Motivational speaker Farley Flex tells Ebony Toastmasters members to distinguish themselves

News Apr 19, 2016 by Lisa Rainford York Guardian

Elaine Robinson, a native of the Caribbean, says she has always been more than comfortable speaking in front her family, friends, and peers, and doesn’t hesitate to wisecrack knowing they share her sense of humour.

She is no stranger to making presentations in her career having worked in community service for the past three decades, yet Robinson says she is apprehensive when it comes to injecting funny anecdotes into her speeches.

“Will they get the joke if they aren’t from the Caribbean?” Robinson told The Guardian.

That’s one of the reasons why she joined Toastmasters, billed as ‘a world leader in helping people to develop their public speaking and leadership skills.’

“It’s helped me in my professional career. I don’t have a problem speaking to people, but it’s the structure. At Toastmasters, you learn about timing. You learn how to develop context that would grab an audience,” Robinson said.

Robinson, who is in her second year with Toastmasters and has competed and won several competitions at the district level, attended the Ebony Toastmasters meeting Monday, April 18 to hear motivational speaker, talent executive and former Canadian Idol judge Farley Flex talk about building a professional speaking career. Ebony Toastmasters meets at St. Matthew’s Bracondale House on St. Clair Avenue West at Christie Street is a chapter of Toastmasters International, which has been serving a diverse community, helping its members gain self-confidence, for more than a decade.

As she socialized before the presentation, Carmelita Dela Cruz said she used to read in front of her congregation at church, but the priest told her she read too quickly. That’s when a friend suggested she try Toastmasters. Now, her priest wants her to facilitate a workshop for parishioners on how to connect with audiences.

“It’s one of the best organizations because it teaches you how to be an effective communicator. The environment is really encouraging,” said Dela Cruz, who works for Royal Bank. “It’s the best platform to practice – at work, you can’t screw up your presentation.”

Assata McKenzie has been a member of Ebony Toastmasters for the past two-and-a-half years after belonging to a different club previously.

“Here, we have the professionalism, support and camaraderie,” she said. “I have the gift of the gab, but I need structure.”

A capacity crowd gathered to listen to Flex, an internationally recognized professional speaker talk about such topics as ‘how to monetize speeches,’ personal growth, and entrepreneurship. It seemed Flex was destined to become a professional speaker having grown up in a family of “orators.” He and his three siblings were encouraged to express, to be confident and go out and see the world. Every Sunday after church, he and his siblings had to make a presentation to the family. It was “standard protocol,” Flex said.

“There was no food until you stepped up to the plate,” he said.

Speaking of his career and what motivates him, Flex said, “Love, for me, defines my thought process – what do I love about myself, about others? What do I love to do? You have to have definition of self,” Flex told his audience.

Business is as simple as two children sitting in a sandbox; one has a shovel and the other a bucket.

“You have to have something to offer. You’ve got to distinguish yourself from the marketplace, you’ve got to have unique selling properties,” Flex said. “What makes you different? What do you have to offer others?”

Passion is also key to success, he said.

“Don’t ever ration your passion.”

For more information, visit www.ebonytoastmasters.org

Motivational speaker Farley Flex tells Ebony Toastmasters members to distinguish themselves

Former Canadian Idol judge provides advice for becoming a public speaker

News Apr 19, 2016 by Lisa Rainford York Guardian

Elaine Robinson, a native of the Caribbean, says she has always been more than comfortable speaking in front her family, friends, and peers, and doesn’t hesitate to wisecrack knowing they share her sense of humour.

She is no stranger to making presentations in her career having worked in community service for the past three decades, yet Robinson says she is apprehensive when it comes to injecting funny anecdotes into her speeches.

“Will they get the joke if they aren’t from the Caribbean?” Robinson told The Guardian.

That’s one of the reasons why she joined Toastmasters, billed as ‘a world leader in helping people to develop their public speaking and leadership skills.’

“It’s helped me in my professional career. I don’t have a problem speaking to people, but it’s the structure. At Toastmasters, you learn about timing. You learn how to develop context that would grab an audience,” Robinson said.

Robinson, who is in her second year with Toastmasters and has competed and won several competitions at the district level, attended the Ebony Toastmasters meeting Monday, April 18 to hear motivational speaker, talent executive and former Canadian Idol judge Farley Flex talk about building a professional speaking career. Ebony Toastmasters meets at St. Matthew’s Bracondale House on St. Clair Avenue West at Christie Street is a chapter of Toastmasters International, which has been serving a diverse community, helping its members gain self-confidence, for more than a decade.

As she socialized before the presentation, Carmelita Dela Cruz said she used to read in front of her congregation at church, but the priest told her she read too quickly. That’s when a friend suggested she try Toastmasters. Now, her priest wants her to facilitate a workshop for parishioners on how to connect with audiences.

“It’s one of the best organizations because it teaches you how to be an effective communicator. The environment is really encouraging,” said Dela Cruz, who works for Royal Bank. “It’s the best platform to practice – at work, you can’t screw up your presentation.”

Assata McKenzie has been a member of Ebony Toastmasters for the past two-and-a-half years after belonging to a different club previously.

“Here, we have the professionalism, support and camaraderie,” she said. “I have the gift of the gab, but I need structure.”

A capacity crowd gathered to listen to Flex, an internationally recognized professional speaker talk about such topics as ‘how to monetize speeches,’ personal growth, and entrepreneurship. It seemed Flex was destined to become a professional speaker having grown up in a family of “orators.” He and his three siblings were encouraged to express, to be confident and go out and see the world. Every Sunday after church, he and his siblings had to make a presentation to the family. It was “standard protocol,” Flex said.

“There was no food until you stepped up to the plate,” he said.

Speaking of his career and what motivates him, Flex said, “Love, for me, defines my thought process – what do I love about myself, about others? What do I love to do? You have to have definition of self,” Flex told his audience.

Business is as simple as two children sitting in a sandbox; one has a shovel and the other a bucket.

“You have to have something to offer. You’ve got to distinguish yourself from the marketplace, you’ve got to have unique selling properties,” Flex said. “What makes you different? What do you have to offer others?”

Passion is also key to success, he said.

“Don’t ever ration your passion.”

For more information, visit www.ebonytoastmasters.org

Motivational speaker Farley Flex tells Ebony Toastmasters members to distinguish themselves

Former Canadian Idol judge provides advice for becoming a public speaker

News Apr 19, 2016 by Lisa Rainford York Guardian

Elaine Robinson, a native of the Caribbean, says she has always been more than comfortable speaking in front her family, friends, and peers, and doesn’t hesitate to wisecrack knowing they share her sense of humour.

She is no stranger to making presentations in her career having worked in community service for the past three decades, yet Robinson says she is apprehensive when it comes to injecting funny anecdotes into her speeches.

“Will they get the joke if they aren’t from the Caribbean?” Robinson told The Guardian.

That’s one of the reasons why she joined Toastmasters, billed as ‘a world leader in helping people to develop their public speaking and leadership skills.’

“It’s helped me in my professional career. I don’t have a problem speaking to people, but it’s the structure. At Toastmasters, you learn about timing. You learn how to develop context that would grab an audience,” Robinson said.

Robinson, who is in her second year with Toastmasters and has competed and won several competitions at the district level, attended the Ebony Toastmasters meeting Monday, April 18 to hear motivational speaker, talent executive and former Canadian Idol judge Farley Flex talk about building a professional speaking career. Ebony Toastmasters meets at St. Matthew’s Bracondale House on St. Clair Avenue West at Christie Street is a chapter of Toastmasters International, which has been serving a diverse community, helping its members gain self-confidence, for more than a decade.

As she socialized before the presentation, Carmelita Dela Cruz said she used to read in front of her congregation at church, but the priest told her she read too quickly. That’s when a friend suggested she try Toastmasters. Now, her priest wants her to facilitate a workshop for parishioners on how to connect with audiences.

“It’s one of the best organizations because it teaches you how to be an effective communicator. The environment is really encouraging,” said Dela Cruz, who works for Royal Bank. “It’s the best platform to practice – at work, you can’t screw up your presentation.”

Assata McKenzie has been a member of Ebony Toastmasters for the past two-and-a-half years after belonging to a different club previously.

“Here, we have the professionalism, support and camaraderie,” she said. “I have the gift of the gab, but I need structure.”

A capacity crowd gathered to listen to Flex, an internationally recognized professional speaker talk about such topics as ‘how to monetize speeches,’ personal growth, and entrepreneurship. It seemed Flex was destined to become a professional speaker having grown up in a family of “orators.” He and his three siblings were encouraged to express, to be confident and go out and see the world. Every Sunday after church, he and his siblings had to make a presentation to the family. It was “standard protocol,” Flex said.

“There was no food until you stepped up to the plate,” he said.

Speaking of his career and what motivates him, Flex said, “Love, for me, defines my thought process – what do I love about myself, about others? What do I love to do? You have to have definition of self,” Flex told his audience.

Business is as simple as two children sitting in a sandbox; one has a shovel and the other a bucket.

“You have to have something to offer. You’ve got to distinguish yourself from the marketplace, you’ve got to have unique selling properties,” Flex said. “What makes you different? What do you have to offer others?”

Passion is also key to success, he said.

“Don’t ever ration your passion.”

For more information, visit www.ebonytoastmasters.org