East Scarborough partners hope Sir Robert Borden BTI can serve as hub

News Apr 20, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Community partners are coming together to save Sir Robert L. Borden Business and Technical Institute, turning the closed East Scarborough school into a public hub.

They’ve got a big hill to climb: the Borden property on Poplar Road in West Hill is valued at $46 million, and the Toronto District School Board is required to get market value for it.

Paul Ainsile, the local councillor, says he’s determined to cobble together enough money to save what he believes can be a useful resource centre.

So far, he said, he’s met with representatives from trade unions, the East Scarborough Storefront, the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough and other groups to work on a proposal.

He’s also appealed to Scarborough MPPs, knowing the area around Borden includes what the City of Toronto calls Neighbourhood Improvement Areas — districts where youth unemployment is high.

“With a provincial budget coming this month, I’m still hoping,” Ainslie said last week, adding governments have “got to find jobs for youth, and I think this is a perfect opportunity.”

Part of his argument is the fact Scarborough has no centre for learning trades, and Borden can become one. Local students enrolled in trades, Ainslie said, have been “pretty despondent, upset, frustrated” at having to travel to the city’s west end, where such facilities are.

For a time, Orlando Franklin, an NFL star raised in Scarborough who attended Borden, was part of the effort to save it.

There were reports the Los Angeles Charger had bought the Scarborough Minor Football Association, and was looking to find it a permanent home, but in a television interview last week, Franklin said the sale is off.

Claire Crossley, a Scarborough resident and founding partner of the non-profit Academy of Learning, Strength and Conditioning for student athletes, has, however, said she’s part of the effort to make Borden a hub providing programs and services to anyone who needs them.

Harvest Call Ministries, a Port Union-based church, is another potential partner.

“We have the desire to work with Coun. Ainslie and Claire Crossley’s team to facilitate a community hub that would see a recreation and sports centre, a daycare centre and a trades facility established in the community,” Pastor Ekron Malcolm wrote last week.

Jerry Chadwick, local public school trustee, said a hub at Borden, which is south of Kingston Road and west of Morningside Avenue, “would be a best-case scenario for the community,” but he also warned “the property is assessed at a very high value.”

The school was closed last June, becoming the last of Scarborough’s three former business and technical institutes to be shut down by the board.

If the city doesn’t buy it, Borden goes to the open market.

Ainslie said the city doesn’t have enough money to buy Borden. If there’s no workable hub proposal, developers will likely “pound 500 townhouses” onto the site “and be on their merry way,” he said.

East Scarborough partners hope Sir Robert Borden BTI can serve as hub

Local councillor, unions, Port Union church all join effort

News Apr 20, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Community partners are coming together to save Sir Robert L. Borden Business and Technical Institute, turning the closed East Scarborough school into a public hub.

They’ve got a big hill to climb: the Borden property on Poplar Road in West Hill is valued at $46 million, and the Toronto District School Board is required to get market value for it.

Paul Ainsile, the local councillor, says he’s determined to cobble together enough money to save what he believes can be a useful resource centre.

So far, he said, he’s met with representatives from trade unions, the East Scarborough Storefront, the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough and other groups to work on a proposal.

He’s also appealed to Scarborough MPPs, knowing the area around Borden includes what the City of Toronto calls Neighbourhood Improvement Areas — districts where youth unemployment is high.

“With a provincial budget coming this month, I’m still hoping,” Ainslie said last week, adding governments have “got to find jobs for youth, and I think this is a perfect opportunity.”

Part of his argument is the fact Scarborough has no centre for learning trades, and Borden can become one. Local students enrolled in trades, Ainslie said, have been “pretty despondent, upset, frustrated” at having to travel to the city’s west end, where such facilities are.

For a time, Orlando Franklin, an NFL star raised in Scarborough who attended Borden, was part of the effort to save it.

There were reports the Los Angeles Charger had bought the Scarborough Minor Football Association, and was looking to find it a permanent home, but in a television interview last week, Franklin said the sale is off.

Claire Crossley, a Scarborough resident and founding partner of the non-profit Academy of Learning, Strength and Conditioning for student athletes, has, however, said she’s part of the effort to make Borden a hub providing programs and services to anyone who needs them.

Harvest Call Ministries, a Port Union-based church, is another potential partner.

“We have the desire to work with Coun. Ainslie and Claire Crossley’s team to facilitate a community hub that would see a recreation and sports centre, a daycare centre and a trades facility established in the community,” Pastor Ekron Malcolm wrote last week.

Jerry Chadwick, local public school trustee, said a hub at Borden, which is south of Kingston Road and west of Morningside Avenue, “would be a best-case scenario for the community,” but he also warned “the property is assessed at a very high value.”

The school was closed last June, becoming the last of Scarborough’s three former business and technical institutes to be shut down by the board.

If the city doesn’t buy it, Borden goes to the open market.

Ainslie said the city doesn’t have enough money to buy Borden. If there’s no workable hub proposal, developers will likely “pound 500 townhouses” onto the site “and be on their merry way,” he said.

East Scarborough partners hope Sir Robert Borden BTI can serve as hub

Local councillor, unions, Port Union church all join effort

News Apr 20, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Community partners are coming together to save Sir Robert L. Borden Business and Technical Institute, turning the closed East Scarborough school into a public hub.

They’ve got a big hill to climb: the Borden property on Poplar Road in West Hill is valued at $46 million, and the Toronto District School Board is required to get market value for it.

Paul Ainsile, the local councillor, says he’s determined to cobble together enough money to save what he believes can be a useful resource centre.

So far, he said, he’s met with representatives from trade unions, the East Scarborough Storefront, the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough and other groups to work on a proposal.

He’s also appealed to Scarborough MPPs, knowing the area around Borden includes what the City of Toronto calls Neighbourhood Improvement Areas — districts where youth unemployment is high.

“With a provincial budget coming this month, I’m still hoping,” Ainslie said last week, adding governments have “got to find jobs for youth, and I think this is a perfect opportunity.”

Part of his argument is the fact Scarborough has no centre for learning trades, and Borden can become one. Local students enrolled in trades, Ainslie said, have been “pretty despondent, upset, frustrated” at having to travel to the city’s west end, where such facilities are.

For a time, Orlando Franklin, an NFL star raised in Scarborough who attended Borden, was part of the effort to save it.

There were reports the Los Angeles Charger had bought the Scarborough Minor Football Association, and was looking to find it a permanent home, but in a television interview last week, Franklin said the sale is off.

Claire Crossley, a Scarborough resident and founding partner of the non-profit Academy of Learning, Strength and Conditioning for student athletes, has, however, said she’s part of the effort to make Borden a hub providing programs and services to anyone who needs them.

Harvest Call Ministries, a Port Union-based church, is another potential partner.

“We have the desire to work with Coun. Ainslie and Claire Crossley’s team to facilitate a community hub that would see a recreation and sports centre, a daycare centre and a trades facility established in the community,” Pastor Ekron Malcolm wrote last week.

Jerry Chadwick, local public school trustee, said a hub at Borden, which is south of Kingston Road and west of Morningside Avenue, “would be a best-case scenario for the community,” but he also warned “the property is assessed at a very high value.”

The school was closed last June, becoming the last of Scarborough’s three former business and technical institutes to be shut down by the board.

If the city doesn’t buy it, Borden goes to the open market.

Ainslie said the city doesn’t have enough money to buy Borden. If there’s no workable hub proposal, developers will likely “pound 500 townhouses” onto the site “and be on their merry way,” he said.