New healing garden at St. Joseph's Health Centre provides comfort and solace to patients and visiors

News Oct 16, 2016 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

What a difference a year makes.

The property leading to the entrance of the Our Lady of Mercy Wing at St. Joseph’s Health Centre, which fronts Sunnyside Avenue in Roncesvalles Village, has received a facelift. Not just a sprucing up, but a complete overhaul featuring a healing garden that boasts new greenery and fall flowers, new benches, and a prominently placed statue of the Virgin Mary in honour of the hospital’s Catholic roots.

The garden was made possible by donour Sandra Belvedere in honour of her husband Rocco Belvedere, founder of the health and beauty care product marketing and manufacturing company Belvedere International Inc.

Belvedere was joined by her husband and family, along with president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Health Centre Elizabeth Buller and  president and CEO of the hospital’s foundation Maria Dyck, to unveil the Rocco Donald Belvedere Healing Garden during a special ceremony Sunday, Oct. 16.

“My family and I hope the garden will serve as a comfort and peace in a time of quiet reflection,” Belvedere told the audience who had gathered in the garden Sunday morning.

Belvedere, whose home is just blocks from St. Joe’s, first met Buller and Dyck at a fundraising event for the health centre in 2015. It was then that a conversation about the garden, a gift to her nature-loving husband, began.

“Everything she envisioned has come true,” Dyck said of Belvedere’s vision for the garden. “It’s a healing, tranquil space where people can feel at peace.”

As part of that vision, Belvedere worked with the hospital to host a competition for landscape architecture students. She helped select the winner, Sandra Cook, a University of Toronto student, who designed the garden. Cook was unable to attend the unveiling.

“I believe our physical space is critical to our well-being,” Buller told the about 90-member crowd.

Gardens, she said, provide comfort and solace.

Family members described Rocco Belvedere, now confined to a wheelchair and unable to speak, as a force of nature, a people person, a mentor with street smarts, an entrepreneur and a “rock solid” family man.

Following the ceremony, the family celebrated at the health centre with a brunch.

St. Joseph's Health Centre unveils healing garden

Garden funded by local donor as a tribute to her husband, who loves the outdoors

News Oct 16, 2016 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

What a difference a year makes.

The property leading to the entrance of the Our Lady of Mercy Wing at St. Joseph’s Health Centre, which fronts Sunnyside Avenue in Roncesvalles Village, has received a facelift. Not just a sprucing up, but a complete overhaul featuring a healing garden that boasts new greenery and fall flowers, new benches, and a prominently placed statue of the Virgin Mary in honour of the hospital’s Catholic roots.

The garden was made possible by donour Sandra Belvedere in honour of her husband Rocco Belvedere, founder of the health and beauty care product marketing and manufacturing company Belvedere International Inc.

Belvedere was joined by her husband and family, along with president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Health Centre Elizabeth Buller and  president and CEO of the hospital’s foundation Maria Dyck, to unveil the Rocco Donald Belvedere Healing Garden during a special ceremony Sunday, Oct. 16.

“My family and I hope the garden will serve as a comfort and peace in a time of quiet reflection,” Belvedere told the audience who had gathered in the garden Sunday morning.

Belvedere, whose home is just blocks from St. Joe’s, first met Buller and Dyck at a fundraising event for the health centre in 2015. It was then that a conversation about the garden, a gift to her nature-loving husband, began.

“Everything she envisioned has come true,” Dyck said of Belvedere’s vision for the garden. “It’s a healing, tranquil space where people can feel at peace.”

As part of that vision, Belvedere worked with the hospital to host a competition for landscape architecture students. She helped select the winner, Sandra Cook, a University of Toronto student, who designed the garden. Cook was unable to attend the unveiling.

“I believe our physical space is critical to our well-being,” Buller told the about 90-member crowd.

Gardens, she said, provide comfort and solace.

Family members described Rocco Belvedere, now confined to a wheelchair and unable to speak, as a force of nature, a people person, a mentor with street smarts, an entrepreneur and a “rock solid” family man.

Following the ceremony, the family celebrated at the health centre with a brunch.

St. Joseph's Health Centre unveils healing garden

Garden funded by local donor as a tribute to her husband, who loves the outdoors

News Oct 16, 2016 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

What a difference a year makes.

The property leading to the entrance of the Our Lady of Mercy Wing at St. Joseph’s Health Centre, which fronts Sunnyside Avenue in Roncesvalles Village, has received a facelift. Not just a sprucing up, but a complete overhaul featuring a healing garden that boasts new greenery and fall flowers, new benches, and a prominently placed statue of the Virgin Mary in honour of the hospital’s Catholic roots.

The garden was made possible by donour Sandra Belvedere in honour of her husband Rocco Belvedere, founder of the health and beauty care product marketing and manufacturing company Belvedere International Inc.

Belvedere was joined by her husband and family, along with president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Health Centre Elizabeth Buller and  president and CEO of the hospital’s foundation Maria Dyck, to unveil the Rocco Donald Belvedere Healing Garden during a special ceremony Sunday, Oct. 16.

“My family and I hope the garden will serve as a comfort and peace in a time of quiet reflection,” Belvedere told the audience who had gathered in the garden Sunday morning.

Belvedere, whose home is just blocks from St. Joe’s, first met Buller and Dyck at a fundraising event for the health centre in 2015. It was then that a conversation about the garden, a gift to her nature-loving husband, began.

“Everything she envisioned has come true,” Dyck said of Belvedere’s vision for the garden. “It’s a healing, tranquil space where people can feel at peace.”

As part of that vision, Belvedere worked with the hospital to host a competition for landscape architecture students. She helped select the winner, Sandra Cook, a University of Toronto student, who designed the garden. Cook was unable to attend the unveiling.

“I believe our physical space is critical to our well-being,” Buller told the about 90-member crowd.

Gardens, she said, provide comfort and solace.

Family members described Rocco Belvedere, now confined to a wheelchair and unable to speak, as a force of nature, a people person, a mentor with street smarts, an entrepreneur and a “rock solid” family man.

Following the ceremony, the family celebrated at the health centre with a brunch.