Actress brings love of theatre back to her old Scarborough school

News Nov 18, 2016 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Rochelle Bulmer was back on the worn parquet floor of the gym at Guildwood Junior Public School, where she graduated from Grade 6 in 1997.

“There was climbing equipment in here, and it felt two times bigger,” the Toronto actress said on Wednesday, Nov. 16, after performing for the school’s children with the One Little Goat Theatre Company.

For today’s kids at Guildwood Junior, Bulmer had been Antigone from Sophocles’ play of the same name, Gogo and Lucky from Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, as well as others, including a character called Mavis-the-Sometimes-Cat.

As a child, she always liked singing, music, playing around. One teacher encouraged her, made her feel she could do it. There was a choir, a band, but no outlet for acting. Bulmer sought one out.

“The focus was on sports, and I don’t think it needs to be,” she said, as girls in the gym started up a raucous basketball practice. “I want them to explore their imagination.”

Once, in the same room, actors had visited the school to perform selections from Aesop’s Fables. Bulmer doesn’t remember who they were, but they left an impression.

Acting hasn’t been easy. Bulmer freelances voices for cartoons and commercials to pay bills, and plays guitar and ukulele. “I bartended probably for 10 years just to finance my life,” she said.

Thanks to a Ontario Trillium Foundation Grant, Play, A (Mini) History of Theatre for Kids, by One Little Goat’s artistic director Adam Seelig, is touring public schools in Toronto at no cost to the school board.

At this small school on Livingston Road in southeastern Scarborough, children watching this mishmash of theatre spanning thousands of years were engaged, even the kids in kindergarten. They followed every move, Bulmer said, and there was a recognition in their faces.

They could see these forms of expression had existed for a long, long time.

“Some of these kids have never been exposed to live theatre before. I feel good bringing it to them,” Bulmer said.

One Little Goat performs Play again at West Hill Public School on Tuesday, Dec. 6.

Toronto actress brings love of theatre back to Scarborough school

Growing up, "the focus was on sports," Rochelle Bulmer says

News Nov 18, 2016 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Rochelle Bulmer was back on the worn parquet floor of the gym at Guildwood Junior Public School, where she graduated from Grade 6 in 1997.

“There was climbing equipment in here, and it felt two times bigger,” the Toronto actress said on Wednesday, Nov. 16, after performing for the school’s children with the One Little Goat Theatre Company.

For today’s kids at Guildwood Junior, Bulmer had been Antigone from Sophocles’ play of the same name, Gogo and Lucky from Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, as well as others, including a character called Mavis-the-Sometimes-Cat.

As a child, she always liked singing, music, playing around. One teacher encouraged her, made her feel she could do it. There was a choir, a band, but no outlet for acting. Bulmer sought one out.

“The focus was on sports, and I don’t think it needs to be,” she said, as girls in the gym started up a raucous basketball practice. “I want them to explore their imagination.”

Once, in the same room, actors had visited the school to perform selections from Aesop’s Fables. Bulmer doesn’t remember who they were, but they left an impression.

Acting hasn’t been easy. Bulmer freelances voices for cartoons and commercials to pay bills, and plays guitar and ukulele. “I bartended probably for 10 years just to finance my life,” she said.

Thanks to a Ontario Trillium Foundation Grant, Play, A (Mini) History of Theatre for Kids, by One Little Goat’s artistic director Adam Seelig, is touring public schools in Toronto at no cost to the school board.

At this small school on Livingston Road in southeastern Scarborough, children watching this mishmash of theatre spanning thousands of years were engaged, even the kids in kindergarten. They followed every move, Bulmer said, and there was a recognition in their faces.

They could see these forms of expression had existed for a long, long time.

“Some of these kids have never been exposed to live theatre before. I feel good bringing it to them,” Bulmer said.

One Little Goat performs Play again at West Hill Public School on Tuesday, Dec. 6.

Toronto actress brings love of theatre back to Scarborough school

Growing up, "the focus was on sports," Rochelle Bulmer says

News Nov 18, 2016 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Rochelle Bulmer was back on the worn parquet floor of the gym at Guildwood Junior Public School, where she graduated from Grade 6 in 1997.

“There was climbing equipment in here, and it felt two times bigger,” the Toronto actress said on Wednesday, Nov. 16, after performing for the school’s children with the One Little Goat Theatre Company.

For today’s kids at Guildwood Junior, Bulmer had been Antigone from Sophocles’ play of the same name, Gogo and Lucky from Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, as well as others, including a character called Mavis-the-Sometimes-Cat.

As a child, she always liked singing, music, playing around. One teacher encouraged her, made her feel she could do it. There was a choir, a band, but no outlet for acting. Bulmer sought one out.

“The focus was on sports, and I don’t think it needs to be,” she said, as girls in the gym started up a raucous basketball practice. “I want them to explore their imagination.”

Once, in the same room, actors had visited the school to perform selections from Aesop’s Fables. Bulmer doesn’t remember who they were, but they left an impression.

Acting hasn’t been easy. Bulmer freelances voices for cartoons and commercials to pay bills, and plays guitar and ukulele. “I bartended probably for 10 years just to finance my life,” she said.

Thanks to a Ontario Trillium Foundation Grant, Play, A (Mini) History of Theatre for Kids, by One Little Goat’s artistic director Adam Seelig, is touring public schools in Toronto at no cost to the school board.

At this small school on Livingston Road in southeastern Scarborough, children watching this mishmash of theatre spanning thousands of years were engaged, even the kids in kindergarten. They followed every move, Bulmer said, and there was a recognition in their faces.

They could see these forms of expression had existed for a long, long time.

“Some of these kids have never been exposed to live theatre before. I feel good bringing it to them,” Bulmer said.

One Little Goat performs Play again at West Hill Public School on Tuesday, Dec. 6.