Open house in Scarborough for light-rail line

News Feb 25, 2016 Scarborough Mirror

There’s a light-rail line promised again to people in East Scarborough, and residents at an open house this Saturday, Feb. 27, can ask about it.

But so far, the City of Toronto hasn’t revealed some basic facts about the Crosstown East, such as when it may be built.

And that’s why Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie says he won’t hold a public meeting of his own on the project “until I have more meat on the bones.”

Announced by Mayor John Tory last month along with news the Scarborough Subway extension was being “optimized” down to one stop, the Crosstown East is similar to the proposed Scarborough-Malvern LRT line shelved by the province in 2009.

Crosstown East is shorter and has fewer stops, but would take basically the same route from Kennedy Station down the centre of Eglinton Avenue, Kingston Road and Morningside Avenue to the University of Toronto Scarborough campus (UTSC).

Ainslie has heard its design is different than the 2009 proposal - “I’m supposed to get two full lanes of traffic and a bike lane” for each side of Kingston, he said - but city transportation planners have yet to set a construction date, or release projected ridership numbers.

In an interview this week, Ainslie said he still has the same concerns he had about the earlier LRT proposal, which the province put off building until 2023.

Will areas along Kingston become isolated by a lack of left turns, he asked, and if people from east of the city are encouraged to use the LRT, where will they park?

City and Metrolinx staff say they’ve prepared to discuss the Crosstown East, the subway extension and other transit projects across Toronto Saturday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Scarborough Civic Centre.

So far, the city says building the Crosstown East will let people ride from UTSC to Pearson International Airport and the East Scarborough route will serve five Neighbourhood Improvement Areas.

The city has studied Kingston Road as an “avenue” to ease redevelopment, but Ainslie said success from this has been limited.

“I don’t want more townhouses,” he said.

Choices For Scarborough, a report released last year by Andre Sorensen and Paul Hess for the Cities Lab at UTSC suggested an LRT line along the old Scarborough-Malvern route (12-kilometres long, running north to Sheppard Avenue) could spark development on 208 hectares, or 514 acres, including at Highway 401 and Morningside, where U of T owns the largest block of vacant land in Scarborough.

The shorter, eight-kilometre Crosstown East route ends at UTSC.

- Mike Adler

Open house in Scarborough for light-rail line

News Feb 25, 2016 Scarborough Mirror

There’s a light-rail line promised again to people in East Scarborough, and residents at an open house this Saturday, Feb. 27, can ask about it.

But so far, the City of Toronto hasn’t revealed some basic facts about the Crosstown East, such as when it may be built.

And that’s why Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie says he won’t hold a public meeting of his own on the project “until I have more meat on the bones.”

Announced by Mayor John Tory last month along with news the Scarborough Subway extension was being “optimized” down to one stop, the Crosstown East is similar to the proposed Scarborough-Malvern LRT line shelved by the province in 2009.

Crosstown East is shorter and has fewer stops, but would take basically the same route from Kennedy Station down the centre of Eglinton Avenue, Kingston Road and Morningside Avenue to the University of Toronto Scarborough campus (UTSC).

Ainslie has heard its design is different than the 2009 proposal - “I’m supposed to get two full lanes of traffic and a bike lane” for each side of Kingston, he said - but city transportation planners have yet to set a construction date, or release projected ridership numbers.

In an interview this week, Ainslie said he still has the same concerns he had about the earlier LRT proposal, which the province put off building until 2023.

Will areas along Kingston become isolated by a lack of left turns, he asked, and if people from east of the city are encouraged to use the LRT, where will they park?

City and Metrolinx staff say they’ve prepared to discuss the Crosstown East, the subway extension and other transit projects across Toronto Saturday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Scarborough Civic Centre.

So far, the city says building the Crosstown East will let people ride from UTSC to Pearson International Airport and the East Scarborough route will serve five Neighbourhood Improvement Areas.

The city has studied Kingston Road as an “avenue” to ease redevelopment, but Ainslie said success from this has been limited.

“I don’t want more townhouses,” he said.

Choices For Scarborough, a report released last year by Andre Sorensen and Paul Hess for the Cities Lab at UTSC suggested an LRT line along the old Scarborough-Malvern route (12-kilometres long, running north to Sheppard Avenue) could spark development on 208 hectares, or 514 acres, including at Highway 401 and Morningside, where U of T owns the largest block of vacant land in Scarborough.

The shorter, eight-kilometre Crosstown East route ends at UTSC.

- Mike Adler

Open house in Scarborough for light-rail line

News Feb 25, 2016 Scarborough Mirror

There’s a light-rail line promised again to people in East Scarborough, and residents at an open house this Saturday, Feb. 27, can ask about it.

But so far, the City of Toronto hasn’t revealed some basic facts about the Crosstown East, such as when it may be built.

And that’s why Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie says he won’t hold a public meeting of his own on the project “until I have more meat on the bones.”

Announced by Mayor John Tory last month along with news the Scarborough Subway extension was being “optimized” down to one stop, the Crosstown East is similar to the proposed Scarborough-Malvern LRT line shelved by the province in 2009.

Crosstown East is shorter and has fewer stops, but would take basically the same route from Kennedy Station down the centre of Eglinton Avenue, Kingston Road and Morningside Avenue to the University of Toronto Scarborough campus (UTSC).

Ainslie has heard its design is different than the 2009 proposal - “I’m supposed to get two full lanes of traffic and a bike lane” for each side of Kingston, he said - but city transportation planners have yet to set a construction date, or release projected ridership numbers.

In an interview this week, Ainslie said he still has the same concerns he had about the earlier LRT proposal, which the province put off building until 2023.

Will areas along Kingston become isolated by a lack of left turns, he asked, and if people from east of the city are encouraged to use the LRT, where will they park?

City and Metrolinx staff say they’ve prepared to discuss the Crosstown East, the subway extension and other transit projects across Toronto Saturday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Scarborough Civic Centre.

So far, the city says building the Crosstown East will let people ride from UTSC to Pearson International Airport and the East Scarborough route will serve five Neighbourhood Improvement Areas.

The city has studied Kingston Road as an “avenue” to ease redevelopment, but Ainslie said success from this has been limited.

“I don’t want more townhouses,” he said.

Choices For Scarborough, a report released last year by Andre Sorensen and Paul Hess for the Cities Lab at UTSC suggested an LRT line along the old Scarborough-Malvern route (12-kilometres long, running north to Sheppard Avenue) could spark development on 208 hectares, or 514 acres, including at Highway 401 and Morningside, where U of T owns the largest block of vacant land in Scarborough.

The shorter, eight-kilometre Crosstown East route ends at UTSC.

- Mike Adler