Solar blanket on arena roof will help curb electricity costs

News Jan 30, 2012 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

George Bell Arena's board of management will save as much as $15,000 annually on its electricity bill once its new solar project is implemented.

The Runnymede Road and St. Clair Avenue-area rink will see the installation of a solar blanket atop its roof likely this summer, according to board member Steve Ralphs, who can take credit for presenting the idea.

"The rationale for it is that the single most expensive item to run the arena is to heat and cool the building," said Ralphs, whose sons played for years at the local recreation centre, which is celebrating 50 years in the community. "All arenas have the same issue - and that is that they have to run a balanced budget and the biggest expense is electricity."

It doesn't help that electricity costs continue to rise, added Ralphs on Friday, Jan. 20.

With support from the City of Toronto's Photovoltaic Program in conjunction with Toronto Hydro, it was suggested that solar panels or a solar blanket be installed at six additional city-run and city-owned arenas. Eight were proposed, but only six were suitable due to the condition and age of the roof, Ralphs said. These include Forest Hill Memorial, Leaside Memorial, Toronto Memorial, Ted Reeve Community Arena and William H. Bolton Arena.

So far, each arena that is participating in the project, has seen its roof evaluated to determine the capacity and condition and whether it can withstand solar panels or a solar blanket.

"The electricity that George Bell generates (with its new solar blanket) will contribute to the Ontario power grid," said Ralphs.

The capital budget for utilities at the arena in 2011 was $105,000. Ralphs anticipates an increase of 15 per cent this year. The solar project is especially good news because not only does it generate renewable energy, but also keeps the rental costs of the ice for the community as low as possible, he said.

Solar blanket on arena roof will help curb electricity costs

George Bell Arena participating in city, Toronto Hydro project

News Jan 30, 2012 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

George Bell Arena's board of management will save as much as $15,000 annually on its electricity bill once its new solar project is implemented.

The Runnymede Road and St. Clair Avenue-area rink will see the installation of a solar blanket atop its roof likely this summer, according to board member Steve Ralphs, who can take credit for presenting the idea.

"The rationale for it is that the single most expensive item to run the arena is to heat and cool the building," said Ralphs, whose sons played for years at the local recreation centre, which is celebrating 50 years in the community. "All arenas have the same issue - and that is that they have to run a balanced budget and the biggest expense is electricity."

It doesn't help that electricity costs continue to rise, added Ralphs on Friday, Jan. 20.

Related Content

With support from the City of Toronto's Photovoltaic Program in conjunction with Toronto Hydro, it was suggested that solar panels or a solar blanket be installed at six additional city-run and city-owned arenas. Eight were proposed, but only six were suitable due to the condition and age of the roof, Ralphs said. These include Forest Hill Memorial, Leaside Memorial, Toronto Memorial, Ted Reeve Community Arena and William H. Bolton Arena.

So far, each arena that is participating in the project, has seen its roof evaluated to determine the capacity and condition and whether it can withstand solar panels or a solar blanket.

"The electricity that George Bell generates (with its new solar blanket) will contribute to the Ontario power grid," said Ralphs.

The capital budget for utilities at the arena in 2011 was $105,000. Ralphs anticipates an increase of 15 per cent this year. The solar project is especially good news because not only does it generate renewable energy, but also keeps the rental costs of the ice for the community as low as possible, he said.

Solar blanket on arena roof will help curb electricity costs

George Bell Arena participating in city, Toronto Hydro project

News Jan 30, 2012 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

George Bell Arena's board of management will save as much as $15,000 annually on its electricity bill once its new solar project is implemented.

The Runnymede Road and St. Clair Avenue-area rink will see the installation of a solar blanket atop its roof likely this summer, according to board member Steve Ralphs, who can take credit for presenting the idea.

"The rationale for it is that the single most expensive item to run the arena is to heat and cool the building," said Ralphs, whose sons played for years at the local recreation centre, which is celebrating 50 years in the community. "All arenas have the same issue - and that is that they have to run a balanced budget and the biggest expense is electricity."

It doesn't help that electricity costs continue to rise, added Ralphs on Friday, Jan. 20.

Related Content

With support from the City of Toronto's Photovoltaic Program in conjunction with Toronto Hydro, it was suggested that solar panels or a solar blanket be installed at six additional city-run and city-owned arenas. Eight were proposed, but only six were suitable due to the condition and age of the roof, Ralphs said. These include Forest Hill Memorial, Leaside Memorial, Toronto Memorial, Ted Reeve Community Arena and William H. Bolton Arena.

So far, each arena that is participating in the project, has seen its roof evaluated to determine the capacity and condition and whether it can withstand solar panels or a solar blanket.

"The electricity that George Bell generates (with its new solar blanket) will contribute to the Ontario power grid," said Ralphs.

The capital budget for utilities at the arena in 2011 was $105,000. Ralphs anticipates an increase of 15 per cent this year. The solar project is especially good news because not only does it generate renewable energy, but also keeps the rental costs of the ice for the community as low as possible, he said.