Toronto students get interactive driving course on road safety

News May 24, 2017 by Hilary Caton York Guardian

As the weather slowly warms up, teen drivers will be itching to get in the car with friends and hit the open road. But, before that happens, Grade 10 and 11 students at Blessed Archbishop Romero Catholic Secondary School got a crash course on road safety, good driving habits and how to be proactive drivers.

With the help of The Sweet Life Road Show, put on by Teens Learn to Drive – a nonprofit corporation that aims to reduce teen death and injury from crashes – students rotated around 10 interactive stations. Each of the stations offered a different hands-on learning experience that used computer gaming, peer theatre and interactive group activities that focused on the top causes of teen driver crashes.

“Each station raises awareness about a risk and we help them understand how to stay safe. We’re not about ‘don’t do this’ or ‘don’t do that.’ We say, ‘these are the risks, and this is how you can stay safe,’” said Anne Marie Hayes, the president of Teens Learn to Drive.

Students in Grade 10 learned about the risks of driving under the influence of marijuana; how long alcohol can stay in your system; drowsy driving; the importance of seat belts in a rollover, with a demonstration; and distracted driving – to name a few. The information was shared by local police who stopped by, as well as youth volunteers.

“This (event) is cool because I want to go take my G1, so to know all these things beforehand is good,” said Julia Soares, a 17-year-old student in Grade 10 at the school.

“I think my classmates are all learning from this, because it's interesting stuff. I think it’s good that they brought it to the school instead of us going out and trying to find this kind of information.”

Hayes has heard a few teens admit to their poor driving habits, including letting a friend lay in the trunk while driving, driving while high and sharing a single seat belt between two people.

“You’d be surprised at what these teens are doing, and they’re doing it all the time, and don’t know that they shouldn’t be doing some of these things. This is why we’re here,” said Hayes.

The one-day event for the teens is the first time the Sweet Life Road Show has come to Blessed Archbishop Romero. The fact that the event is interactive is what drew child and youth worker Carlo Cassano and his co-worker Maria Ariganello-Arujo to hosting it.

“It’s better than to have someone just speak to you,” said Cassano. “That’s the traditional way, and this is so much better. They’re moving, they’re interacting, they’re engaged and trying things.

“They tune out if someone is just there talking.”

Ariganello-Arujo has been at the school for 27 years, and during her time there, four teens have died in a car accident. It’s something she hopes she won’t have to endure this summer.

“They don’t realize the dangers; they think they’re invincible,” Ariganello-Arujo said.

“I hope they learn from this event, and they apply the skills and knowledge learned here today.”

Toronto students get interactive driving course on road safety

News May 24, 2017 by Hilary Caton York Guardian

As the weather slowly warms up, teen drivers will be itching to get in the car with friends and hit the open road. But, before that happens, Grade 10 and 11 students at Blessed Archbishop Romero Catholic Secondary School got a crash course on road safety, good driving habits and how to be proactive drivers.

With the help of The Sweet Life Road Show, put on by Teens Learn to Drive – a nonprofit corporation that aims to reduce teen death and injury from crashes – students rotated around 10 interactive stations. Each of the stations offered a different hands-on learning experience that used computer gaming, peer theatre and interactive group activities that focused on the top causes of teen driver crashes.

“Each station raises awareness about a risk and we help them understand how to stay safe. We’re not about ‘don’t do this’ or ‘don’t do that.’ We say, ‘these are the risks, and this is how you can stay safe,’” said Anne Marie Hayes, the president of Teens Learn to Drive.

Students in Grade 10 learned about the risks of driving under the influence of marijuana; how long alcohol can stay in your system; drowsy driving; the importance of seat belts in a rollover, with a demonstration; and distracted driving – to name a few. The information was shared by local police who stopped by, as well as youth volunteers.

“This (event) is cool because I want to go take my G1, so to know all these things beforehand is good,” said Julia Soares, a 17-year-old student in Grade 10 at the school.

“I think my classmates are all learning from this, because it's interesting stuff. I think it’s good that they brought it to the school instead of us going out and trying to find this kind of information.”

Hayes has heard a few teens admit to their poor driving habits, including letting a friend lay in the trunk while driving, driving while high and sharing a single seat belt between two people.

“You’d be surprised at what these teens are doing, and they’re doing it all the time, and don’t know that they shouldn’t be doing some of these things. This is why we’re here,” said Hayes.

The one-day event for the teens is the first time the Sweet Life Road Show has come to Blessed Archbishop Romero. The fact that the event is interactive is what drew child and youth worker Carlo Cassano and his co-worker Maria Ariganello-Arujo to hosting it.

“It’s better than to have someone just speak to you,” said Cassano. “That’s the traditional way, and this is so much better. They’re moving, they’re interacting, they’re engaged and trying things.

“They tune out if someone is just there talking.”

Ariganello-Arujo has been at the school for 27 years, and during her time there, four teens have died in a car accident. It’s something she hopes she won’t have to endure this summer.

“They don’t realize the dangers; they think they’re invincible,” Ariganello-Arujo said.

“I hope they learn from this event, and they apply the skills and knowledge learned here today.”

Toronto students get interactive driving course on road safety

News May 24, 2017 by Hilary Caton York Guardian

As the weather slowly warms up, teen drivers will be itching to get in the car with friends and hit the open road. But, before that happens, Grade 10 and 11 students at Blessed Archbishop Romero Catholic Secondary School got a crash course on road safety, good driving habits and how to be proactive drivers.

With the help of The Sweet Life Road Show, put on by Teens Learn to Drive – a nonprofit corporation that aims to reduce teen death and injury from crashes – students rotated around 10 interactive stations. Each of the stations offered a different hands-on learning experience that used computer gaming, peer theatre and interactive group activities that focused on the top causes of teen driver crashes.

“Each station raises awareness about a risk and we help them understand how to stay safe. We’re not about ‘don’t do this’ or ‘don’t do that.’ We say, ‘these are the risks, and this is how you can stay safe,’” said Anne Marie Hayes, the president of Teens Learn to Drive.

Students in Grade 10 learned about the risks of driving under the influence of marijuana; how long alcohol can stay in your system; drowsy driving; the importance of seat belts in a rollover, with a demonstration; and distracted driving – to name a few. The information was shared by local police who stopped by, as well as youth volunteers.

“This (event) is cool because I want to go take my G1, so to know all these things beforehand is good,” said Julia Soares, a 17-year-old student in Grade 10 at the school.

“I think my classmates are all learning from this, because it's interesting stuff. I think it’s good that they brought it to the school instead of us going out and trying to find this kind of information.”

Hayes has heard a few teens admit to their poor driving habits, including letting a friend lay in the trunk while driving, driving while high and sharing a single seat belt between two people.

“You’d be surprised at what these teens are doing, and they’re doing it all the time, and don’t know that they shouldn’t be doing some of these things. This is why we’re here,” said Hayes.

The one-day event for the teens is the first time the Sweet Life Road Show has come to Blessed Archbishop Romero. The fact that the event is interactive is what drew child and youth worker Carlo Cassano and his co-worker Maria Ariganello-Arujo to hosting it.

“It’s better than to have someone just speak to you,” said Cassano. “That’s the traditional way, and this is so much better. They’re moving, they’re interacting, they’re engaged and trying things.

“They tune out if someone is just there talking.”

Ariganello-Arujo has been at the school for 27 years, and during her time there, four teens have died in a car accident. It’s something she hopes she won’t have to endure this summer.

“They don’t realize the dangers; they think they’re invincible,” Ariganello-Arujo said.

“I hope they learn from this event, and they apply the skills and knowledge learned here today.”