Twin condo tower proposal at King and Dufferin frustrates residents

News Apr 20, 2017 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

Despite what city planners and Lifetime Developments are calling “significant revisions,” a tandem 17-and 14-storey condominium proposal at King and Dufferin Streets still has Parkdale residents crying foul.

“It’s just too damn big,” Bill Pigott, a resident on Melbourne Avenue told the developers point blank at a community consultation meeting held at Holy Family Community Centre Tuesday night.

“They’ve made nice changes to what they presented a year and half ago, but there’s a fundamental issue here … height, density and mass. Folks would be a lot more comfortable with something that’s close to what we already got that’s in scale with the neighbourhood.”

The revised pair of buildings proposed at the already congested Parkdale intersection, stands at 17-storeys at 1182 King St. W and 14-storeys at 1221 King St. W with commercial retail space at the bottom of each and three levels of underground parking for residents, visitors and retail customers.

Residents agree both sites should be redeveloped, but they also made it clear that the proposal in front of them is not what they had in mind. However, according to Ward 14 (Parkdale-High Park) councillor Gord Perks, “they get to build something” and intensification is coming to that corner no matter what, but it’s a matter of finding the right fit.

Lifetime Developments' original proposal that was brought to the community a year and a half ago had 21-and 19-storey condo buildings at the northeast (1182) and southwest corners (1221) of King and Dufferin.

Currently the northeast corner is home to Island Foods, Burger King, Starbucks, Washworld Coin Laundry and Pet Valu. At the southwest corner is home to the McDonald’s.  Both are low-rise one-storey buildings, which Peter Smith, the land use planner for Lifetime Developments calls “anomalies in the city” which is why it “makes sense to redesign the corners,” he said.

Initially both developments were proposed to be made mostly of glass, and consisted of 78 per cent one-bedroom units. However, Lifetime Developments revised their proposal to include a lowered height, 48 fewer units and added brick elements to the design to “be more respectful of the context of the area,” according to Smith. Combined, the new proposal has 701 residential units with roughly 29 per cent (204) two and three-bedroom units. It is also increasing the King and Dufferin Parkette near 1221 King St W. by a few metres.

“They’ve certainly made some very big moves and it’s a very different proposal from the last one,” said Perks, who exclusively told the Villager in a previous article the two condos, “stuck out like a pair of sore thumbs.”

But despite the “well-intended” revisions, noted by the community, neither will have any affordable housing units. It’s a factor that Joshua Barndt, the development co-ordinator of the Parkdale Neighbourhood Land Trust, a community organization fighting for more affordable housing in the area, pointed out to developers. Barndt called that “insulting” because the area is in desperate need of such housing. However, according to the local councillor Gord Perks the developer is under no obligation to provide such housing.

“We cannot make them do affordable housing here, we can ask them, we can encourage them, we can remind them but we can’t make them,” Perks said.

“The city has no way to tell them that they must do affordable housing.”

He also told residents “not to be fooled” by the idea of receiving Section 37 funds from developers to help secure affordable housing in the development because it does not amount to “a lot of money”

Aside from height, mass and density, residents raised concerns regarding the congested streetcar stop at the corner in relation to the 504 King streetcar, overdevelopment and the lack of a smooth esthetic transition into Parkdale.

“Development pressures are really being felt by the community. I think this one sets the precedent because they keep looking across the tracks and at Liberty Village and saying, ‘look at what they’ve done over there,’” said Ric Amis, the secretary of the Parkdale Residents Association.

“But that was a brown field, there was nothing there. Here you’re coming into an existing neighbourhood and you have to take that into consideration and I don’t think they are … an  appropriate height at these corners would be eight-storeys with step backs.”

City staff will draft a report that will go to the Toronto East York Community Council in June or September.

Twin condo tower proposal at King and Dufferin frustrates residents

News Apr 20, 2017 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

Despite what city planners and Lifetime Developments are calling “significant revisions,” a tandem 17-and 14-storey condominium proposal at King and Dufferin Streets still has Parkdale residents crying foul.

“It’s just too damn big,” Bill Pigott, a resident on Melbourne Avenue told the developers point blank at a community consultation meeting held at Holy Family Community Centre Tuesday night.

“They’ve made nice changes to what they presented a year and half ago, but there’s a fundamental issue here … height, density and mass. Folks would be a lot more comfortable with something that’s close to what we already got that’s in scale with the neighbourhood.”

The revised pair of buildings proposed at the already congested Parkdale intersection, stands at 17-storeys at 1182 King St. W and 14-storeys at 1221 King St. W with commercial retail space at the bottom of each and three levels of underground parking for residents, visitors and retail customers.

Residents agree both sites should be redeveloped, but they also made it clear that the proposal in front of them is not what they had in mind. However, according to Ward 14 (Parkdale-High Park) councillor Gord Perks, “they get to build something” and intensification is coming to that corner no matter what, but it’s a matter of finding the right fit.

Lifetime Developments' original proposal that was brought to the community a year and a half ago had 21-and 19-storey condo buildings at the northeast (1182) and southwest corners (1221) of King and Dufferin.

Currently the northeast corner is home to Island Foods, Burger King, Starbucks, Washworld Coin Laundry and Pet Valu. At the southwest corner is home to the McDonald’s.  Both are low-rise one-storey buildings, which Peter Smith, the land use planner for Lifetime Developments calls “anomalies in the city” which is why it “makes sense to redesign the corners,” he said.

Initially both developments were proposed to be made mostly of glass, and consisted of 78 per cent one-bedroom units. However, Lifetime Developments revised their proposal to include a lowered height, 48 fewer units and added brick elements to the design to “be more respectful of the context of the area,” according to Smith. Combined, the new proposal has 701 residential units with roughly 29 per cent (204) two and three-bedroom units. It is also increasing the King and Dufferin Parkette near 1221 King St W. by a few metres.

“They’ve certainly made some very big moves and it’s a very different proposal from the last one,” said Perks, who exclusively told the Villager in a previous article the two condos, “stuck out like a pair of sore thumbs.”

But despite the “well-intended” revisions, noted by the community, neither will have any affordable housing units. It’s a factor that Joshua Barndt, the development co-ordinator of the Parkdale Neighbourhood Land Trust, a community organization fighting for more affordable housing in the area, pointed out to developers. Barndt called that “insulting” because the area is in desperate need of such housing. However, according to the local councillor Gord Perks the developer is under no obligation to provide such housing.

“We cannot make them do affordable housing here, we can ask them, we can encourage them, we can remind them but we can’t make them,” Perks said.

“The city has no way to tell them that they must do affordable housing.”

He also told residents “not to be fooled” by the idea of receiving Section 37 funds from developers to help secure affordable housing in the development because it does not amount to “a lot of money”

Aside from height, mass and density, residents raised concerns regarding the congested streetcar stop at the corner in relation to the 504 King streetcar, overdevelopment and the lack of a smooth esthetic transition into Parkdale.

“Development pressures are really being felt by the community. I think this one sets the precedent because they keep looking across the tracks and at Liberty Village and saying, ‘look at what they’ve done over there,’” said Ric Amis, the secretary of the Parkdale Residents Association.

“But that was a brown field, there was nothing there. Here you’re coming into an existing neighbourhood and you have to take that into consideration and I don’t think they are … an  appropriate height at these corners would be eight-storeys with step backs.”

City staff will draft a report that will go to the Toronto East York Community Council in June or September.

Twin condo tower proposal at King and Dufferin frustrates residents

News Apr 20, 2017 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

Despite what city planners and Lifetime Developments are calling “significant revisions,” a tandem 17-and 14-storey condominium proposal at King and Dufferin Streets still has Parkdale residents crying foul.

“It’s just too damn big,” Bill Pigott, a resident on Melbourne Avenue told the developers point blank at a community consultation meeting held at Holy Family Community Centre Tuesday night.

“They’ve made nice changes to what they presented a year and half ago, but there’s a fundamental issue here … height, density and mass. Folks would be a lot more comfortable with something that’s close to what we already got that’s in scale with the neighbourhood.”

The revised pair of buildings proposed at the already congested Parkdale intersection, stands at 17-storeys at 1182 King St. W and 14-storeys at 1221 King St. W with commercial retail space at the bottom of each and three levels of underground parking for residents, visitors and retail customers.

Residents agree both sites should be redeveloped, but they also made it clear that the proposal in front of them is not what they had in mind. However, according to Ward 14 (Parkdale-High Park) councillor Gord Perks, “they get to build something” and intensification is coming to that corner no matter what, but it’s a matter of finding the right fit.

Lifetime Developments' original proposal that was brought to the community a year and a half ago had 21-and 19-storey condo buildings at the northeast (1182) and southwest corners (1221) of King and Dufferin.

Currently the northeast corner is home to Island Foods, Burger King, Starbucks, Washworld Coin Laundry and Pet Valu. At the southwest corner is home to the McDonald’s.  Both are low-rise one-storey buildings, which Peter Smith, the land use planner for Lifetime Developments calls “anomalies in the city” which is why it “makes sense to redesign the corners,” he said.

Initially both developments were proposed to be made mostly of glass, and consisted of 78 per cent one-bedroom units. However, Lifetime Developments revised their proposal to include a lowered height, 48 fewer units and added brick elements to the design to “be more respectful of the context of the area,” according to Smith. Combined, the new proposal has 701 residential units with roughly 29 per cent (204) two and three-bedroom units. It is also increasing the King and Dufferin Parkette near 1221 King St W. by a few metres.

“They’ve certainly made some very big moves and it’s a very different proposal from the last one,” said Perks, who exclusively told the Villager in a previous article the two condos, “stuck out like a pair of sore thumbs.”

But despite the “well-intended” revisions, noted by the community, neither will have any affordable housing units. It’s a factor that Joshua Barndt, the development co-ordinator of the Parkdale Neighbourhood Land Trust, a community organization fighting for more affordable housing in the area, pointed out to developers. Barndt called that “insulting” because the area is in desperate need of such housing. However, according to the local councillor Gord Perks the developer is under no obligation to provide such housing.

“We cannot make them do affordable housing here, we can ask them, we can encourage them, we can remind them but we can’t make them,” Perks said.

“The city has no way to tell them that they must do affordable housing.”

He also told residents “not to be fooled” by the idea of receiving Section 37 funds from developers to help secure affordable housing in the development because it does not amount to “a lot of money”

Aside from height, mass and density, residents raised concerns regarding the congested streetcar stop at the corner in relation to the 504 King streetcar, overdevelopment and the lack of a smooth esthetic transition into Parkdale.

“Development pressures are really being felt by the community. I think this one sets the precedent because they keep looking across the tracks and at Liberty Village and saying, ‘look at what they’ve done over there,’” said Ric Amis, the secretary of the Parkdale Residents Association.

“But that was a brown field, there was nothing there. Here you’re coming into an existing neighbourhood and you have to take that into consideration and I don’t think they are … an  appropriate height at these corners would be eight-storeys with step backs.”

City staff will draft a report that will go to the Toronto East York Community Council in June or September.