Emblematic Leslieville mural to be replaced

News Jan 19, 2016 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

One of the east-end’s most photographed spots – the iconic Leslieville mural at the northeast corner of Queen Street East and Jones Avenue – will soon be getting a new look.

The wall of the building on which the often-defaced mural is painted is deteriorating and needs to be repaired sooner than later.

Attempts to identify its original artist have been unsuccessful. According to copyright law, the creator of the mural, which is dedicated to the first principal of Leslieville Public School and the author of the song the Maple Leaf Forever, Alexander Muir, is the only person who could authentically restore or alter it.

“You can’t just have another artist paint somebody’s work,” Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said during a recent interview.

“We have looked for this person and we continue looking for this person.”

In July, local artist Jim Thierry Bravo approached the building’s owner, Andrew Elia, with a proposal for a new mural for the wall. Bravo’s concept, which featured an impressionist depiction of Ashbridges Bay, took the community by surprise and was promptly rejected.

“Long story short, that one didn’t go over too well. It was a big thumbs down,” Fletcher said.

Neighbours felt a strong consultative process was the way to go for the prominent wall.

“This is a big process because it has to be done right,” Fletcher said.

Elia, whose family has owned the property at 1160 Queen St. E. for several decades, is open to working with the community to find the best design for a new mural.

“The Leslieville mural has sort of come to identify Leslieville,” he said. “The problem is now that the mural has sort of lived its life expectancy.”

Volunteers from the Leslieville Historical Society, members of the Leslieville Business Improvement Area, residents, and Elia, in partnership with the Ralph Thornton Community Centre and Councillor Fletcher’s office, formed a committee to discuss the future of the landmark site.

What they’ve come up with is a plan to fix the wall and, with a grant from the city, commission a new mural that will embody the vibrancy of the Leslieville community and become a signature image for the neighbourhood.

Their first step was to compose a design brief for a request for proposals for a new mural. This document was submitted to the City of Toronto’s Public Realm Office, which provided them with a list of a dozen mural artists through its StreetART program.

On Monday, Jan. 18, east-end residents and business owners were invited to the nearby Project Gallery to check out and have their say on three final design proposals.

Mural artists Dan Bergeron and Elicser Elliott were on hand to discuss their concepts. Mediah (a.k.a. Evond Blake) was not able to attend.

Bergeron’s design, titled L-E-S-L-I-E-V-I-L-L-E, features repetitive deconstruction of the letters that make up the neighbourhood’s name. This repetition represents the range of visions of and for the neighbourhood from the eyes, hearts and minds of those who visit and live in Leslieville, while the deconstruction of the letters aims to represent the current state of change throughout the area.

Elliott’s concept explores Leslieville’s direct connection with its maple trees. He envisions a mural that celebrates the greatness of what’s to come and what came before through an uplifting character and bright colours with a modern take on a traditional landscape.

Blake is proposing a vibrant, fun, and dynamic mural that has two colour schemes inspired by the Canadian maple tree and fall colours. His design also features a maple leaf design that pays homage to the community’s beloved Maple Leaf Forever tree, which was felled during a summer 2013 storm, as well as a cyclist representing the Queen Street East’s connection to the downtown core.

Those unable to attend the open house have until Sunday, Jan. 24 to provide input online by visiting https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2FMXFL8

“The whole idea is to get people’s feedback,” said Brad Daniels, a property owner who is on the mural committee. “We’ll then take that feedback and incorporate it. I think this is the best possible process.”

The committee will take the community’s feedback into account when it selects the winning design this spring. The goal is to complete the mural by the late summer or early fall.

– with files from TorStar News Service

Emblematic Leslieville mural to be replaced

Three final designs unveiled at open house

News Jan 19, 2016 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

One of the east-end’s most photographed spots – the iconic Leslieville mural at the northeast corner of Queen Street East and Jones Avenue – will soon be getting a new look.

The wall of the building on which the often-defaced mural is painted is deteriorating and needs to be repaired sooner than later.

Attempts to identify its original artist have been unsuccessful. According to copyright law, the creator of the mural, which is dedicated to the first principal of Leslieville Public School and the author of the song the Maple Leaf Forever, Alexander Muir, is the only person who could authentically restore or alter it.

“You can’t just have another artist paint somebody’s work,” Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said during a recent interview.

“We have looked for this person and we continue looking for this person.”

In July, local artist Jim Thierry Bravo approached the building’s owner, Andrew Elia, with a proposal for a new mural for the wall. Bravo’s concept, which featured an impressionist depiction of Ashbridges Bay, took the community by surprise and was promptly rejected.

“Long story short, that one didn’t go over too well. It was a big thumbs down,” Fletcher said.

Neighbours felt a strong consultative process was the way to go for the prominent wall.

“This is a big process because it has to be done right,” Fletcher said.

Elia, whose family has owned the property at 1160 Queen St. E. for several decades, is open to working with the community to find the best design for a new mural.

“The Leslieville mural has sort of come to identify Leslieville,” he said. “The problem is now that the mural has sort of lived its life expectancy.”

Volunteers from the Leslieville Historical Society, members of the Leslieville Business Improvement Area, residents, and Elia, in partnership with the Ralph Thornton Community Centre and Councillor Fletcher’s office, formed a committee to discuss the future of the landmark site.

What they’ve come up with is a plan to fix the wall and, with a grant from the city, commission a new mural that will embody the vibrancy of the Leslieville community and become a signature image for the neighbourhood.

Their first step was to compose a design brief for a request for proposals for a new mural. This document was submitted to the City of Toronto’s Public Realm Office, which provided them with a list of a dozen mural artists through its StreetART program.

On Monday, Jan. 18, east-end residents and business owners were invited to the nearby Project Gallery to check out and have their say on three final design proposals.

Mural artists Dan Bergeron and Elicser Elliott were on hand to discuss their concepts. Mediah (a.k.a. Evond Blake) was not able to attend.

Bergeron’s design, titled L-E-S-L-I-E-V-I-L-L-E, features repetitive deconstruction of the letters that make up the neighbourhood’s name. This repetition represents the range of visions of and for the neighbourhood from the eyes, hearts and minds of those who visit and live in Leslieville, while the deconstruction of the letters aims to represent the current state of change throughout the area.

Elliott’s concept explores Leslieville’s direct connection with its maple trees. He envisions a mural that celebrates the greatness of what’s to come and what came before through an uplifting character and bright colours with a modern take on a traditional landscape.

Blake is proposing a vibrant, fun, and dynamic mural that has two colour schemes inspired by the Canadian maple tree and fall colours. His design also features a maple leaf design that pays homage to the community’s beloved Maple Leaf Forever tree, which was felled during a summer 2013 storm, as well as a cyclist representing the Queen Street East’s connection to the downtown core.

Those unable to attend the open house have until Sunday, Jan. 24 to provide input online by visiting https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2FMXFL8

“The whole idea is to get people’s feedback,” said Brad Daniels, a property owner who is on the mural committee. “We’ll then take that feedback and incorporate it. I think this is the best possible process.”

The committee will take the community’s feedback into account when it selects the winning design this spring. The goal is to complete the mural by the late summer or early fall.

– with files from TorStar News Service

Emblematic Leslieville mural to be replaced

Three final designs unveiled at open house

News Jan 19, 2016 by Joanna Lavoie Beach Mirror

One of the east-end’s most photographed spots – the iconic Leslieville mural at the northeast corner of Queen Street East and Jones Avenue – will soon be getting a new look.

The wall of the building on which the often-defaced mural is painted is deteriorating and needs to be repaired sooner than later.

Attempts to identify its original artist have been unsuccessful. According to copyright law, the creator of the mural, which is dedicated to the first principal of Leslieville Public School and the author of the song the Maple Leaf Forever, Alexander Muir, is the only person who could authentically restore or alter it.

“You can’t just have another artist paint somebody’s work,” Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said during a recent interview.

“We have looked for this person and we continue looking for this person.”

In July, local artist Jim Thierry Bravo approached the building’s owner, Andrew Elia, with a proposal for a new mural for the wall. Bravo’s concept, which featured an impressionist depiction of Ashbridges Bay, took the community by surprise and was promptly rejected.

“Long story short, that one didn’t go over too well. It was a big thumbs down,” Fletcher said.

Neighbours felt a strong consultative process was the way to go for the prominent wall.

“This is a big process because it has to be done right,” Fletcher said.

Elia, whose family has owned the property at 1160 Queen St. E. for several decades, is open to working with the community to find the best design for a new mural.

“The Leslieville mural has sort of come to identify Leslieville,” he said. “The problem is now that the mural has sort of lived its life expectancy.”

Volunteers from the Leslieville Historical Society, members of the Leslieville Business Improvement Area, residents, and Elia, in partnership with the Ralph Thornton Community Centre and Councillor Fletcher’s office, formed a committee to discuss the future of the landmark site.

What they’ve come up with is a plan to fix the wall and, with a grant from the city, commission a new mural that will embody the vibrancy of the Leslieville community and become a signature image for the neighbourhood.

Their first step was to compose a design brief for a request for proposals for a new mural. This document was submitted to the City of Toronto’s Public Realm Office, which provided them with a list of a dozen mural artists through its StreetART program.

On Monday, Jan. 18, east-end residents and business owners were invited to the nearby Project Gallery to check out and have their say on three final design proposals.

Mural artists Dan Bergeron and Elicser Elliott were on hand to discuss their concepts. Mediah (a.k.a. Evond Blake) was not able to attend.

Bergeron’s design, titled L-E-S-L-I-E-V-I-L-L-E, features repetitive deconstruction of the letters that make up the neighbourhood’s name. This repetition represents the range of visions of and for the neighbourhood from the eyes, hearts and minds of those who visit and live in Leslieville, while the deconstruction of the letters aims to represent the current state of change throughout the area.

Elliott’s concept explores Leslieville’s direct connection with its maple trees. He envisions a mural that celebrates the greatness of what’s to come and what came before through an uplifting character and bright colours with a modern take on a traditional landscape.

Blake is proposing a vibrant, fun, and dynamic mural that has two colour schemes inspired by the Canadian maple tree and fall colours. His design also features a maple leaf design that pays homage to the community’s beloved Maple Leaf Forever tree, which was felled during a summer 2013 storm, as well as a cyclist representing the Queen Street East’s connection to the downtown core.

Those unable to attend the open house have until Sunday, Jan. 24 to provide input online by visiting https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2FMXFL8

“The whole idea is to get people’s feedback,” said Brad Daniels, a property owner who is on the mural committee. “We’ll then take that feedback and incorporate it. I think this is the best possible process.”

The committee will take the community’s feedback into account when it selects the winning design this spring. The goal is to complete the mural by the late summer or early fall.

– with files from TorStar News Service