Popular event space at 99 Sudbury looking to become a boutique hotel and residence

News Jan 28, 2016 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

The days of attending major concerts and taking a fitness class at 99 Sudbury may become a thing of the past.

A proposal was submitted to the City of Toronto to transform the home of the Glass Factory and The Gym into a 26-storey mixed used building that would be home to a boutique hotel, an event space and have retail and residential uses.

It will also have a portion of the West Toronto Railpath extension on site, between the rail corridor and the proposed building.

It may sound interesting to some, but the residents attending the second community consultation meeting Tuesday night, hosted by Ward 18 councillor Ana Bailao, weren’t impressed especially with the height.

The maximum height allowance for the area is set at 18 metres. This proposed building has a height of 90.5 metres including the mechanical penthouse on the roof.

After the first community meeting in May 2014, a working group was established to help the architects address some of the issues, including built form, neighbourhood fit and transportation. However, as one member of the working group in attendance pointed out, one major concession was not made: the height.

“I still think it’s a big issue that we’re having difficulty reaching an agreement on,” Bailao admitted.

“I think they’ve listened to us on a lot of different issues, such as incorporating the West Toronto Railpath, having the pickup and drop off zones in the site and not on the street, making the restaurant towards the back and having bigger units. They’ve addressed a lot of these issues, but the key issue is the height. And we’re still very much apart on that.”

The majority of the more than 60 people in attendance agree that although the building is appealing design-wise it does not fit in with the neighbourhood and is higher than the surrounding buildings with a two-storey office building, and four-storey townhouses to the east and the set of condos directly across from the site. There is also the issue of increased traffic on an already narrow street, according to residents.

The proposal sites the first six storeys of the building will contain the hotel and event space with restaurant uses. It will have 157 hotel rooms with a spa, amenity space, pool and rooftop terrace. The next 20 storeys will have 190 residential units with 11 per cent of the units being three-bedrooms. Three levels of underground parking will be made, accessible form the east side of the building. There will also be outdoor and indoor amenity spaces for those living in the building. One resident voiced that she was disappointed that there was no park space worked into the proposal, asking what community benefits is the area getting from this development.

The answer to that question, Bailao said, will come later on in the process. The city’s main priority is to get the building right first.

“Community benefits never influence our approval process. We’re always looking for good planning principles no matter what,” she said.

“After that we negotiate the community benefits, but first the most important thing to ask is, is this building ok? Does it fit with the neighbourhood? Can the neighbourhood sustain this kind of growth? Those are the questions we need to answer. And as a community we’re not there yet (to discuss community benefits).”

For more details about 99 Sudbury, visit http://99sudbury.ca/

Popular event space at 99 Sudbury looking to become a boutique hotel and residence

News Jan 28, 2016 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

The days of attending major concerts and taking a fitness class at 99 Sudbury may become a thing of the past.

A proposal was submitted to the City of Toronto to transform the home of the Glass Factory and The Gym into a 26-storey mixed used building that would be home to a boutique hotel, an event space and have retail and residential uses.

It will also have a portion of the West Toronto Railpath extension on site, between the rail corridor and the proposed building.

It may sound interesting to some, but the residents attending the second community consultation meeting Tuesday night, hosted by Ward 18 councillor Ana Bailao, weren’t impressed especially with the height.

The maximum height allowance for the area is set at 18 metres. This proposed building has a height of 90.5 metres including the mechanical penthouse on the roof.

After the first community meeting in May 2014, a working group was established to help the architects address some of the issues, including built form, neighbourhood fit and transportation. However, as one member of the working group in attendance pointed out, one major concession was not made: the height.

“I still think it’s a big issue that we’re having difficulty reaching an agreement on,” Bailao admitted.

“I think they’ve listened to us on a lot of different issues, such as incorporating the West Toronto Railpath, having the pickup and drop off zones in the site and not on the street, making the restaurant towards the back and having bigger units. They’ve addressed a lot of these issues, but the key issue is the height. And we’re still very much apart on that.”

The majority of the more than 60 people in attendance agree that although the building is appealing design-wise it does not fit in with the neighbourhood and is higher than the surrounding buildings with a two-storey office building, and four-storey townhouses to the east and the set of condos directly across from the site. There is also the issue of increased traffic on an already narrow street, according to residents.

The proposal sites the first six storeys of the building will contain the hotel and event space with restaurant uses. It will have 157 hotel rooms with a spa, amenity space, pool and rooftop terrace. The next 20 storeys will have 190 residential units with 11 per cent of the units being three-bedrooms. Three levels of underground parking will be made, accessible form the east side of the building. There will also be outdoor and indoor amenity spaces for those living in the building. One resident voiced that she was disappointed that there was no park space worked into the proposal, asking what community benefits is the area getting from this development.

The answer to that question, Bailao said, will come later on in the process. The city’s main priority is to get the building right first.

“Community benefits never influence our approval process. We’re always looking for good planning principles no matter what,” she said.

“After that we negotiate the community benefits, but first the most important thing to ask is, is this building ok? Does it fit with the neighbourhood? Can the neighbourhood sustain this kind of growth? Those are the questions we need to answer. And as a community we’re not there yet (to discuss community benefits).”

For more details about 99 Sudbury, visit http://99sudbury.ca/

Popular event space at 99 Sudbury looking to become a boutique hotel and residence

News Jan 28, 2016 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

The days of attending major concerts and taking a fitness class at 99 Sudbury may become a thing of the past.

A proposal was submitted to the City of Toronto to transform the home of the Glass Factory and The Gym into a 26-storey mixed used building that would be home to a boutique hotel, an event space and have retail and residential uses.

It will also have a portion of the West Toronto Railpath extension on site, between the rail corridor and the proposed building.

It may sound interesting to some, but the residents attending the second community consultation meeting Tuesday night, hosted by Ward 18 councillor Ana Bailao, weren’t impressed especially with the height.

The maximum height allowance for the area is set at 18 metres. This proposed building has a height of 90.5 metres including the mechanical penthouse on the roof.

After the first community meeting in May 2014, a working group was established to help the architects address some of the issues, including built form, neighbourhood fit and transportation. However, as one member of the working group in attendance pointed out, one major concession was not made: the height.

“I still think it’s a big issue that we’re having difficulty reaching an agreement on,” Bailao admitted.

“I think they’ve listened to us on a lot of different issues, such as incorporating the West Toronto Railpath, having the pickup and drop off zones in the site and not on the street, making the restaurant towards the back and having bigger units. They’ve addressed a lot of these issues, but the key issue is the height. And we’re still very much apart on that.”

The majority of the more than 60 people in attendance agree that although the building is appealing design-wise it does not fit in with the neighbourhood and is higher than the surrounding buildings with a two-storey office building, and four-storey townhouses to the east and the set of condos directly across from the site. There is also the issue of increased traffic on an already narrow street, according to residents.

The proposal sites the first six storeys of the building will contain the hotel and event space with restaurant uses. It will have 157 hotel rooms with a spa, amenity space, pool and rooftop terrace. The next 20 storeys will have 190 residential units with 11 per cent of the units being three-bedrooms. Three levels of underground parking will be made, accessible form the east side of the building. There will also be outdoor and indoor amenity spaces for those living in the building. One resident voiced that she was disappointed that there was no park space worked into the proposal, asking what community benefits is the area getting from this development.

The answer to that question, Bailao said, will come later on in the process. The city’s main priority is to get the building right first.

“Community benefits never influence our approval process. We’re always looking for good planning principles no matter what,” she said.

“After that we negotiate the community benefits, but first the most important thing to ask is, is this building ok? Does it fit with the neighbourhood? Can the neighbourhood sustain this kind of growth? Those are the questions we need to answer. And as a community we’re not there yet (to discuss community benefits).”

For more details about 99 Sudbury, visit http://99sudbury.ca/