Controversial Mimico concrete plant could move to eastern port lands: Grimes

News Jun 30, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

The controversial ML Ready Mix concrete plant that neighbouring Mimico residents complained for a decade causes dust, noise and quality-of-life issues could be moving out.

Etobicoke-Lakeshore Councillor Mark Grimes, who represents the area, said Friday a potential site for the concrete facility has been found in the city’s eastern port lands.

The eastern port lands is zoned heavy industrial. Years ago, Toronto council approved the area for use as a concrete facilities' campus.

“We found a site down in the port lands that is a compatible use that city planning supports,” Grimes said in an interview. “We still have a long way to go, but this is the first step toward removing ML from the Mimico community,” Grimes said.

Finalizing approvals and agreements for the new site will require a planning and negotiation process between city planners and ML Ready Mix principals, Grimes said. A company spokesperson declined to comment on this story.

Since 2007, neighbouring residents – some of whom live 20 feet from ML – have regularly complained about excessive noise and dust from the facility to the city and the Ministry of the Environment.

The ML Ready Mix facility at 29 Judson St. is on the south side of a residential street near the Mimico GO Train station, across from a park, seniors’ residence and adjacent houses.

The Guardian has been reporting on the facility and residents’ complaints about it for the past decade.

In recent years, Remicorp Industries Inc., which operates ML Ready Mix, and Metrolinx had submitted court applications against one another seeking a court decision on easements granted when Remicorp purchased a triangular-shaped piece of land from CNR in 2002.

The land, on the north side of the CNR tracks, is now Metrolinx property on Royal York Road fronting ML Ready Mix’s property.

The easements allow for access to maintenance of the railway tracks.

In 2016, a Superior Court of Justice decision ruled in favour of Remicorp, and dismissed Metrolinx’s application, finding Metrolinx had abandoned its easement.

Last month, a Court of Appeal for Ontario ruling overturned that decision and found in favour of Metrolinx. Remicorp was directed to pay Metrolinx’s application cost of $35,000 and appeal costs of $20,000.

Some residents neighbouring ML argue it's that court decision that could cause the concrete facility’s potential move.

Grimes does not agree.

“I don’t think that’s the case,” Grimes said. “It’s just an easement through their property. I’ve been told that won’t affect ML’s operations. That’s not going to shut them down, in my mind.”

Dan Irwin lives directly across the street from ML. He has led the community charge for the past decade to move the concrete plant out of the area.

Irwin said Friday he believes the court decision is forcing ML out.

“The city and Mark Grimes have nothing to do with the Metrolinx court judgment,” Irwin said.

Irwin said he is “relieved, but not really celebrating” the news ML could move out of his Mimico neighbourhood.

“I suppose this is still good news,” Irwin said. “As a homeowner directly across from this noxious, incompatible facility, my quality of life, enjoyment of our home, and health and well-being has been severely affected (by these) intolerable conditions for over 10 years.”

Irwin said he has many questions for the city about ML’s potential move.

“There are still many questions,” Irwin said. “What is the time frame? Will we still suffer from another summer from hell?”

Controversial Mimico concrete plant could move to eastern port lands: Grimes

Neighbouring residents have complained about dust, noise for past decade

News Jun 30, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

The controversial ML Ready Mix concrete plant that neighbouring Mimico residents complained for a decade causes dust, noise and quality-of-life issues could be moving out.

Etobicoke-Lakeshore Councillor Mark Grimes, who represents the area, said Friday a potential site for the concrete facility has been found in the city’s eastern port lands.

The eastern port lands is zoned heavy industrial. Years ago, Toronto council approved the area for use as a concrete facilities' campus.

“We found a site down in the port lands that is a compatible use that city planning supports,” Grimes said in an interview. “We still have a long way to go, but this is the first step toward removing ML from the Mimico community,” Grimes said.

Finalizing approvals and agreements for the new site will require a planning and negotiation process between city planners and ML Ready Mix principals, Grimes said. A company spokesperson declined to comment on this story.

Since 2007, neighbouring residents – some of whom live 20 feet from ML – have regularly complained about excessive noise and dust from the facility to the city and the Ministry of the Environment.

The ML Ready Mix facility at 29 Judson St. is on the south side of a residential street near the Mimico GO Train station, across from a park, seniors’ residence and adjacent houses.

The Guardian has been reporting on the facility and residents’ complaints about it for the past decade.

In recent years, Remicorp Industries Inc., which operates ML Ready Mix, and Metrolinx had submitted court applications against one another seeking a court decision on easements granted when Remicorp purchased a triangular-shaped piece of land from CNR in 2002.

The land, on the north side of the CNR tracks, is now Metrolinx property on Royal York Road fronting ML Ready Mix’s property.

The easements allow for access to maintenance of the railway tracks.

In 2016, a Superior Court of Justice decision ruled in favour of Remicorp, and dismissed Metrolinx’s application, finding Metrolinx had abandoned its easement.

Last month, a Court of Appeal for Ontario ruling overturned that decision and found in favour of Metrolinx. Remicorp was directed to pay Metrolinx’s application cost of $35,000 and appeal costs of $20,000.

Some residents neighbouring ML argue it's that court decision that could cause the concrete facility’s potential move.

Grimes does not agree.

“I don’t think that’s the case,” Grimes said. “It’s just an easement through their property. I’ve been told that won’t affect ML’s operations. That’s not going to shut them down, in my mind.”

Dan Irwin lives directly across the street from ML. He has led the community charge for the past decade to move the concrete plant out of the area.

Irwin said Friday he believes the court decision is forcing ML out.

“The city and Mark Grimes have nothing to do with the Metrolinx court judgment,” Irwin said.

Irwin said he is “relieved, but not really celebrating” the news ML could move out of his Mimico neighbourhood.

“I suppose this is still good news,” Irwin said. “As a homeowner directly across from this noxious, incompatible facility, my quality of life, enjoyment of our home, and health and well-being has been severely affected (by these) intolerable conditions for over 10 years.”

Irwin said he has many questions for the city about ML’s potential move.

“There are still many questions,” Irwin said. “What is the time frame? Will we still suffer from another summer from hell?”

Controversial Mimico concrete plant could move to eastern port lands: Grimes

Neighbouring residents have complained about dust, noise for past decade

News Jun 30, 2017 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

The controversial ML Ready Mix concrete plant that neighbouring Mimico residents complained for a decade causes dust, noise and quality-of-life issues could be moving out.

Etobicoke-Lakeshore Councillor Mark Grimes, who represents the area, said Friday a potential site for the concrete facility has been found in the city’s eastern port lands.

The eastern port lands is zoned heavy industrial. Years ago, Toronto council approved the area for use as a concrete facilities' campus.

“We found a site down in the port lands that is a compatible use that city planning supports,” Grimes said in an interview. “We still have a long way to go, but this is the first step toward removing ML from the Mimico community,” Grimes said.

Finalizing approvals and agreements for the new site will require a planning and negotiation process between city planners and ML Ready Mix principals, Grimes said. A company spokesperson declined to comment on this story.

Since 2007, neighbouring residents – some of whom live 20 feet from ML – have regularly complained about excessive noise and dust from the facility to the city and the Ministry of the Environment.

The ML Ready Mix facility at 29 Judson St. is on the south side of a residential street near the Mimico GO Train station, across from a park, seniors’ residence and adjacent houses.

The Guardian has been reporting on the facility and residents’ complaints about it for the past decade.

In recent years, Remicorp Industries Inc., which operates ML Ready Mix, and Metrolinx had submitted court applications against one another seeking a court decision on easements granted when Remicorp purchased a triangular-shaped piece of land from CNR in 2002.

The land, on the north side of the CNR tracks, is now Metrolinx property on Royal York Road fronting ML Ready Mix’s property.

The easements allow for access to maintenance of the railway tracks.

In 2016, a Superior Court of Justice decision ruled in favour of Remicorp, and dismissed Metrolinx’s application, finding Metrolinx had abandoned its easement.

Last month, a Court of Appeal for Ontario ruling overturned that decision and found in favour of Metrolinx. Remicorp was directed to pay Metrolinx’s application cost of $35,000 and appeal costs of $20,000.

Some residents neighbouring ML argue it's that court decision that could cause the concrete facility’s potential move.

Grimes does not agree.

“I don’t think that’s the case,” Grimes said. “It’s just an easement through their property. I’ve been told that won’t affect ML’s operations. That’s not going to shut them down, in my mind.”

Dan Irwin lives directly across the street from ML. He has led the community charge for the past decade to move the concrete plant out of the area.

Irwin said Friday he believes the court decision is forcing ML out.

“The city and Mark Grimes have nothing to do with the Metrolinx court judgment,” Irwin said.

Irwin said he is “relieved, but not really celebrating” the news ML could move out of his Mimico neighbourhood.

“I suppose this is still good news,” Irwin said. “As a homeowner directly across from this noxious, incompatible facility, my quality of life, enjoyment of our home, and health and well-being has been severely affected (by these) intolerable conditions for over 10 years.”

Irwin said he has many questions for the city about ML’s potential move.

“There are still many questions,” Irwin said. “What is the time frame? Will we still suffer from another summer from hell?”