Councillors looking to expand Danforth's reduced-speed zone

News Nov 15, 2016 by Rahul Gupta East York Mirror

Some east-end Toronto city councillors want further lowered speed limits on the Danforth.

A large western portion of the Danforth from the Don Valley to Dawes Road has already had its speed limit reduced to 40 kilometres per hour from 50 km/h, as part of the city's new road safety plan, and councillor Janet Davis has a motion before community council Tuesday, Nov. 15 that calls for extending the 40 km/h speed limit eastward to Victoria Park Avenue – a stretch of about three-quarters of a kilometre.

“The speed limit changes didn’t extend to Victoria Park, and that area should have a reduced speed limit because of the high amount of pedestrians, retail traffic and new development,” said Davis, the Beaches-East York councillor, before Tuesday’s community council meeting. “You can’t have cars travelling at 50 km/h in such a busy area.”

The area particularly around Victoria Park includes schools, seniors homes, a shopping mall and a mosque, and Davis is concerned cars are using the area as a thoroughfare to the DVP and busier parts of the Danforth, particularly during peak periods when lane restrictions are in place.

“There are some aggressive drivers squeezing in, jockeying back and forth,” said Davis. “It gets riskier when you get to places with more retail and pedestrians crossing.”

The city’s road safety plan seeks to establish designated zones with strict speed limits as part of a Vision Zero aspiration to reduce pedestrian and cycling fatalities to zero. Davis, along with fellow Beaches-East York councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon, is a proponent of speed limit reductions, pointing to traffic studies which conclude the chances of death are reduced each time the speed limit is lowered by 10 kilometres.

McMahon also has a motion before the community council to have speed limits lowered from 50 to 30 km/h on residential streets located north of Gerrard Street, between Main Street and Victoria Park. The streets should have had their speeds lowered last year as part of a community council decision, she said.

“We’re now working to change the streets which were omitted,” said McMahon. “I frankly don’t know why they were 50 km/h to begin with.”

Councillors looking to expand Danforth's reduced-speed zone

Community Council motion seeks to extend 40 km/h speed limit to Victoria Park

News Nov 15, 2016 by Rahul Gupta East York Mirror

Some east-end Toronto city councillors want further lowered speed limits on the Danforth.

A large western portion of the Danforth from the Don Valley to Dawes Road has already had its speed limit reduced to 40 kilometres per hour from 50 km/h, as part of the city's new road safety plan, and councillor Janet Davis has a motion before community council Tuesday, Nov. 15 that calls for extending the 40 km/h speed limit eastward to Victoria Park Avenue – a stretch of about three-quarters of a kilometre.

“The speed limit changes didn’t extend to Victoria Park, and that area should have a reduced speed limit because of the high amount of pedestrians, retail traffic and new development,” said Davis, the Beaches-East York councillor, before Tuesday’s community council meeting. “You can’t have cars travelling at 50 km/h in such a busy area.”

The area particularly around Victoria Park includes schools, seniors homes, a shopping mall and a mosque, and Davis is concerned cars are using the area as a thoroughfare to the DVP and busier parts of the Danforth, particularly during peak periods when lane restrictions are in place.

“There are some aggressive drivers squeezing in, jockeying back and forth,” said Davis. “It gets riskier when you get to places with more retail and pedestrians crossing.”

The city’s road safety plan seeks to establish designated zones with strict speed limits as part of a Vision Zero aspiration to reduce pedestrian and cycling fatalities to zero. Davis, along with fellow Beaches-East York councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon, is a proponent of speed limit reductions, pointing to traffic studies which conclude the chances of death are reduced each time the speed limit is lowered by 10 kilometres.

McMahon also has a motion before the community council to have speed limits lowered from 50 to 30 km/h on residential streets located north of Gerrard Street, between Main Street and Victoria Park. The streets should have had their speeds lowered last year as part of a community council decision, she said.

“We’re now working to change the streets which were omitted,” said McMahon. “I frankly don’t know why they were 50 km/h to begin with.”

Councillors looking to expand Danforth's reduced-speed zone

Community Council motion seeks to extend 40 km/h speed limit to Victoria Park

News Nov 15, 2016 by Rahul Gupta East York Mirror

Some east-end Toronto city councillors want further lowered speed limits on the Danforth.

A large western portion of the Danforth from the Don Valley to Dawes Road has already had its speed limit reduced to 40 kilometres per hour from 50 km/h, as part of the city's new road safety plan, and councillor Janet Davis has a motion before community council Tuesday, Nov. 15 that calls for extending the 40 km/h speed limit eastward to Victoria Park Avenue – a stretch of about three-quarters of a kilometre.

“The speed limit changes didn’t extend to Victoria Park, and that area should have a reduced speed limit because of the high amount of pedestrians, retail traffic and new development,” said Davis, the Beaches-East York councillor, before Tuesday’s community council meeting. “You can’t have cars travelling at 50 km/h in such a busy area.”

The area particularly around Victoria Park includes schools, seniors homes, a shopping mall and a mosque, and Davis is concerned cars are using the area as a thoroughfare to the DVP and busier parts of the Danforth, particularly during peak periods when lane restrictions are in place.

“There are some aggressive drivers squeezing in, jockeying back and forth,” said Davis. “It gets riskier when you get to places with more retail and pedestrians crossing.”

The city’s road safety plan seeks to establish designated zones with strict speed limits as part of a Vision Zero aspiration to reduce pedestrian and cycling fatalities to zero. Davis, along with fellow Beaches-East York councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon, is a proponent of speed limit reductions, pointing to traffic studies which conclude the chances of death are reduced each time the speed limit is lowered by 10 kilometres.

McMahon also has a motion before the community council to have speed limits lowered from 50 to 30 km/h on residential streets located north of Gerrard Street, between Main Street and Victoria Park. The streets should have had their speeds lowered last year as part of a community council decision, she said.

“We’re now working to change the streets which were omitted,” said McMahon. “I frankly don’t know why they were 50 km/h to begin with.”