TTC subway relief line needs close to $7-billion for eight stations: report

News May 09, 2017 City Centre Mirror

The first phase of a relief subway line urgently needed to ease capacity issues throughout the TTC rapid transit network is estimated to cost at least $6.8-billion for eight new stations from Pape Avenue to Queen Street, according to a new staff report.

The report  http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-103533.pdf recommends approving the alignment as well as  advance planning and design for the first phase of the project, Relief Line South, as well as a future northern extension to either Eglinton or Sheppard avenues in collaboration with Metrolinx.

“Demand forecasting to-date indicates that Line 1 will be at capacity in 2031 and the Relief Line South will be required,” states the report which was released Tuesday, May 9. “These projections also indicate that a future extension of the Relief Line North to Sheppard Avenue would provide benefits over the longer-term. “

The report also recommends continuing with planning and design of the contentious Yonge Subway Extension, which would span 7.4 kilometres north from Finch into Richmond Hill. Both the TTC and Mayor John Tory have emphatically stated multiple times the Relief Line needs to be built before the Yonge extension, and the report demands assurances from both York Region and Metrolinx, Toronto will not have to contribute a cent to a project intended to primarily benefit the 905.

The report calls for further analysis of future subway ridership as far away as 2041 in consultation with Metrolinx, and for assurances the TTC will manage and deliver the project. Staff estimates the Yonge North’s initial cost at $5.6-billion for five new stations.

There is currently no funding attached to the relief line beyond $100-million in planning and design expenses previously provided by the province and the city, whose contributions are 50 per cent covered by federal funding. The report seeks to have funding partners in place as well as a final project budget approved by the end of 2019.

The report will be debated by the mayor’s Executive committee next week and Toronto Council as a whole later in the month.

TTC subway relief line needs close to $7-billion for eight stations: report

News May 09, 2017 City Centre Mirror

The first phase of a relief subway line urgently needed to ease capacity issues throughout the TTC rapid transit network is estimated to cost at least $6.8-billion for eight new stations from Pape Avenue to Queen Street, according to a new staff report.

The report  http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-103533.pdf recommends approving the alignment as well as  advance planning and design for the first phase of the project, Relief Line South, as well as a future northern extension to either Eglinton or Sheppard avenues in collaboration with Metrolinx.

“Demand forecasting to-date indicates that Line 1 will be at capacity in 2031 and the Relief Line South will be required,” states the report which was released Tuesday, May 9. “These projections also indicate that a future extension of the Relief Line North to Sheppard Avenue would provide benefits over the longer-term. “

The report also recommends continuing with planning and design of the contentious Yonge Subway Extension, which would span 7.4 kilometres north from Finch into Richmond Hill. Both the TTC and Mayor John Tory have emphatically stated multiple times the Relief Line needs to be built before the Yonge extension, and the report demands assurances from both York Region and Metrolinx, Toronto will not have to contribute a cent to a project intended to primarily benefit the 905.

The report calls for further analysis of future subway ridership as far away as 2041 in consultation with Metrolinx, and for assurances the TTC will manage and deliver the project. Staff estimates the Yonge North’s initial cost at $5.6-billion for five new stations.

There is currently no funding attached to the relief line beyond $100-million in planning and design expenses previously provided by the province and the city, whose contributions are 50 per cent covered by federal funding. The report seeks to have funding partners in place as well as a final project budget approved by the end of 2019.

The report will be debated by the mayor’s Executive committee next week and Toronto Council as a whole later in the month.

TTC subway relief line needs close to $7-billion for eight stations: report

News May 09, 2017 City Centre Mirror

The first phase of a relief subway line urgently needed to ease capacity issues throughout the TTC rapid transit network is estimated to cost at least $6.8-billion for eight new stations from Pape Avenue to Queen Street, according to a new staff report.

The report  http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-103533.pdf recommends approving the alignment as well as  advance planning and design for the first phase of the project, Relief Line South, as well as a future northern extension to either Eglinton or Sheppard avenues in collaboration with Metrolinx.

“Demand forecasting to-date indicates that Line 1 will be at capacity in 2031 and the Relief Line South will be required,” states the report which was released Tuesday, May 9. “These projections also indicate that a future extension of the Relief Line North to Sheppard Avenue would provide benefits over the longer-term. “

The report also recommends continuing with planning and design of the contentious Yonge Subway Extension, which would span 7.4 kilometres north from Finch into Richmond Hill. Both the TTC and Mayor John Tory have emphatically stated multiple times the Relief Line needs to be built before the Yonge extension, and the report demands assurances from both York Region and Metrolinx, Toronto will not have to contribute a cent to a project intended to primarily benefit the 905.

The report calls for further analysis of future subway ridership as far away as 2041 in consultation with Metrolinx, and for assurances the TTC will manage and deliver the project. Staff estimates the Yonge North’s initial cost at $5.6-billion for five new stations.

There is currently no funding attached to the relief line beyond $100-million in planning and design expenses previously provided by the province and the city, whose contributions are 50 per cent covered by federal funding. The report seeks to have funding partners in place as well as a final project budget approved by the end of 2019.

The report will be debated by the mayor’s Executive committee next week and Toronto Council as a whole later in the month.