Queen 501 split at Humber Loop ‘brutal’ in evening rush: rider

News Jan 22, 2016 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

The TTC increased service daily on Toronto’s iconic 501 Queen streetcar line to every 10 minutes or less all day effective this month, is welcome news to some south Etobicoke riders who reported wait times of up to 45 minutes in the past.

But the TTC’s decision to split the 501 route at the Humber Loop from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily has left one south Etobicoke rider wanting.

Among the 501 route changes, the TTC recently announced a “temporary” route split at Humber Loop on the line, which runs west from Neville Park in the Beach to the Long Branch Loop.

That means riders headed either west or east of Humber Loop would get off their streetcar, which would turn around, to board another to continue on their route. The wait time for the next streetcar is now 10 minutes or less.

Jennifer Mozetic has lived in Humber Bay Shores for 10 years. She takes the 501 daily to commute back and forth to work downtown.

Mozetic expressed confusion about the temporary nature of the TTC’s route split. She reported four TTC 501 streetcar operators have told her the change will be permanent.

That concerns Mozetic, who like much of the 501 streetcar’s ridership west of the Humber Loop, is travelling only a few more stops to home and would prefer not to switch streetcars.

“It’s just brutal on the way home,” Mozetic said. “They make all the people get off a full streetcar. I’m faster walking home the 12 minutes than waiting for another streetcar.

“I’d get it if the TTC did this 10 years ago. But it’s crazy with all the condos here now. It will be crazier in two years (once all the approved Humber Bay condos are built).”

The TTC added three 501 transfer-free 501 streetcars in the morning rush leaving Long Branch Loop at 7:19, 7:29 and 7:39, which Mozetic takes and confirmed travel through Humber Loop direct to downtown.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross confirmed earlier this month the TTC’s route split at Humber Bay is subject to revision.

“We want to study it,” he said. “We’ll keep an eye on the route. We’re not making the changes and then walking away from it. We want the flexibility to tweak around the edges as necessary.

“Any changes we’d make in the future would be for the better.”

Ross acknowledged the route split at Humber Loop is inconvenient.

But he said it is necessary in order to maintain the TTC’s commitment to 10-minute or less service reliability on the 501.

“We absolutely understand that making a transfer is an inconvenience. But overall, it will make the trip more reliable rather than a wait of 20 to 30 minutes. One of our goals is to reduce the number of short-turns,” Ross said.

The TTC short-turned more than 600 501 streetcars in the first week of January 2015 versus 48 last week, Ross reported. A short-turn is when a streetcar turns around before the end of the route.

The 501 Queen route is the longest streetcar route in the world, he added.

“It’s challenging because the 501 route is so long. Invariably, we’d not be able to maintain that schedule every 10 minutes because of factors beyond the TTC’s control, like traffic congestion,” Ross said when asked why the TTC doesn’t run all the 501 streetcars the entire route from Neville Park to Long Branch Loop.

“(Turning some streetcars) reinstates some rigour to the route.”

Ross confirmed some 501 streetcars will run the length of the route from Neville Park in the Beach through Humber Loop to Long Branch Loop. But he couldn’t quote the percentage of streetcars.

Daily from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., some 501 Queen streetcars will operate from Neville Park through to Long Branch, while others will be turned back at Humber Loop.

The 301 Queen Blue Service will operate between Neville Park and Long Branch through Humber Loop between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m.

Mozetic argued Humber Bay residents need a direct route to downtown. The largely condominium community boasts a population of 18,000 and growing.

The TTC operates a Humber Express Bus service to downtown Toronto. The extra-fare service operates in the morning and afternoon peak periods.

But Mozetic argued the express bus doesn’t operate at enough convenient times for her to take it regularly.

“Humber Bay residents have been getting the short end of the stick from the TTC for too long, and now with this change it’s the nail in the coffin,” Mozetic said. “It is very unfair to expect such a growing community to not have a direct line to downtown.”

Queen 501 split at Humber Loop ‘brutal’ in evening rush: rider

New 10-minute service frequency standard on 501 necessitates route split: TTC

News Jan 22, 2016 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

The TTC increased service daily on Toronto’s iconic 501 Queen streetcar line to every 10 minutes or less all day effective this month, is welcome news to some south Etobicoke riders who reported wait times of up to 45 minutes in the past.

But the TTC’s decision to split the 501 route at the Humber Loop from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily has left one south Etobicoke rider wanting.

Among the 501 route changes, the TTC recently announced a “temporary” route split at Humber Loop on the line, which runs west from Neville Park in the Beach to the Long Branch Loop.

That means riders headed either west or east of Humber Loop would get off their streetcar, which would turn around, to board another to continue on their route. The wait time for the next streetcar is now 10 minutes or less.

Jennifer Mozetic has lived in Humber Bay Shores for 10 years. She takes the 501 daily to commute back and forth to work downtown.

Mozetic expressed confusion about the temporary nature of the TTC’s route split. She reported four TTC 501 streetcar operators have told her the change will be permanent.

That concerns Mozetic, who like much of the 501 streetcar’s ridership west of the Humber Loop, is travelling only a few more stops to home and would prefer not to switch streetcars.

“It’s just brutal on the way home,” Mozetic said. “They make all the people get off a full streetcar. I’m faster walking home the 12 minutes than waiting for another streetcar.

“I’d get it if the TTC did this 10 years ago. But it’s crazy with all the condos here now. It will be crazier in two years (once all the approved Humber Bay condos are built).”

The TTC added three 501 transfer-free 501 streetcars in the morning rush leaving Long Branch Loop at 7:19, 7:29 and 7:39, which Mozetic takes and confirmed travel through Humber Loop direct to downtown.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross confirmed earlier this month the TTC’s route split at Humber Bay is subject to revision.

“We want to study it,” he said. “We’ll keep an eye on the route. We’re not making the changes and then walking away from it. We want the flexibility to tweak around the edges as necessary.

“Any changes we’d make in the future would be for the better.”

Ross acknowledged the route split at Humber Loop is inconvenient.

But he said it is necessary in order to maintain the TTC’s commitment to 10-minute or less service reliability on the 501.

“We absolutely understand that making a transfer is an inconvenience. But overall, it will make the trip more reliable rather than a wait of 20 to 30 minutes. One of our goals is to reduce the number of short-turns,” Ross said.

The TTC short-turned more than 600 501 streetcars in the first week of January 2015 versus 48 last week, Ross reported. A short-turn is when a streetcar turns around before the end of the route.

The 501 Queen route is the longest streetcar route in the world, he added.

“It’s challenging because the 501 route is so long. Invariably, we’d not be able to maintain that schedule every 10 minutes because of factors beyond the TTC’s control, like traffic congestion,” Ross said when asked why the TTC doesn’t run all the 501 streetcars the entire route from Neville Park to Long Branch Loop.

“(Turning some streetcars) reinstates some rigour to the route.”

Ross confirmed some 501 streetcars will run the length of the route from Neville Park in the Beach through Humber Loop to Long Branch Loop. But he couldn’t quote the percentage of streetcars.

Daily from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., some 501 Queen streetcars will operate from Neville Park through to Long Branch, while others will be turned back at Humber Loop.

The 301 Queen Blue Service will operate between Neville Park and Long Branch through Humber Loop between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m.

Mozetic argued Humber Bay residents need a direct route to downtown. The largely condominium community boasts a population of 18,000 and growing.

The TTC operates a Humber Express Bus service to downtown Toronto. The extra-fare service operates in the morning and afternoon peak periods.

But Mozetic argued the express bus doesn’t operate at enough convenient times for her to take it regularly.

“Humber Bay residents have been getting the short end of the stick from the TTC for too long, and now with this change it’s the nail in the coffin,” Mozetic said. “It is very unfair to expect such a growing community to not have a direct line to downtown.”

Queen 501 split at Humber Loop ‘brutal’ in evening rush: rider

New 10-minute service frequency standard on 501 necessitates route split: TTC

News Jan 22, 2016 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

The TTC increased service daily on Toronto’s iconic 501 Queen streetcar line to every 10 minutes or less all day effective this month, is welcome news to some south Etobicoke riders who reported wait times of up to 45 minutes in the past.

But the TTC’s decision to split the 501 route at the Humber Loop from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily has left one south Etobicoke rider wanting.

Among the 501 route changes, the TTC recently announced a “temporary” route split at Humber Loop on the line, which runs west from Neville Park in the Beach to the Long Branch Loop.

That means riders headed either west or east of Humber Loop would get off their streetcar, which would turn around, to board another to continue on their route. The wait time for the next streetcar is now 10 minutes or less.

Jennifer Mozetic has lived in Humber Bay Shores for 10 years. She takes the 501 daily to commute back and forth to work downtown.

Mozetic expressed confusion about the temporary nature of the TTC’s route split. She reported four TTC 501 streetcar operators have told her the change will be permanent.

That concerns Mozetic, who like much of the 501 streetcar’s ridership west of the Humber Loop, is travelling only a few more stops to home and would prefer not to switch streetcars.

“It’s just brutal on the way home,” Mozetic said. “They make all the people get off a full streetcar. I’m faster walking home the 12 minutes than waiting for another streetcar.

“I’d get it if the TTC did this 10 years ago. But it’s crazy with all the condos here now. It will be crazier in two years (once all the approved Humber Bay condos are built).”

The TTC added three 501 transfer-free 501 streetcars in the morning rush leaving Long Branch Loop at 7:19, 7:29 and 7:39, which Mozetic takes and confirmed travel through Humber Loop direct to downtown.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross confirmed earlier this month the TTC’s route split at Humber Bay is subject to revision.

“We want to study it,” he said. “We’ll keep an eye on the route. We’re not making the changes and then walking away from it. We want the flexibility to tweak around the edges as necessary.

“Any changes we’d make in the future would be for the better.”

Ross acknowledged the route split at Humber Loop is inconvenient.

But he said it is necessary in order to maintain the TTC’s commitment to 10-minute or less service reliability on the 501.

“We absolutely understand that making a transfer is an inconvenience. But overall, it will make the trip more reliable rather than a wait of 20 to 30 minutes. One of our goals is to reduce the number of short-turns,” Ross said.

The TTC short-turned more than 600 501 streetcars in the first week of January 2015 versus 48 last week, Ross reported. A short-turn is when a streetcar turns around before the end of the route.

The 501 Queen route is the longest streetcar route in the world, he added.

“It’s challenging because the 501 route is so long. Invariably, we’d not be able to maintain that schedule every 10 minutes because of factors beyond the TTC’s control, like traffic congestion,” Ross said when asked why the TTC doesn’t run all the 501 streetcars the entire route from Neville Park to Long Branch Loop.

“(Turning some streetcars) reinstates some rigour to the route.”

Ross confirmed some 501 streetcars will run the length of the route from Neville Park in the Beach through Humber Loop to Long Branch Loop. But he couldn’t quote the percentage of streetcars.

Daily from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., some 501 Queen streetcars will operate from Neville Park through to Long Branch, while others will be turned back at Humber Loop.

The 301 Queen Blue Service will operate between Neville Park and Long Branch through Humber Loop between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m.

Mozetic argued Humber Bay residents need a direct route to downtown. The largely condominium community boasts a population of 18,000 and growing.

The TTC operates a Humber Express Bus service to downtown Toronto. The extra-fare service operates in the morning and afternoon peak periods.

But Mozetic argued the express bus doesn’t operate at enough convenient times for her to take it regularly.

“Humber Bay residents have been getting the short end of the stick from the TTC for too long, and now with this change it’s the nail in the coffin,” Mozetic said. “It is very unfair to expect such a growing community to not have a direct line to downtown.”