Teens learn about DNA at GENEius Girls workshop at John Polanyi Collegiate Institute in North York

News Oct 01, 2016 by Fannie Sunshine North York Mirror

In a small classroom inside John Polanyi Collegiate Institute, a group of teen girls used DNA to determine an ocean predatory mystery: how many sharks were responsible for a simulated attack?

Liquid DNA was loaded into a gel and placed into electrophoresis chambers. A current was then applied, and the end result was a bunch of separated bands which, based on the pattern formed, would determine how many sharks were responsible for the attack.

The teens were taking part in the GENEius Girls program, run by GENEius Science, which was founded by John Polanyi science and biology teacher Nicole Anthony, but is not affiliated with the school.

The girls spent several hours Saturday, Oct. 1 not only learning about the role DNA plays, but trying their hand at being scientists.

Anthony founded GENEius Science as a way to get more girls involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), typically male-dominated fields some females might feel intimidated by.

“I want to get them interested,” she said. “In Canada it’s three to one (male to female STEM involvement). The numbers are not great.”

Since June, GENEius Girls has offered workshops at the Allen Road and Lawrence Avenue area school and at an Oakville library, and more are planned, Anthony said.

She noted a lack of confidence, access and support at a young age contributes to the low numbers of females in the STEM fields, something she’s hoping will be a thing of the past.

“The archetype is the while male scientist,” she said. “I’m trying to change that.”

Grade 11 John Polanyi student Elizah Revilla said she enjoys learning about biology and agrees more needs to be done to get girls onboard.

“(Female) teachers like Miss Anthony will influence more girls to become involved,” she said.

Kiana Darrell said she became interested in science last year after enrolling in John Polanyi’s science, math and robotics program in Grade 9.

“It’s interesting to find out about how stuff works.”

Editor's Note: This story has been updated with with the correct spelling of GENEius Science.

Teens learn about DNA at GENEius Girls workshop at John Polanyi Collegiate Institute in North York

News Oct 01, 2016 by Fannie Sunshine North York Mirror

In a small classroom inside John Polanyi Collegiate Institute, a group of teen girls used DNA to determine an ocean predatory mystery: how many sharks were responsible for a simulated attack?

Liquid DNA was loaded into a gel and placed into electrophoresis chambers. A current was then applied, and the end result was a bunch of separated bands which, based on the pattern formed, would determine how many sharks were responsible for the attack.

The teens were taking part in the GENEius Girls program, run by GENEius Science, which was founded by John Polanyi science and biology teacher Nicole Anthony, but is not affiliated with the school.

The girls spent several hours Saturday, Oct. 1 not only learning about the role DNA plays, but trying their hand at being scientists.

Anthony founded GENEius Science as a way to get more girls involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), typically male-dominated fields some females might feel intimidated by.

“I want to get them interested,” she said. “In Canada it’s three to one (male to female STEM involvement). The numbers are not great.”

Since June, GENEius Girls has offered workshops at the Allen Road and Lawrence Avenue area school and at an Oakville library, and more are planned, Anthony said.

She noted a lack of confidence, access and support at a young age contributes to the low numbers of females in the STEM fields, something she’s hoping will be a thing of the past.

“The archetype is the while male scientist,” she said. “I’m trying to change that.”

Grade 11 John Polanyi student Elizah Revilla said she enjoys learning about biology and agrees more needs to be done to get girls onboard.

“(Female) teachers like Miss Anthony will influence more girls to become involved,” she said.

Kiana Darrell said she became interested in science last year after enrolling in John Polanyi’s science, math and robotics program in Grade 9.

“It’s interesting to find out about how stuff works.”

Editor's Note: This story has been updated with with the correct spelling of GENEius Science.

Teens learn about DNA at GENEius Girls workshop at John Polanyi Collegiate Institute in North York

News Oct 01, 2016 by Fannie Sunshine North York Mirror

In a small classroom inside John Polanyi Collegiate Institute, a group of teen girls used DNA to determine an ocean predatory mystery: how many sharks were responsible for a simulated attack?

Liquid DNA was loaded into a gel and placed into electrophoresis chambers. A current was then applied, and the end result was a bunch of separated bands which, based on the pattern formed, would determine how many sharks were responsible for the attack.

The teens were taking part in the GENEius Girls program, run by GENEius Science, which was founded by John Polanyi science and biology teacher Nicole Anthony, but is not affiliated with the school.

The girls spent several hours Saturday, Oct. 1 not only learning about the role DNA plays, but trying their hand at being scientists.

Anthony founded GENEius Science as a way to get more girls involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), typically male-dominated fields some females might feel intimidated by.

“I want to get them interested,” she said. “In Canada it’s three to one (male to female STEM involvement). The numbers are not great.”

Since June, GENEius Girls has offered workshops at the Allen Road and Lawrence Avenue area school and at an Oakville library, and more are planned, Anthony said.

She noted a lack of confidence, access and support at a young age contributes to the low numbers of females in the STEM fields, something she’s hoping will be a thing of the past.

“The archetype is the while male scientist,” she said. “I’m trying to change that.”

Grade 11 John Polanyi student Elizah Revilla said she enjoys learning about biology and agrees more needs to be done to get girls onboard.

“(Female) teachers like Miss Anthony will influence more girls to become involved,” she said.

Kiana Darrell said she became interested in science last year after enrolling in John Polanyi’s science, math and robotics program in Grade 9.

“It’s interesting to find out about how stuff works.”

Editor's Note: This story has been updated with with the correct spelling of GENEius Science.