Downsview Park part of Highway of Heroes Living Tribute

News Apr 23, 2017 by Justin Skinner North York Mirror

The sacrifices made by the 117,000 Canadian servicemen and women who gave their lives in military conflict since Confederation will never be forgotten, and a new initiative coinciding with Earth Day festivities aims to ensure their loss will remain front of mind.

Trees were planted in honour of each and every one of those soldiers along Highway 401, with 2,000 being planted in Downsview Park on Sunday, April 23.

Those trees – known as the Highway of Heroes Living Tribute – are part of two million native trees planted in recognition of Canadian military men and women.

At a tree planting ceremony at Downsview on Sunday, Highway of Heroes Living Tribute chair Mark Cullen said the plantings will take place between CFB Trenton and the Coroner’s Office at Keele and Wilson, a stretch of highway known as the Highway of Heroes. Fallen soldiers have been driven along that route and honoured by Canadians overlooking their journey from bridges along the way.

“It became a place of special significance when thousands of Canadians stood silently and they contemplated our cost of freedom,” he said. “158 times during the Afghan conflict this happened – Canadian personnel flown home to be repatriated here on the soil of their homeland.”

The two million trees will all be planted within a kilometre of the Highway of Heroes.

Cullen pointed out that the trees will add greenery along the stretch of road and stand as a living memorial to Canada’s fallen military members. He noted the plantings will consist of “native trees that will mature into a beauty, a reminder for generations to come of the sacrifice for peace made by so many.”

Ken Jewett of Maple Leaves Forever, a charity that promotes the planting of Canadian maple trees across Southern Ontario and that contributed to the Living Tribute initiative, said he was moved upon visiting Europe and seeing rows of gravestones for fallen soldiers.

“It’s so important we remember all the men and women who gave their lives to preserve our way of life,” he said. “Highway of Heroes brings those losses to our doorstep.”

York Centre MP Michael Levitt noted Downsview Park is an ideal site for the plantings as a former Air Force base.

“The initiative we’re planting trees for today…is a special kind of memorial,” he said. “It aims to make remembrance an act of living memory. The trees we’re planting today will be that reminder and as they live on and as they grow, they will help to ensure that our remembrance lives on too.”

He added that the trees will make public spaces like Downsview Park more beautiful and enjoyable for the public.

Hundreds came out to help with the plantings, including Jane Pancer, who attended with her son and stepson. Pancer said her grandfather served in World War II, and the tree plantings were a way of paying tribute to him and others who fought.

“It’s a show of respect for the troops and a thank you to the troops,” she said.

For more information on the initiative, visit www.hohtribute.ca

Downsview Park part of Highway of Heroes Living Tribute

Two-thousand trees planted along Highway of Heroes

News Apr 23, 2017 by Justin Skinner North York Mirror

The sacrifices made by the 117,000 Canadian servicemen and women who gave their lives in military conflict since Confederation will never be forgotten, and a new initiative coinciding with Earth Day festivities aims to ensure their loss will remain front of mind.

Trees were planted in honour of each and every one of those soldiers along Highway 401, with 2,000 being planted in Downsview Park on Sunday, April 23.

Those trees – known as the Highway of Heroes Living Tribute – are part of two million native trees planted in recognition of Canadian military men and women.

At a tree planting ceremony at Downsview on Sunday, Highway of Heroes Living Tribute chair Mark Cullen said the plantings will take place between CFB Trenton and the Coroner’s Office at Keele and Wilson, a stretch of highway known as the Highway of Heroes. Fallen soldiers have been driven along that route and honoured by Canadians overlooking their journey from bridges along the way.

“It became a place of special significance when thousands of Canadians stood silently and they contemplated our cost of freedom,” he said. “158 times during the Afghan conflict this happened – Canadian personnel flown home to be repatriated here on the soil of their homeland.”

The two million trees will all be planted within a kilometre of the Highway of Heroes.

Cullen pointed out that the trees will add greenery along the stretch of road and stand as a living memorial to Canada’s fallen military members. He noted the plantings will consist of “native trees that will mature into a beauty, a reminder for generations to come of the sacrifice for peace made by so many.”

Ken Jewett of Maple Leaves Forever, a charity that promotes the planting of Canadian maple trees across Southern Ontario and that contributed to the Living Tribute initiative, said he was moved upon visiting Europe and seeing rows of gravestones for fallen soldiers.

“It’s so important we remember all the men and women who gave their lives to preserve our way of life,” he said. “Highway of Heroes brings those losses to our doorstep.”

York Centre MP Michael Levitt noted Downsview Park is an ideal site for the plantings as a former Air Force base.

“The initiative we’re planting trees for today…is a special kind of memorial,” he said. “It aims to make remembrance an act of living memory. The trees we’re planting today will be that reminder and as they live on and as they grow, they will help to ensure that our remembrance lives on too.”

He added that the trees will make public spaces like Downsview Park more beautiful and enjoyable for the public.

Hundreds came out to help with the plantings, including Jane Pancer, who attended with her son and stepson. Pancer said her grandfather served in World War II, and the tree plantings were a way of paying tribute to him and others who fought.

“It’s a show of respect for the troops and a thank you to the troops,” she said.

For more information on the initiative, visit www.hohtribute.ca

Downsview Park part of Highway of Heroes Living Tribute

Two-thousand trees planted along Highway of Heroes

News Apr 23, 2017 by Justin Skinner North York Mirror

The sacrifices made by the 117,000 Canadian servicemen and women who gave their lives in military conflict since Confederation will never be forgotten, and a new initiative coinciding with Earth Day festivities aims to ensure their loss will remain front of mind.

Trees were planted in honour of each and every one of those soldiers along Highway 401, with 2,000 being planted in Downsview Park on Sunday, April 23.

Those trees – known as the Highway of Heroes Living Tribute – are part of two million native trees planted in recognition of Canadian military men and women.

At a tree planting ceremony at Downsview on Sunday, Highway of Heroes Living Tribute chair Mark Cullen said the plantings will take place between CFB Trenton and the Coroner’s Office at Keele and Wilson, a stretch of highway known as the Highway of Heroes. Fallen soldiers have been driven along that route and honoured by Canadians overlooking their journey from bridges along the way.

“It became a place of special significance when thousands of Canadians stood silently and they contemplated our cost of freedom,” he said. “158 times during the Afghan conflict this happened – Canadian personnel flown home to be repatriated here on the soil of their homeland.”

The two million trees will all be planted within a kilometre of the Highway of Heroes.

Cullen pointed out that the trees will add greenery along the stretch of road and stand as a living memorial to Canada’s fallen military members. He noted the plantings will consist of “native trees that will mature into a beauty, a reminder for generations to come of the sacrifice for peace made by so many.”

Ken Jewett of Maple Leaves Forever, a charity that promotes the planting of Canadian maple trees across Southern Ontario and that contributed to the Living Tribute initiative, said he was moved upon visiting Europe and seeing rows of gravestones for fallen soldiers.

“It’s so important we remember all the men and women who gave their lives to preserve our way of life,” he said. “Highway of Heroes brings those losses to our doorstep.”

York Centre MP Michael Levitt noted Downsview Park is an ideal site for the plantings as a former Air Force base.

“The initiative we’re planting trees for today…is a special kind of memorial,” he said. “It aims to make remembrance an act of living memory. The trees we’re planting today will be that reminder and as they live on and as they grow, they will help to ensure that our remembrance lives on too.”

He added that the trees will make public spaces like Downsview Park more beautiful and enjoyable for the public.

Hundreds came out to help with the plantings, including Jane Pancer, who attended with her son and stepson. Pancer said her grandfather served in World War II, and the tree plantings were a way of paying tribute to him and others who fought.

“It’s a show of respect for the troops and a thank you to the troops,” she said.

For more information on the initiative, visit www.hohtribute.ca