Ontario Court of Appeal now deciding fate of Toronto's shisha bars

News Jun 09, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Toronto shisha bars owners await word on their businesses’ fate after a challenge to the city’s anti-hookah smoking bylaw reached the Ontario Court of Appeal this week.

A panel of three judges hearing the case Tuesday at Osgoode Hall reserved judgement, so it could be months before a ruling is made on whether Toronto’s ban on public hookah smoking is legal.

Meanwhile, shisha bars can continue to sell herbal shisha and provide water pipes, as the city has decided not to enforce the bylaw until the challenge is resolved.

Owners of shisha bars – some concentrated on the East Danforth and Scarborough’s Wexford Heights – say they make most of their money selling shisha, which they argue is no more damaging to health than alcohol, which they don’t serve.

The bylaw, they have argued, will effectively shut them down.

Last summer, however, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled the bylaw was valid because it’s within the city’s powers.

This week, Rob Cunningham, senior policy analyst for the Canadian Cancer Society, said the ban should be seen as closing a gap in Toronto’s smoking bylaw. “Secondhand smoke is secondhand smoke,” he said.

Other municipalities which banned water-pipe smoking in public places include Ottawa, Peel Region, Barrie and Peterborough.

Ontario Court of Appeal now deciding fate of Toronto's shisha bars

Bar owners say ban on hookah-smoking will shut them down

News Jun 09, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Toronto shisha bars owners await word on their businesses’ fate after a challenge to the city’s anti-hookah smoking bylaw reached the Ontario Court of Appeal this week.

A panel of three judges hearing the case Tuesday at Osgoode Hall reserved judgement, so it could be months before a ruling is made on whether Toronto’s ban on public hookah smoking is legal.

Meanwhile, shisha bars can continue to sell herbal shisha and provide water pipes, as the city has decided not to enforce the bylaw until the challenge is resolved.

Owners of shisha bars – some concentrated on the East Danforth and Scarborough’s Wexford Heights – say they make most of their money selling shisha, which they argue is no more damaging to health than alcohol, which they don’t serve.

The bylaw, they have argued, will effectively shut them down.

Last summer, however, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled the bylaw was valid because it’s within the city’s powers.

This week, Rob Cunningham, senior policy analyst for the Canadian Cancer Society, said the ban should be seen as closing a gap in Toronto’s smoking bylaw. “Secondhand smoke is secondhand smoke,” he said.

Other municipalities which banned water-pipe smoking in public places include Ottawa, Peel Region, Barrie and Peterborough.

Ontario Court of Appeal now deciding fate of Toronto's shisha bars

Bar owners say ban on hookah-smoking will shut them down

News Jun 09, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Toronto shisha bars owners await word on their businesses’ fate after a challenge to the city’s anti-hookah smoking bylaw reached the Ontario Court of Appeal this week.

A panel of three judges hearing the case Tuesday at Osgoode Hall reserved judgement, so it could be months before a ruling is made on whether Toronto’s ban on public hookah smoking is legal.

Meanwhile, shisha bars can continue to sell herbal shisha and provide water pipes, as the city has decided not to enforce the bylaw until the challenge is resolved.

Owners of shisha bars – some concentrated on the East Danforth and Scarborough’s Wexford Heights – say they make most of their money selling shisha, which they argue is no more damaging to health than alcohol, which they don’t serve.

The bylaw, they have argued, will effectively shut them down.

Last summer, however, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled the bylaw was valid because it’s within the city’s powers.

This week, Rob Cunningham, senior policy analyst for the Canadian Cancer Society, said the ban should be seen as closing a gap in Toronto’s smoking bylaw. “Secondhand smoke is secondhand smoke,” he said.

Other municipalities which banned water-pipe smoking in public places include Ottawa, Peel Region, Barrie and Peterborough.