Finance Minister Sousa pledges help for seniors in budget

News Apr 13, 2017 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

At a downtown business lunch meeting April 13, Ontario’s Finance Minister Charles Sousa offered some hints of what to expect from the 2017 provincial budget when it’s released April 27.

The budget, said Sousa, will be balanced for 2017, and there won’t be new taxes on families, and will include a major “booster shot” for health care funding and more gas tax funding for transit infrastructure.

And while Sousa said he wouldn’t be offering more specific predictions prior to the budget’s release, he said that bus-riding seniors over the age of 65 would be receiving a tax refund for their transit costs.

“We’re just trying to find more affordability, measures that make life a little bit easier for seniors,” Sousa told reporters outside the Empire Club of Canada luncheon in downtown Toronto.

“Seniors in my community are looking for accommodations and city councillors have been talking about how to support seniors,” he said.

The budget is likely the second-last budget for the Liberal government before the 2018 election, and Sousa was anxious to portray it as largely a good-news budget. He noted that the economy in Ontario is proving robust, and reminded the audience at several points that the budget would be a balanced one.

And later, when asked by reporters whether there would be any new taxes on families in the budget, he was blunt.

“No,” he said. “We’re coming to a balanced budget. The people of Ontario have worked hard. We’ve taken steps to balance the budget and we want this balance to ensure that families succeed. We’re moving forward, and the principle that has guided me is, how do we improve families lives?”

Sousa also made it clear in the speech that the budget would include a boost for health care and public transit.

He said there would be “more resources through gas tax funding for communities to build transit and infrastructure, (and) because of our balanced approach there will be significantly more investments in our universal health care.”

Ontario's finance minister promises help for seniors, health care in budget

News Apr 13, 2017 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

At a downtown business lunch meeting April 13, Ontario’s Finance Minister Charles Sousa offered some hints of what to expect from the 2017 provincial budget when it’s released April 27.

The budget, said Sousa, will be balanced for 2017, and there won’t be new taxes on families, and will include a major “booster shot” for health care funding and more gas tax funding for transit infrastructure.

And while Sousa said he wouldn’t be offering more specific predictions prior to the budget’s release, he said that bus-riding seniors over the age of 65 would be receiving a tax refund for their transit costs.

“We’re just trying to find more affordability, measures that make life a little bit easier for seniors,” Sousa told reporters outside the Empire Club of Canada luncheon in downtown Toronto.

“Seniors in my community are looking for accommodations and city councillors have been talking about how to support seniors,” he said.

The budget is likely the second-last budget for the Liberal government before the 2018 election, and Sousa was anxious to portray it as largely a good-news budget. He noted that the economy in Ontario is proving robust, and reminded the audience at several points that the budget would be a balanced one.

And later, when asked by reporters whether there would be any new taxes on families in the budget, he was blunt.

“No,” he said. “We’re coming to a balanced budget. The people of Ontario have worked hard. We’ve taken steps to balance the budget and we want this balance to ensure that families succeed. We’re moving forward, and the principle that has guided me is, how do we improve families lives?”

Sousa also made it clear in the speech that the budget would include a boost for health care and public transit.

He said there would be “more resources through gas tax funding for communities to build transit and infrastructure, (and) because of our balanced approach there will be significantly more investments in our universal health care.”

Ontario's finance minister promises help for seniors, health care in budget

News Apr 13, 2017 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

At a downtown business lunch meeting April 13, Ontario’s Finance Minister Charles Sousa offered some hints of what to expect from the 2017 provincial budget when it’s released April 27.

The budget, said Sousa, will be balanced for 2017, and there won’t be new taxes on families, and will include a major “booster shot” for health care funding and more gas tax funding for transit infrastructure.

And while Sousa said he wouldn’t be offering more specific predictions prior to the budget’s release, he said that bus-riding seniors over the age of 65 would be receiving a tax refund for their transit costs.

“We’re just trying to find more affordability, measures that make life a little bit easier for seniors,” Sousa told reporters outside the Empire Club of Canada luncheon in downtown Toronto.

“Seniors in my community are looking for accommodations and city councillors have been talking about how to support seniors,” he said.

The budget is likely the second-last budget for the Liberal government before the 2018 election, and Sousa was anxious to portray it as largely a good-news budget. He noted that the economy in Ontario is proving robust, and reminded the audience at several points that the budget would be a balanced one.

And later, when asked by reporters whether there would be any new taxes on families in the budget, he was blunt.

“No,” he said. “We’re coming to a balanced budget. The people of Ontario have worked hard. We’ve taken steps to balance the budget and we want this balance to ensure that families succeed. We’re moving forward, and the principle that has guided me is, how do we improve families lives?”

Sousa also made it clear in the speech that the budget would include a boost for health care and public transit.

He said there would be “more resources through gas tax funding for communities to build transit and infrastructure, (and) because of our balanced approach there will be significantly more investments in our universal health care.”