Toronto council vote advances Scarborough subway project

News Mar 28, 2017 by Rahul Gupta Scarborough Mirror

Toronto Council voted 26-18 to advance the subway station plan for a single station east of Kennedy Station replacing the dilapidated Scarborough RT line. The vote affirms the subway plan will progress with planning and design work, along with a plan to build an expanded bus terminal at Scarborough Town Centre.

Council did not support a motion from Josh Matlow seeking a study comparing cost benefits of the subway extension with a previously approved but now cancelled plan, voting against the councillor’s motion 17-27.

Following the vote, which ended a full day of often rancorous debate, Mayor John Tory expressed relief but also lashed out at critics of the plan. The subway extension project has escalated in cost to $3.35-billion and all but exhausts the existing budget for the previously approved Scarborough network plan that now leaves an eastern extension of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT unfunded.

Rather than derail the subway plan, Tory said council critics of the plan should focus on convincing other levels of government to fund the full plan.

“I hope that maybe we can move forward from this continuous re-deciding of the question of LRT versus subway,” said Tory flanked by fellow subway supporters Tuesday evening following the debate. “If they could devote 10 per cent of the energy devoted to fighting (the subway) to help me fight for (better funding) they would be doing a far greater service to the people of Toronto.”

Matlow, who was one of several LRT-supporting councillors to face off against the mayor during the council debate vowed to keep fighting the subway project, which he termed a financial boondoggle.

He called the council vote denying his motion “reckless and irresponsible”.

“I believe we need to move forward with facts, not hearsay,” said Matlow. “If the mayor and some members of council don't even want to look at that then why do we pretend we want the facts in front of us?”

During the debate, Tory was called out by Matlow and others for citing unproven contentions the new subway station will save travel time, something he admitted he had heard from Scarborough residents.

In response Tory seemingly took a page from U.S. president Donald Trump, angrily accusing critics of the plan, of which he included some journalists, of questioning his integrity.

“I take offense at a journalist who tweeted I was basically being dishonest by simple reciting what people had told me (at a public meeting),” he said.

As per the original approval, city staff will update council on designs for the subway station, likely in spring of 2018.

Council has debated the matter 10 times now, something which should be expected given the cost of the project and the complexity of transit infrastructure, said Councillor Shelley Carroll who supports the LRT plan.

Council also supported a motion from Scarborough councillor Paul Ainslie seeking a firm timeline and funding plan for the Crosstown extension with a report due next year.

Construction on the subway station is expected to take at least six years and not likely to begin until at least 2020.

Toronto council vote advances Scarborough subway project

Put your energy into finding funding, Mayor Tory tells critics

News Mar 28, 2017 by Rahul Gupta Scarborough Mirror

Toronto Council voted 26-18 to advance the subway station plan for a single station east of Kennedy Station replacing the dilapidated Scarborough RT line. The vote affirms the subway plan will progress with planning and design work, along with a plan to build an expanded bus terminal at Scarborough Town Centre.

Council did not support a motion from Josh Matlow seeking a study comparing cost benefits of the subway extension with a previously approved but now cancelled plan, voting against the councillor’s motion 17-27.

Following the vote, which ended a full day of often rancorous debate, Mayor John Tory expressed relief but also lashed out at critics of the plan. The subway extension project has escalated in cost to $3.35-billion and all but exhausts the existing budget for the previously approved Scarborough network plan that now leaves an eastern extension of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT unfunded.

Rather than derail the subway plan, Tory said council critics of the plan should focus on convincing other levels of government to fund the full plan.

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“I hope that maybe we can move forward from this continuous re-deciding of the question of LRT versus subway,” said Tory flanked by fellow subway supporters Tuesday evening following the debate. “If they could devote 10 per cent of the energy devoted to fighting (the subway) to help me fight for (better funding) they would be doing a far greater service to the people of Toronto.”

Matlow, who was one of several LRT-supporting councillors to face off against the mayor during the council debate vowed to keep fighting the subway project, which he termed a financial boondoggle.

He called the council vote denying his motion “reckless and irresponsible”.

“I believe we need to move forward with facts, not hearsay,” said Matlow. “If the mayor and some members of council don't even want to look at that then why do we pretend we want the facts in front of us?”

During the debate, Tory was called out by Matlow and others for citing unproven contentions the new subway station will save travel time, something he admitted he had heard from Scarborough residents.

In response Tory seemingly took a page from U.S. president Donald Trump, angrily accusing critics of the plan, of which he included some journalists, of questioning his integrity.

“I take offense at a journalist who tweeted I was basically being dishonest by simple reciting what people had told me (at a public meeting),” he said.

As per the original approval, city staff will update council on designs for the subway station, likely in spring of 2018.

Council has debated the matter 10 times now, something which should be expected given the cost of the project and the complexity of transit infrastructure, said Councillor Shelley Carroll who supports the LRT plan.

Council also supported a motion from Scarborough councillor Paul Ainslie seeking a firm timeline and funding plan for the Crosstown extension with a report due next year.

Construction on the subway station is expected to take at least six years and not likely to begin until at least 2020.

Toronto council vote advances Scarborough subway project

Put your energy into finding funding, Mayor Tory tells critics

News Mar 28, 2017 by Rahul Gupta Scarborough Mirror

Toronto Council voted 26-18 to advance the subway station plan for a single station east of Kennedy Station replacing the dilapidated Scarborough RT line. The vote affirms the subway plan will progress with planning and design work, along with a plan to build an expanded bus terminal at Scarborough Town Centre.

Council did not support a motion from Josh Matlow seeking a study comparing cost benefits of the subway extension with a previously approved but now cancelled plan, voting against the councillor’s motion 17-27.

Following the vote, which ended a full day of often rancorous debate, Mayor John Tory expressed relief but also lashed out at critics of the plan. The subway extension project has escalated in cost to $3.35-billion and all but exhausts the existing budget for the previously approved Scarborough network plan that now leaves an eastern extension of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT unfunded.

Rather than derail the subway plan, Tory said council critics of the plan should focus on convincing other levels of government to fund the full plan.

Related Content

“I hope that maybe we can move forward from this continuous re-deciding of the question of LRT versus subway,” said Tory flanked by fellow subway supporters Tuesday evening following the debate. “If they could devote 10 per cent of the energy devoted to fighting (the subway) to help me fight for (better funding) they would be doing a far greater service to the people of Toronto.”

Matlow, who was one of several LRT-supporting councillors to face off against the mayor during the council debate vowed to keep fighting the subway project, which he termed a financial boondoggle.

He called the council vote denying his motion “reckless and irresponsible”.

“I believe we need to move forward with facts, not hearsay,” said Matlow. “If the mayor and some members of council don't even want to look at that then why do we pretend we want the facts in front of us?”

During the debate, Tory was called out by Matlow and others for citing unproven contentions the new subway station will save travel time, something he admitted he had heard from Scarborough residents.

In response Tory seemingly took a page from U.S. president Donald Trump, angrily accusing critics of the plan, of which he included some journalists, of questioning his integrity.

“I take offense at a journalist who tweeted I was basically being dishonest by simple reciting what people had told me (at a public meeting),” he said.

As per the original approval, city staff will update council on designs for the subway station, likely in spring of 2018.

Council has debated the matter 10 times now, something which should be expected given the cost of the project and the complexity of transit infrastructure, said Councillor Shelley Carroll who supports the LRT plan.

Council also supported a motion from Scarborough councillor Paul Ainslie seeking a firm timeline and funding plan for the Crosstown extension with a report due next year.

Construction on the subway station is expected to take at least six years and not likely to begin until at least 2020.