1970s.

Last year, Airports Council International (ACI) forecast global airport passenger traffic to double to more than 14 billion by 2029. The greatest growth in aviation demand would be in the Middle East (+7.7 per cent) and in the Asia Pacific Rim (+6.2 per cent), with just 2.8 per cent growth expected in North America, ACI World reported.

Stangeby showed another slide that called Toronto Pearson “Canada’s and North America’s gateway to the world.” It indicated Pearson has the “largest two-hour flight catchment area in North America,” meaning more passengers fly from Pearson to destinations within two hours of Toronto than do passengers flying out of New York City, Chicago’s O’Hare airport and LAX.

“That’s another reason why there is increased growth and capacity,” Stangeby said.

Etobicoke Centre Liberal MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj, like many residents, questioned the GTAA’s growth.

“Who says economic growth always provides benefits?” Wrzesnewskyj said in an interview during the meeting. “The environment and noise issues are why people came out here tonight. That’s why they’re engaging. Who says we want that kind of growth?”

The GTAA’s phased expansion plans include making terminals 1 and 3 a continuous terminal and adding additional space for passenger processing, Stangeby said.

Forecasted dramatic passenger growth is not anticipated to change Pearson’s airspace or runways since planes increasingly accommodate greater numbers of passengers, she added.

That’s little assurance to Grace Micek, who lives in the Rockwood neighbourhood of Mississauga near the Mill Road border with Etobicoke.

“It’s a war zone. All that’s missing is the bombs. It sounds like Iraq,” she said of the aircraft noise above her home.

Her husband, Bob, said many neighbours slept in their basements during the GTAA’s recent rehabilitation work of Runway 05/23, Canada’s busiest runway.

“People were sleeping in their basements because they couldn’t sleep,” he said. “Our houses were built in the 1960s and 1970s with windows and insulation (from that era). They said, ‘close the windows.’ But it didn’t help. You could feel the vibrations (from the overhead planes).”

Robyn Connelly, GTAA director of community relations, reported three noise studies are expected to be completed this fall, including NAV Canada’s independent Toronto Airspace Noise study conducted by a third party.

Tuesday night’s meeting had been scheduled for June 28, but was cancelled earlier that day by GTAA officials.

An “extensive outreach” of a community flyer absent registration information prompted GTAA concerns the Assembly Hall venue, designed to seat 120 people in a workshop, could not accommodate a huge turnout, a GTAA spokesperson said that night.

However, a reporter observed only a handful of residents approach the venue that night to attend the meeting.