FoodShare Toronto to receive Ontario Trillium Foundation grant

News Jan 14, 2016 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

FoodShare Toronto is one of the more than 300 organizations receiving Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) grants.

The Bloor West and Dufferin streets-area non-profit agency that works to improve access to affordable and healthy food, received funding for the creation of an indigenous-based sustainable gardening curriculum. FoodShare has been collaborating with The Three Sisters’ House, whose mission is to empower people by raising awareness and sharing the wisdom learned from Indigenous ancestors.

The program received a $75,000 grant from OTF, an agency of the Ontario government and Canada’s largest granting foundation. More than $110 million is awarded annually to as many as 1,000 non-profit and charitable organizations across the province.

“It means a lot,” Patrick Nadjiwon, director and founder of Three Sisters’ House, told The Villager of the funding. “I can’t say enough how supportive FoodShare has been of Three Sisters.”

Nadjiwon is currently working on designing the curriculum for primary, junior and senior students at four schools in downtown Toronto. It will be based on First Nations’ relationship with the land and will teach children, among other things, how to create gardens at home, in backyards, indoors or on balconies. It will include ceremony, such as smudging, and talk of the four sacred medicines: cedar, sage, tobacco and sweet grass. The curriculum is scheduled to be rolled out in March, he said.

“I’m looking forward to working with the students,” Nadjiwon said.

Nadjiwon grew up on the Chippewas of Nawash reserve north of Owen Sound where he learned food storing practices, such as hanging cored apples on a string and creating insulated potato pits for the winter – practices he teaches today.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation announcement earlier this month was celebrated with the help of the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport Michael Coteau. The foundation is investing 326 initiatives it says will positively impact almost one million people across Ontario.

Of the total number of grants awarded, 287 are for community projects and 39 will support larger, province-wide projects.

“The grant review teams have gone above and beyond to ensure that OTF is making the right decisions when making investments in communities,” said Janet Yale, board chair of the Ontario Trillium Foundation, in a statement. “Congratulations to all our grantees – I am looking forward to hearing about your work and the successful stories that flow from your initiatives.”

To find out more, visit www.otf.ca

FoodShare Toronto to receive Ontario Trillium Foundation grant

Funds will be used to help Three Sisters’ House create a First Nations food curriculum for downtown schools

News Jan 14, 2016 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

FoodShare Toronto is one of the more than 300 organizations receiving Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) grants.

The Bloor West and Dufferin streets-area non-profit agency that works to improve access to affordable and healthy food, received funding for the creation of an indigenous-based sustainable gardening curriculum. FoodShare has been collaborating with The Three Sisters’ House, whose mission is to empower people by raising awareness and sharing the wisdom learned from Indigenous ancestors.

The program received a $75,000 grant from OTF, an agency of the Ontario government and Canada’s largest granting foundation. More than $110 million is awarded annually to as many as 1,000 non-profit and charitable organizations across the province.

“It means a lot,” Patrick Nadjiwon, director and founder of Three Sisters’ House, told The Villager of the funding. “I can’t say enough how supportive FoodShare has been of Three Sisters.”

Nadjiwon is currently working on designing the curriculum for primary, junior and senior students at four schools in downtown Toronto. It will be based on First Nations’ relationship with the land and will teach children, among other things, how to create gardens at home, in backyards, indoors or on balconies. It will include ceremony, such as smudging, and talk of the four sacred medicines: cedar, sage, tobacco and sweet grass. The curriculum is scheduled to be rolled out in March, he said.

“I’m looking forward to working with the students,” Nadjiwon said.

Nadjiwon grew up on the Chippewas of Nawash reserve north of Owen Sound where he learned food storing practices, such as hanging cored apples on a string and creating insulated potato pits for the winter – practices he teaches today.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation announcement earlier this month was celebrated with the help of the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport Michael Coteau. The foundation is investing 326 initiatives it says will positively impact almost one million people across Ontario.

Of the total number of grants awarded, 287 are for community projects and 39 will support larger, province-wide projects.

“The grant review teams have gone above and beyond to ensure that OTF is making the right decisions when making investments in communities,” said Janet Yale, board chair of the Ontario Trillium Foundation, in a statement. “Congratulations to all our grantees – I am looking forward to hearing about your work and the successful stories that flow from your initiatives.”

To find out more, visit www.otf.ca

FoodShare Toronto to receive Ontario Trillium Foundation grant

Funds will be used to help Three Sisters’ House create a First Nations food curriculum for downtown schools

News Jan 14, 2016 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

FoodShare Toronto is one of the more than 300 organizations receiving Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) grants.

The Bloor West and Dufferin streets-area non-profit agency that works to improve access to affordable and healthy food, received funding for the creation of an indigenous-based sustainable gardening curriculum. FoodShare has been collaborating with The Three Sisters’ House, whose mission is to empower people by raising awareness and sharing the wisdom learned from Indigenous ancestors.

The program received a $75,000 grant from OTF, an agency of the Ontario government and Canada’s largest granting foundation. More than $110 million is awarded annually to as many as 1,000 non-profit and charitable organizations across the province.

“It means a lot,” Patrick Nadjiwon, director and founder of Three Sisters’ House, told The Villager of the funding. “I can’t say enough how supportive FoodShare has been of Three Sisters.”

Nadjiwon is currently working on designing the curriculum for primary, junior and senior students at four schools in downtown Toronto. It will be based on First Nations’ relationship with the land and will teach children, among other things, how to create gardens at home, in backyards, indoors or on balconies. It will include ceremony, such as smudging, and talk of the four sacred medicines: cedar, sage, tobacco and sweet grass. The curriculum is scheduled to be rolled out in March, he said.

“I’m looking forward to working with the students,” Nadjiwon said.

Nadjiwon grew up on the Chippewas of Nawash reserve north of Owen Sound where he learned food storing practices, such as hanging cored apples on a string and creating insulated potato pits for the winter – practices he teaches today.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation announcement earlier this month was celebrated with the help of the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport Michael Coteau. The foundation is investing 326 initiatives it says will positively impact almost one million people across Ontario.

Of the total number of grants awarded, 287 are for community projects and 39 will support larger, province-wide projects.

“The grant review teams have gone above and beyond to ensure that OTF is making the right decisions when making investments in communities,” said Janet Yale, board chair of the Ontario Trillium Foundation, in a statement. “Congratulations to all our grantees – I am looking forward to hearing about your work and the successful stories that flow from your initiatives.”

To find out more, visit www.otf.ca