MPP Tabuns introduces private members bill to increase amount of leave for grieving parents

News Mar 09, 2016 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

Toronto-Danforth MPP Peter Tabuns introduced a private member’s bill in the Ontario Legislature earlier this week aimed at giving grieving parents more than 10 days of unpaid leave.

“Ten days is not enough. We need to give parents time to grieve and figure things out,” he said late Tuesday afternoon.

“(Losing a child) is the kind of nightmare parents never want to go through.”

In Bill 175, also knowns as Jonathan’s Law, Tabuns calls on the province to amend the Ontario Employment Standards Act to allow parents who have lost a child under 18 as a result of illness or accident to take 52 weeks of unpaid leave and have guaranteed job protection.

Currently, parents are entitled to a 37 weeks of leave to care for a critically ill child or if a child died as a result of a crime.

Bill 175 is named in honour of 16-year-old Jonathan Leitao, who died of cancer in 2014. It came about after Toronto-Danforth residents Meighan Ferris-Miles and Jonathan Miles, who lost their three-and-a-half-year-old son Noah to group A streptococcal disease on Jan. 17, 2015, connected with Vince and Espy Leitao, who had also lost their son.

Together, they approached Tabuns about creating a private member’s bill that would extend bereavement leave for parents.

“After our son Noah died, Jonathan and I were fortunate to work for compassionate employers who provided us with the time we needed to start to adjust to our new normal. Our employers have also been extremely flexible in allowing us to gradually return to the workplace and take time off to attend counselling or manage grief outbursts triggered by important dates such as Noah’s birthday or anniversary of his death,” Ferris-Miles said in an email to The Mirror.

“Not everyone is so fortunate to have great employers, This law, when passed, will ensure that all bereaved parents are provided job protection for up to 52 weeks while they work through their grief.”

A date for a second reading of Jonathan’s Law has yet to be determined. Tabuns said he hopes it will happen by the fall.

MPP Tabuns introduces private members bill to increase amount of leave for grieving parents

Bill 175, Jonathan’s Law, seeks 52 weeks of unpaid leave

News Mar 09, 2016 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

Toronto-Danforth MPP Peter Tabuns introduced a private member’s bill in the Ontario Legislature earlier this week aimed at giving grieving parents more than 10 days of unpaid leave.

“Ten days is not enough. We need to give parents time to grieve and figure things out,” he said late Tuesday afternoon.

“(Losing a child) is the kind of nightmare parents never want to go through.”

In Bill 175, also knowns as Jonathan’s Law, Tabuns calls on the province to amend the Ontario Employment Standards Act to allow parents who have lost a child under 18 as a result of illness or accident to take 52 weeks of unpaid leave and have guaranteed job protection.

Currently, parents are entitled to a 37 weeks of leave to care for a critically ill child or if a child died as a result of a crime.

Bill 175 is named in honour of 16-year-old Jonathan Leitao, who died of cancer in 2014. It came about after Toronto-Danforth residents Meighan Ferris-Miles and Jonathan Miles, who lost their three-and-a-half-year-old son Noah to group A streptococcal disease on Jan. 17, 2015, connected with Vince and Espy Leitao, who had also lost their son.

Together, they approached Tabuns about creating a private member’s bill that would extend bereavement leave for parents.

“After our son Noah died, Jonathan and I were fortunate to work for compassionate employers who provided us with the time we needed to start to adjust to our new normal. Our employers have also been extremely flexible in allowing us to gradually return to the workplace and take time off to attend counselling or manage grief outbursts triggered by important dates such as Noah’s birthday or anniversary of his death,” Ferris-Miles said in an email to The Mirror.

“Not everyone is so fortunate to have great employers, This law, when passed, will ensure that all bereaved parents are provided job protection for up to 52 weeks while they work through their grief.”

A date for a second reading of Jonathan’s Law has yet to be determined. Tabuns said he hopes it will happen by the fall.

MPP Tabuns introduces private members bill to increase amount of leave for grieving parents

Bill 175, Jonathan’s Law, seeks 52 weeks of unpaid leave

News Mar 09, 2016 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

Toronto-Danforth MPP Peter Tabuns introduced a private member’s bill in the Ontario Legislature earlier this week aimed at giving grieving parents more than 10 days of unpaid leave.

“Ten days is not enough. We need to give parents time to grieve and figure things out,” he said late Tuesday afternoon.

“(Losing a child) is the kind of nightmare parents never want to go through.”

In Bill 175, also knowns as Jonathan’s Law, Tabuns calls on the province to amend the Ontario Employment Standards Act to allow parents who have lost a child under 18 as a result of illness or accident to take 52 weeks of unpaid leave and have guaranteed job protection.

Currently, parents are entitled to a 37 weeks of leave to care for a critically ill child or if a child died as a result of a crime.

Bill 175 is named in honour of 16-year-old Jonathan Leitao, who died of cancer in 2014. It came about after Toronto-Danforth residents Meighan Ferris-Miles and Jonathan Miles, who lost their three-and-a-half-year-old son Noah to group A streptococcal disease on Jan. 17, 2015, connected with Vince and Espy Leitao, who had also lost their son.

Together, they approached Tabuns about creating a private member’s bill that would extend bereavement leave for parents.

“After our son Noah died, Jonathan and I were fortunate to work for compassionate employers who provided us with the time we needed to start to adjust to our new normal. Our employers have also been extremely flexible in allowing us to gradually return to the workplace and take time off to attend counselling or manage grief outbursts triggered by important dates such as Noah’s birthday or anniversary of his death,” Ferris-Miles said in an email to The Mirror.

“Not everyone is so fortunate to have great employers, This law, when passed, will ensure that all bereaved parents are provided job protection for up to 52 weeks while they work through their grief.”

A date for a second reading of Jonathan’s Law has yet to be determined. Tabuns said he hopes it will happen by the fall.