UTSC development plans linked to transit line will change east Scarborough

News Apr 22, 2016 Scarborough Mirror

The University of Toronto Scarborough is putting its Master Plan into action, which means it needs city approval.

The university is sitting on a big block of undeveloped and underdeveloped land in northeast Scarborough.

During the next few weeks, it will submit a plan to the City of Toronto for building its campus, the UTSC Secondary Plan, around a proposed light-rail line and a section of Military Trail, north of Ellesmere Road, turned into a pedestrian walkway.

“The future of the campus lies to the north, where the parking lots and the intersection of Military Trail and Ellesmere will be transformed through new growth and development,” the Master Plan says.

The Secondary Plan would take UTSC’s plan and make it city policy.

Whether or not the LRT line, an extension of the Eglinton Crosstown running east and north from Kennedy Station, is ever built, growth won’t stop on the campus.

UTSC recently opened the Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre and a new Environmental Sciences building. It’s now said to be planning a hotel-conference centre, a student residence, a social sciences centre, and other projects.

The Secondary Plan, like the Master Plan before it, would transform Military Trail, an entry road from Morningside Avenue with “a landscaped pedestrian spine and a campus focal point” starting from the Campus Core, a pedestrian plaza at what is now Military Trail and Ellesmere.

The pedestrian spine is seen as a future high-density area, home to retail, restaurant, office, residential and academic uses.

Part of it would open on a North Campus common, a large open space. There would also be a Science Common and a South Campus Common, as well as easier connections to the ravine lands and Miller Lash House on U of T property further south.

The tallest buildings would be along the transit line, which in its master-planned proposal ran east along Ellesmere from Morningside, and then north along the re-aligned Military Trail back to Morningside.

Reports on several transit projects will reach Mayor John Tory’s executive committee in June, but it’s clear UTSC, which receives 700 TTC buses a day, will support a fast construction of the Crosstown East.

The Master Plan also included a block of city and provincial lands south of Hwy. 401, suggesting some of those “strategically important” lands should find new use in the future as industrial, residential, or natural areas to complement campus development.

The university also says the larger north campus has “the potential to accommodate a variety of partnership uses,” including “industry-university partnerships”.

At an open house last week, Brent Duguid, UTSC’s director of partnerships, said the campus is including other neighbourhoods and groups such as the Scarborough Business Association in secondary plan consultations, because the plan will have such profound effects on Scarborough.

The city will hold its own consultations and public meetings on the Secondary Plan. Final approval is expected in the early months of 2017.

You can see more at www.utsc.utoronto.ca/aboutus/secondary-plan-consultations

UTSC development plans linked to transit line will change east Scarborough

Hotel-conference centre, changes to roads will impact area around campus, Pan Am centre

News Apr 22, 2016 Scarborough Mirror

The University of Toronto Scarborough is putting its Master Plan into action, which means it needs city approval.

The university is sitting on a big block of undeveloped and underdeveloped land in northeast Scarborough.

During the next few weeks, it will submit a plan to the City of Toronto for building its campus, the UTSC Secondary Plan, around a proposed light-rail line and a section of Military Trail, north of Ellesmere Road, turned into a pedestrian walkway.

“The future of the campus lies to the north, where the parking lots and the intersection of Military Trail and Ellesmere will be transformed through new growth and development,” the Master Plan says.

The Secondary Plan would take UTSC’s plan and make it city policy.

Whether or not the LRT line, an extension of the Eglinton Crosstown running east and north from Kennedy Station, is ever built, growth won’t stop on the campus.

UTSC recently opened the Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre and a new Environmental Sciences building. It’s now said to be planning a hotel-conference centre, a student residence, a social sciences centre, and other projects.

The Secondary Plan, like the Master Plan before it, would transform Military Trail, an entry road from Morningside Avenue with “a landscaped pedestrian spine and a campus focal point” starting from the Campus Core, a pedestrian plaza at what is now Military Trail and Ellesmere.

The pedestrian spine is seen as a future high-density area, home to retail, restaurant, office, residential and academic uses.

Part of it would open on a North Campus common, a large open space. There would also be a Science Common and a South Campus Common, as well as easier connections to the ravine lands and Miller Lash House on U of T property further south.

The tallest buildings would be along the transit line, which in its master-planned proposal ran east along Ellesmere from Morningside, and then north along the re-aligned Military Trail back to Morningside.

Reports on several transit projects will reach Mayor John Tory’s executive committee in June, but it’s clear UTSC, which receives 700 TTC buses a day, will support a fast construction of the Crosstown East.

The Master Plan also included a block of city and provincial lands south of Hwy. 401, suggesting some of those “strategically important” lands should find new use in the future as industrial, residential, or natural areas to complement campus development.

The university also says the larger north campus has “the potential to accommodate a variety of partnership uses,” including “industry-university partnerships”.

At an open house last week, Brent Duguid, UTSC’s director of partnerships, said the campus is including other neighbourhoods and groups such as the Scarborough Business Association in secondary plan consultations, because the plan will have such profound effects on Scarborough.

The city will hold its own consultations and public meetings on the Secondary Plan. Final approval is expected in the early months of 2017.

You can see more at www.utsc.utoronto.ca/aboutus/secondary-plan-consultations

UTSC development plans linked to transit line will change east Scarborough

Hotel-conference centre, changes to roads will impact area around campus, Pan Am centre

News Apr 22, 2016 Scarborough Mirror

The University of Toronto Scarborough is putting its Master Plan into action, which means it needs city approval.

The university is sitting on a big block of undeveloped and underdeveloped land in northeast Scarborough.

During the next few weeks, it will submit a plan to the City of Toronto for building its campus, the UTSC Secondary Plan, around a proposed light-rail line and a section of Military Trail, north of Ellesmere Road, turned into a pedestrian walkway.

“The future of the campus lies to the north, where the parking lots and the intersection of Military Trail and Ellesmere will be transformed through new growth and development,” the Master Plan says.

The Secondary Plan would take UTSC’s plan and make it city policy.

Whether or not the LRT line, an extension of the Eglinton Crosstown running east and north from Kennedy Station, is ever built, growth won’t stop on the campus.

UTSC recently opened the Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre and a new Environmental Sciences building. It’s now said to be planning a hotel-conference centre, a student residence, a social sciences centre, and other projects.

The Secondary Plan, like the Master Plan before it, would transform Military Trail, an entry road from Morningside Avenue with “a landscaped pedestrian spine and a campus focal point” starting from the Campus Core, a pedestrian plaza at what is now Military Trail and Ellesmere.

The pedestrian spine is seen as a future high-density area, home to retail, restaurant, office, residential and academic uses.

Part of it would open on a North Campus common, a large open space. There would also be a Science Common and a South Campus Common, as well as easier connections to the ravine lands and Miller Lash House on U of T property further south.

The tallest buildings would be along the transit line, which in its master-planned proposal ran east along Ellesmere from Morningside, and then north along the re-aligned Military Trail back to Morningside.

Reports on several transit projects will reach Mayor John Tory’s executive committee in June, but it’s clear UTSC, which receives 700 TTC buses a day, will support a fast construction of the Crosstown East.

The Master Plan also included a block of city and provincial lands south of Hwy. 401, suggesting some of those “strategically important” lands should find new use in the future as industrial, residential, or natural areas to complement campus development.

The university also says the larger north campus has “the potential to accommodate a variety of partnership uses,” including “industry-university partnerships”.

At an open house last week, Brent Duguid, UTSC’s director of partnerships, said the campus is including other neighbourhoods and groups such as the Scarborough Business Association in secondary plan consultations, because the plan will have such profound effects on Scarborough.

The city will hold its own consultations and public meetings on the Secondary Plan. Final approval is expected in the early months of 2017.

You can see more at www.utsc.utoronto.ca/aboutus/secondary-plan-consultations