East York group concerned about Woodbine/O'Connor congestion, lack of transit

News Dec 03, 2016 by Justin Skinner East York Mirror

Fed up with traffic congestion and a lack of information around a change to a bus route has a group of East York residents up in arms and demanding action from the City of Toronto and the TTC.

A group of about a dozen residents met in the parking lot of the Shoppers Drug Mart at Woodbine Avenue and O’Connor Drive on Saturday afternoon to demand schedules for the new 93 Woodbine bus route and timing changes to the stoplight at that intersection. They have started an online petition to urge both the city and the TTC to make the necessary changes.

Group spokesperson Justin Van Dette noted that he decided to take action on Nov. 11 when a senior citizen asked him if he knew when the next bus was due to arrive. One of the two 91 Woodbine buses was renamed the 93 Parkview Hills route on Oct. 9, but the TTC has yet to post schedules for the route, he said.

Van Dette noted that many TTC riders do not have smartphones that will allow them to download apps that tell them when the next bus is coming. Those riders are now left without any indication as to how long it will take for the next bus to arrive – a real concern as the days grow darker and colder.

“Why wasn’t all of this (posting of new schedules) done on October 9?” he asked. “Frankly, it’s either stupidity or incompetence.”

TTC officials could not be reached for comment Saturday.

Van Dette added that the light at Woodbine and O’Connor is responsible for long traffic snarls along O’Connor Dr. Those turning left onto Woodbine from O’Connor typically have to wait several lights to get through as the left turn signal often only lasts seven seconds outside of peak times.

“People are late for their shopping, people are late for their appointments, people are late taking their kids to sports and activities,” Van Dette said. “Getting to school on time or getting to work on time is a problem for people every day because of this intersection.”

Local resident George Sardelis said the traffic signal was a particular point of contention for him.

“It takes me 20 minutes to get across the bridge (just east of O’Connor) because there are 100 cars backed up there,” he said.

Fellow resident Konstantinos Kasekas noted it can take him 40 minutes to travel between Parkview Hills to the Don Mills ramp – a distance of just a few kilometres.

“It’s one of those things where you’re waiting to see construction or waiting to see an accident,” he said. “How can it take 40 minutes to go that short distance?”

The group also expressed concerns about bike lanes planned for Woodbine Ave. next year, though Van Dette stressed they are not demanding the lanes be nixed. They are simply worried about the impact of the lanes on already congested streets.

Those looking to sign the online petition or raise other concerns about traffic and transit in East York can do so at www.getEYmoving.ca

East York group concerned about Woodbine/O'Connor congestion, lack of transit

News Dec 03, 2016 by Justin Skinner East York Mirror

Fed up with traffic congestion and a lack of information around a change to a bus route has a group of East York residents up in arms and demanding action from the City of Toronto and the TTC.

A group of about a dozen residents met in the parking lot of the Shoppers Drug Mart at Woodbine Avenue and O’Connor Drive on Saturday afternoon to demand schedules for the new 93 Woodbine bus route and timing changes to the stoplight at that intersection. They have started an online petition to urge both the city and the TTC to make the necessary changes.

Group spokesperson Justin Van Dette noted that he decided to take action on Nov. 11 when a senior citizen asked him if he knew when the next bus was due to arrive. One of the two 91 Woodbine buses was renamed the 93 Parkview Hills route on Oct. 9, but the TTC has yet to post schedules for the route, he said.

Van Dette noted that many TTC riders do not have smartphones that will allow them to download apps that tell them when the next bus is coming. Those riders are now left without any indication as to how long it will take for the next bus to arrive – a real concern as the days grow darker and colder.

“Why wasn’t all of this (posting of new schedules) done on October 9?” he asked. “Frankly, it’s either stupidity or incompetence.”

TTC officials could not be reached for comment Saturday.

Van Dette added that the light at Woodbine and O’Connor is responsible for long traffic snarls along O’Connor Dr. Those turning left onto Woodbine from O’Connor typically have to wait several lights to get through as the left turn signal often only lasts seven seconds outside of peak times.

“People are late for their shopping, people are late for their appointments, people are late taking their kids to sports and activities,” Van Dette said. “Getting to school on time or getting to work on time is a problem for people every day because of this intersection.”

Local resident George Sardelis said the traffic signal was a particular point of contention for him.

“It takes me 20 minutes to get across the bridge (just east of O’Connor) because there are 100 cars backed up there,” he said.

Fellow resident Konstantinos Kasekas noted it can take him 40 minutes to travel between Parkview Hills to the Don Mills ramp – a distance of just a few kilometres.

“It’s one of those things where you’re waiting to see construction or waiting to see an accident,” he said. “How can it take 40 minutes to go that short distance?”

The group also expressed concerns about bike lanes planned for Woodbine Ave. next year, though Van Dette stressed they are not demanding the lanes be nixed. They are simply worried about the impact of the lanes on already congested streets.

Those looking to sign the online petition or raise other concerns about traffic and transit in East York can do so at www.getEYmoving.ca

East York group concerned about Woodbine/O'Connor congestion, lack of transit

News Dec 03, 2016 by Justin Skinner East York Mirror

Fed up with traffic congestion and a lack of information around a change to a bus route has a group of East York residents up in arms and demanding action from the City of Toronto and the TTC.

A group of about a dozen residents met in the parking lot of the Shoppers Drug Mart at Woodbine Avenue and O’Connor Drive on Saturday afternoon to demand schedules for the new 93 Woodbine bus route and timing changes to the stoplight at that intersection. They have started an online petition to urge both the city and the TTC to make the necessary changes.

Group spokesperson Justin Van Dette noted that he decided to take action on Nov. 11 when a senior citizen asked him if he knew when the next bus was due to arrive. One of the two 91 Woodbine buses was renamed the 93 Parkview Hills route on Oct. 9, but the TTC has yet to post schedules for the route, he said.

Van Dette noted that many TTC riders do not have smartphones that will allow them to download apps that tell them when the next bus is coming. Those riders are now left without any indication as to how long it will take for the next bus to arrive – a real concern as the days grow darker and colder.

“Why wasn’t all of this (posting of new schedules) done on October 9?” he asked. “Frankly, it’s either stupidity or incompetence.”

TTC officials could not be reached for comment Saturday.

Van Dette added that the light at Woodbine and O’Connor is responsible for long traffic snarls along O’Connor Dr. Those turning left onto Woodbine from O’Connor typically have to wait several lights to get through as the left turn signal often only lasts seven seconds outside of peak times.

“People are late for their shopping, people are late for their appointments, people are late taking their kids to sports and activities,” Van Dette said. “Getting to school on time or getting to work on time is a problem for people every day because of this intersection.”

Local resident George Sardelis said the traffic signal was a particular point of contention for him.

“It takes me 20 minutes to get across the bridge (just east of O’Connor) because there are 100 cars backed up there,” he said.

Fellow resident Konstantinos Kasekas noted it can take him 40 minutes to travel between Parkview Hills to the Don Mills ramp – a distance of just a few kilometres.

“It’s one of those things where you’re waiting to see construction or waiting to see an accident,” he said. “How can it take 40 minutes to go that short distance?”

The group also expressed concerns about bike lanes planned for Woodbine Ave. next year, though Van Dette stressed they are not demanding the lanes be nixed. They are simply worried about the impact of the lanes on already congested streets.

Those looking to sign the online petition or raise other concerns about traffic and transit in East York can do so at www.getEYmoving.ca