Hudak, Ford meet privately at annual barbecue

News Sep 06, 2011 by Noel Grzetic Etobicoke Guardian

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak didn't leave with an endorsement from Mayor Rob Ford after a private meeting between the two last Friday night, but at least there were beers and burgers.

The two discussed child care, public health, Toronto Community Housing and, of course, the Sheppard subway line extension, Ford's "number one issue," just before the Ford Fest barbecue at his mother's house.

"I think the way the mayor has described this to me, he's not asking for new money. He's simply asking for money that's been allocated be repositioned," said Hudak of the subway line. "I'll look forward to innovative solutions and how we can help him do just that."

Ford heavily campaigned on the extension, promising significant funding from the private sector. Last month he acknowledged there may be a gap he needs the provincial government to fill.

The current deal is to direct up to $650 million to the Sheppard line depending on how much under budget the Eglinton-Scarborough Crosstown LRT line arrives at - a number that won't be available until all the costs have been finalized.

Ford wants the money advanced.

The two met to cap off a series of meetings Ford held with Ontario's three major political party leaders to determine who he thinks is the best option for Toronto. He asked them all the "exact same questions."

Last month Ford met with Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty at Queen's Park and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horvath at City Hall. McGuinty stuck with the current deal whereas Horwath said they can have that conversation when the funding gap is calculated and if she becomes premier.

In the final days of last spring's federal election campaign, Ford sent automated phone messages to four key ridings, three of which turned Conservative blue. The mayor said if he publicly backs someone it would probably be three days before Ontarians go to the polls.

Earlier this year, he threatened to use "Ford Nation", a name coined for his supporters, against the McGuinty government if he didn't get the funding he wants for the city.

Hudak made multiple digs at the David Miller era of city politics, calling it a "mess." Later in the evening, Ford promised a maximum 2.5 per cent property tax increase if it needs to come to that.

The only provincial party leader with any chance of gaining seats Ford hasn't met with yet is the Ontario Green Party's Mike Schreiner. Representatives from both politicians' offices said neither has been contacted but would welcome a meeting.

Ontarians head to the polls Thursday, Oct. 6.

Hudak, Ford meet privately at annual barbecue

Meeting caps off series of talks with provincial political leaders

News Sep 06, 2011 by Noel Grzetic Etobicoke Guardian

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak didn't leave with an endorsement from Mayor Rob Ford after a private meeting between the two last Friday night, but at least there were beers and burgers.

The two discussed child care, public health, Toronto Community Housing and, of course, the Sheppard subway line extension, Ford's "number one issue," just before the Ford Fest barbecue at his mother's house.

"I think the way the mayor has described this to me, he's not asking for new money. He's simply asking for money that's been allocated be repositioned," said Hudak of the subway line. "I'll look forward to innovative solutions and how we can help him do just that."

Ford heavily campaigned on the extension, promising significant funding from the private sector. Last month he acknowledged there may be a gap he needs the provincial government to fill.

Related Content

The current deal is to direct up to $650 million to the Sheppard line depending on how much under budget the Eglinton-Scarborough Crosstown LRT line arrives at - a number that won't be available until all the costs have been finalized.

Ford wants the money advanced.

The two met to cap off a series of meetings Ford held with Ontario's three major political party leaders to determine who he thinks is the best option for Toronto. He asked them all the "exact same questions."

Last month Ford met with Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty at Queen's Park and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horvath at City Hall. McGuinty stuck with the current deal whereas Horwath said they can have that conversation when the funding gap is calculated and if she becomes premier.

In the final days of last spring's federal election campaign, Ford sent automated phone messages to four key ridings, three of which turned Conservative blue. The mayor said if he publicly backs someone it would probably be three days before Ontarians go to the polls.

Earlier this year, he threatened to use "Ford Nation", a name coined for his supporters, against the McGuinty government if he didn't get the funding he wants for the city.

Hudak made multiple digs at the David Miller era of city politics, calling it a "mess." Later in the evening, Ford promised a maximum 2.5 per cent property tax increase if it needs to come to that.

The only provincial party leader with any chance of gaining seats Ford hasn't met with yet is the Ontario Green Party's Mike Schreiner. Representatives from both politicians' offices said neither has been contacted but would welcome a meeting.

Ontarians head to the polls Thursday, Oct. 6.

Hudak, Ford meet privately at annual barbecue

Meeting caps off series of talks with provincial political leaders

News Sep 06, 2011 by Noel Grzetic Etobicoke Guardian

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak didn't leave with an endorsement from Mayor Rob Ford after a private meeting between the two last Friday night, but at least there were beers and burgers.

The two discussed child care, public health, Toronto Community Housing and, of course, the Sheppard subway line extension, Ford's "number one issue," just before the Ford Fest barbecue at his mother's house.

"I think the way the mayor has described this to me, he's not asking for new money. He's simply asking for money that's been allocated be repositioned," said Hudak of the subway line. "I'll look forward to innovative solutions and how we can help him do just that."

Ford heavily campaigned on the extension, promising significant funding from the private sector. Last month he acknowledged there may be a gap he needs the provincial government to fill.

Related Content

The current deal is to direct up to $650 million to the Sheppard line depending on how much under budget the Eglinton-Scarborough Crosstown LRT line arrives at - a number that won't be available until all the costs have been finalized.

Ford wants the money advanced.

The two met to cap off a series of meetings Ford held with Ontario's three major political party leaders to determine who he thinks is the best option for Toronto. He asked them all the "exact same questions."

Last month Ford met with Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty at Queen's Park and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horvath at City Hall. McGuinty stuck with the current deal whereas Horwath said they can have that conversation when the funding gap is calculated and if she becomes premier.

In the final days of last spring's federal election campaign, Ford sent automated phone messages to four key ridings, three of which turned Conservative blue. The mayor said if he publicly backs someone it would probably be three days before Ontarians go to the polls.

Earlier this year, he threatened to use "Ford Nation", a name coined for his supporters, against the McGuinty government if he didn't get the funding he wants for the city.

Hudak made multiple digs at the David Miller era of city politics, calling it a "mess." Later in the evening, Ford promised a maximum 2.5 per cent property tax increase if it needs to come to that.

The only provincial party leader with any chance of gaining seats Ford hasn't met with yet is the Ontario Green Party's Mike Schreiner. Representatives from both politicians' offices said neither has been contacted but would welcome a meeting.

Ontarians head to the polls Thursday, Oct. 6.