Toronto launcCivic Innovation Office — a platform for innovators

News Mar 10, 2017 by Hilary Caton City Centre Mirror

The City of Toronto officially launched the Civic Innovation Office, Friday, to help solve municipal service delivery challenges by creating a bridge between city divisions and Toronto’s growing innovation and technology communities.

Mayor John Tory, joined by Coun. Paul Ainslie (Ward 43 Scarborough East), chair of the government management committee; Coun. Michelle Holland (Ward 35 Scarborough Southwest), the mayor’s advocate for the innovation economy; and city manager Peter Wallace, made the announcement at the new office at Normative Inc., in Toronto.

The Civic Innovation Office will be housed within the city manager’s office and apply technology, data analysis and design thinking to develop and test solutions to challenges faced by Toronto residents.

“Toronto is home to a large population of innovators, startups and tech companies who can help the city deliver better services to the public, while promoting a new approach to problem solving within government,” said Mayor Tory in a press release.

 “I look forward to working with Bloomberg Philanthropies, city divisions and our civic technology community to launch this exciting new Civic Innovation Office.”

The office is fully funded through Bloomberg Philanthropies, a collective that works to address pressing urban challenges to improve the quality of life for local residents. Recently, Bloomberg selected Toronto as the first Canadian city to join its global network of Innovation Teams.

The office actively collaborate with other Innovation Team grantee cities, including Anchorage, Ala.; Durham, N.C.; Austin, Texas; Baltimore, Md.; Detroit, Mich.; and Be’er Sheva, Israel.

“Innovation Teams bring 21st century problem-solving skills to city hall,” said James Anderson, head of government innovation programs for Bloomberg Philanthropies, in a press release.

“The teams implement creative solutions by breaking down silos within city halls, engaging residents to jointly understand citizen needs and testing ideas before taking them to scale.”

The Civic Innovation Office will work with city divisions and agencies as required to identify major challenges to be solved through innovative partnerships with external teams, who will work through 16-week stints to deliver real solutions that can be procured by the city.

The City of Toronto has begun a search for a director, project manager and design strategist to lead the Civic Innovation Office.

More information about the postings can be found at http://www.toronto.ca/jobs.

Toronto launches Civic Innovation Office — a platform for innovators

Office will help enhance service to the public

News Mar 10, 2017 by Hilary Caton City Centre Mirror

The City of Toronto officially launched the Civic Innovation Office, Friday, to help solve municipal service delivery challenges by creating a bridge between city divisions and Toronto’s growing innovation and technology communities.

Mayor John Tory, joined by Coun. Paul Ainslie (Ward 43 Scarborough East), chair of the government management committee; Coun. Michelle Holland (Ward 35 Scarborough Southwest), the mayor’s advocate for the innovation economy; and city manager Peter Wallace, made the announcement at the new office at Normative Inc., in Toronto.

The Civic Innovation Office will be housed within the city manager’s office and apply technology, data analysis and design thinking to develop and test solutions to challenges faced by Toronto residents.

“Toronto is home to a large population of innovators, startups and tech companies who can help the city deliver better services to the public, while promoting a new approach to problem solving within government,” said Mayor Tory in a press release.

 “I look forward to working with Bloomberg Philanthropies, city divisions and our civic technology community to launch this exciting new Civic Innovation Office.”

The office is fully funded through Bloomberg Philanthropies, a collective that works to address pressing urban challenges to improve the quality of life for local residents. Recently, Bloomberg selected Toronto as the first Canadian city to join its global network of Innovation Teams.

The office actively collaborate with other Innovation Team grantee cities, including Anchorage, Ala.; Durham, N.C.; Austin, Texas; Baltimore, Md.; Detroit, Mich.; and Be’er Sheva, Israel.

“Innovation Teams bring 21st century problem-solving skills to city hall,” said James Anderson, head of government innovation programs for Bloomberg Philanthropies, in a press release.

“The teams implement creative solutions by breaking down silos within city halls, engaging residents to jointly understand citizen needs and testing ideas before taking them to scale.”

The Civic Innovation Office will work with city divisions and agencies as required to identify major challenges to be solved through innovative partnerships with external teams, who will work through 16-week stints to deliver real solutions that can be procured by the city.

The City of Toronto has begun a search for a director, project manager and design strategist to lead the Civic Innovation Office.

More information about the postings can be found at http://www.toronto.ca/jobs.

Toronto launches Civic Innovation Office — a platform for innovators

Office will help enhance service to the public

News Mar 10, 2017 by Hilary Caton City Centre Mirror

The City of Toronto officially launched the Civic Innovation Office, Friday, to help solve municipal service delivery challenges by creating a bridge between city divisions and Toronto’s growing innovation and technology communities.

Mayor John Tory, joined by Coun. Paul Ainslie (Ward 43 Scarborough East), chair of the government management committee; Coun. Michelle Holland (Ward 35 Scarborough Southwest), the mayor’s advocate for the innovation economy; and city manager Peter Wallace, made the announcement at the new office at Normative Inc., in Toronto.

The Civic Innovation Office will be housed within the city manager’s office and apply technology, data analysis and design thinking to develop and test solutions to challenges faced by Toronto residents.

“Toronto is home to a large population of innovators, startups and tech companies who can help the city deliver better services to the public, while promoting a new approach to problem solving within government,” said Mayor Tory in a press release.

 “I look forward to working with Bloomberg Philanthropies, city divisions and our civic technology community to launch this exciting new Civic Innovation Office.”

The office is fully funded through Bloomberg Philanthropies, a collective that works to address pressing urban challenges to improve the quality of life for local residents. Recently, Bloomberg selected Toronto as the first Canadian city to join its global network of Innovation Teams.

The office actively collaborate with other Innovation Team grantee cities, including Anchorage, Ala.; Durham, N.C.; Austin, Texas; Baltimore, Md.; Detroit, Mich.; and Be’er Sheva, Israel.

“Innovation Teams bring 21st century problem-solving skills to city hall,” said James Anderson, head of government innovation programs for Bloomberg Philanthropies, in a press release.

“The teams implement creative solutions by breaking down silos within city halls, engaging residents to jointly understand citizen needs and testing ideas before taking them to scale.”

The Civic Innovation Office will work with city divisions and agencies as required to identify major challenges to be solved through innovative partnerships with external teams, who will work through 16-week stints to deliver real solutions that can be procured by the city.

The City of Toronto has begun a search for a director, project manager and design strategist to lead the Civic Innovation Office.

More information about the postings can be found at http://www.toronto.ca/jobs.