Toronto police officers from 11, 12 and 13 divisions speak at community safety forum hosted by Councillor Cesar Palacio

News Nov 25, 2015 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

It was a homecoming of sorts, Toronto police Chief Mark Saunders told the audience at a community safety forum at Joseph J. Piccininni Community Centre Monday, Nov. 23.

Toronto’s top cop joined senior officers from divisions 11, 13, and 12, which Saunders once commanded, for the forum, hosted by Davenport Councillor Cesar Palacio and attended by newly elected Davenport MP Julie Dzerowicz.

Last year at this time, “Chief Bill Blair was in my position now and some of the leaders here were in my position,” he told the dozens of community members.

“Toronto is still the safest urban city in North America to live,” said Saunders, who was appointed chief of police in April. “No matter what the naysayers say, it’s still the city of choice to live in, according to reputable magazines.”

Saunders, who said he “understands the importance of listening to each other,” wanted to devote as much time as possible listening to residents’ issues.

Yet, before the question and answer period, superintendents from each division presented an overall look at what’s been happening crime wise in their and other neighbourhoods.

Looking at the seven major crime indicators – assaults, sexual assaults, robbery, break and enters, auto thefts, theft over $5,000 and murder ­– 13 Division’s Insp. Anil Anand said his division has seen a progressive decline in most categories.

The incidents of break and enters have remained stable, while incidents of car thefts have increased by five per cent.

There has been one murder within 13 Division, which Anand said he wasn’t at liberty to discuss.

“The information we’ve received from you folks (has) made a difference,” Anand said, crediting residents for their vigilance.

Twelve Division’s Insp. Reuben Stroble thanked everyone for attending the safety forum, acknowledging people lead busy lives.

“We’re doing really well in 12 Division. We’re addressing your concerns,” he said. “Every week, we have a divisional crime meeting when we look at the problems in each neighbourhood and decide what we can do to address those issues and develop strategies.”

There have been four homicides within 12 Division this year, one of which happened in Davenport. It was domestic related, Stroble said, and solved that day.

“There is no worry for you as a community,” he said.

There has been as many as 24 shootings in 12 Division, but none in the Davenport area – “your community is doing very well.”

There is an old proverb that says, ‘It takes a village to raise a child.’ Eleven Division Supt. Heinz Kuck cited that phrase pointing out everyone in the community is all part of this “united village.”

“We have to work collectively to keep our children safe,” said Kuck, a father himself. “We have to form partnerships – we’ll do our part, you’ve got to do your part.”

Kuck said 11 Division officers works hard to nurture relationships within its communities. He cited the recent sleep-out on the station’s front lawn, which brought together officers, members of the Community Police Liaison Committee (CPLC) and residents. Its purpose was to experience, vicariously, the hardships of the homeless.

The initiative not only collected more than 3,000 pounds of winter clothing for the homeless, but brought Saunders out in solidarity.

“Low and behold, he was wearing his pajamas – flannel,” Kuck said, garnering laughs from the audience. “Twenty-four hours earlier, he was at the Chief of Police gala.”

There have been two homicides this year so far in 11 Division, Const. Rob Tajti, its crime analyst, said, one of which has been solved. There were three sexual assaults in High Park, which the division responded to with an “all hands on deck” approach.

Plainclothes officers descended upon the park as did foot and bike patrol officers.

“The offender was arrested and is currently awaiting trial,” Tajti said.

Two weeks ago, a fourth bank was robbed in a series – two in 11 and two in 14 divisions. The culprits were apprehended trying to escape in a cab, Tajti said.

Irwin Patterson, a resident and member of the CPLC, told Saunders his concern for the cyclists and pedestrians who don’t obey traffic signals and stop signs.

“We’ve got to educate the people,” he said.

Saunders pointed out that as a pedestrian or cyclist, even though they might have the right of way, doesn’t mean it’s safe. “Every person should check first before proceeding,” he said.

Members of the St. Clair Gardens Business Improvement Area shared concerns about certain bars that are open late, leave doors open and disrupt residents who live nearby.

Palacio said that a number of inspections by both police and the city’s municipal licensing and standards committee have been undertaken and some charges have been laid.

Toronto police officers from 11, 12 and 13 divisions speak at community safety forum hosted by Councillor Cesar Palacio

Police Chief Mark Saunders says Toronto is still a safe place to live

News Nov 25, 2015 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

It was a homecoming of sorts, Toronto police Chief Mark Saunders told the audience at a community safety forum at Joseph J. Piccininni Community Centre Monday, Nov. 23.

Toronto’s top cop joined senior officers from divisions 11, 13, and 12, which Saunders once commanded, for the forum, hosted by Davenport Councillor Cesar Palacio and attended by newly elected Davenport MP Julie Dzerowicz.

Last year at this time, “Chief Bill Blair was in my position now and some of the leaders here were in my position,” he told the dozens of community members.

“Toronto is still the safest urban city in North America to live,” said Saunders, who was appointed chief of police in April. “No matter what the naysayers say, it’s still the city of choice to live in, according to reputable magazines.”

Saunders, who said he “understands the importance of listening to each other,” wanted to devote as much time as possible listening to residents’ issues.

Yet, before the question and answer period, superintendents from each division presented an overall look at what’s been happening crime wise in their and other neighbourhoods.

Looking at the seven major crime indicators – assaults, sexual assaults, robbery, break and enters, auto thefts, theft over $5,000 and murder ­– 13 Division’s Insp. Anil Anand said his division has seen a progressive decline in most categories.

The incidents of break and enters have remained stable, while incidents of car thefts have increased by five per cent.

There has been one murder within 13 Division, which Anand said he wasn’t at liberty to discuss.

“The information we’ve received from you folks (has) made a difference,” Anand said, crediting residents for their vigilance.

Twelve Division’s Insp. Reuben Stroble thanked everyone for attending the safety forum, acknowledging people lead busy lives.

“We’re doing really well in 12 Division. We’re addressing your concerns,” he said. “Every week, we have a divisional crime meeting when we look at the problems in each neighbourhood and decide what we can do to address those issues and develop strategies.”

There have been four homicides within 12 Division this year, one of which happened in Davenport. It was domestic related, Stroble said, and solved that day.

“There is no worry for you as a community,” he said.

There has been as many as 24 shootings in 12 Division, but none in the Davenport area – “your community is doing very well.”

There is an old proverb that says, ‘It takes a village to raise a child.’ Eleven Division Supt. Heinz Kuck cited that phrase pointing out everyone in the community is all part of this “united village.”

“We have to work collectively to keep our children safe,” said Kuck, a father himself. “We have to form partnerships – we’ll do our part, you’ve got to do your part.”

Kuck said 11 Division officers works hard to nurture relationships within its communities. He cited the recent sleep-out on the station’s front lawn, which brought together officers, members of the Community Police Liaison Committee (CPLC) and residents. Its purpose was to experience, vicariously, the hardships of the homeless.

The initiative not only collected more than 3,000 pounds of winter clothing for the homeless, but brought Saunders out in solidarity.

“Low and behold, he was wearing his pajamas – flannel,” Kuck said, garnering laughs from the audience. “Twenty-four hours earlier, he was at the Chief of Police gala.”

There have been two homicides this year so far in 11 Division, Const. Rob Tajti, its crime analyst, said, one of which has been solved. There were three sexual assaults in High Park, which the division responded to with an “all hands on deck” approach.

Plainclothes officers descended upon the park as did foot and bike patrol officers.

“The offender was arrested and is currently awaiting trial,” Tajti said.

Two weeks ago, a fourth bank was robbed in a series – two in 11 and two in 14 divisions. The culprits were apprehended trying to escape in a cab, Tajti said.

Irwin Patterson, a resident and member of the CPLC, told Saunders his concern for the cyclists and pedestrians who don’t obey traffic signals and stop signs.

“We’ve got to educate the people,” he said.

Saunders pointed out that as a pedestrian or cyclist, even though they might have the right of way, doesn’t mean it’s safe. “Every person should check first before proceeding,” he said.

Members of the St. Clair Gardens Business Improvement Area shared concerns about certain bars that are open late, leave doors open and disrupt residents who live nearby.

Palacio said that a number of inspections by both police and the city’s municipal licensing and standards committee have been undertaken and some charges have been laid.

Toronto police officers from 11, 12 and 13 divisions speak at community safety forum hosted by Councillor Cesar Palacio

Police Chief Mark Saunders says Toronto is still a safe place to live

News Nov 25, 2015 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

It was a homecoming of sorts, Toronto police Chief Mark Saunders told the audience at a community safety forum at Joseph J. Piccininni Community Centre Monday, Nov. 23.

Toronto’s top cop joined senior officers from divisions 11, 13, and 12, which Saunders once commanded, for the forum, hosted by Davenport Councillor Cesar Palacio and attended by newly elected Davenport MP Julie Dzerowicz.

Last year at this time, “Chief Bill Blair was in my position now and some of the leaders here were in my position,” he told the dozens of community members.

“Toronto is still the safest urban city in North America to live,” said Saunders, who was appointed chief of police in April. “No matter what the naysayers say, it’s still the city of choice to live in, according to reputable magazines.”

Saunders, who said he “understands the importance of listening to each other,” wanted to devote as much time as possible listening to residents’ issues.

Yet, before the question and answer period, superintendents from each division presented an overall look at what’s been happening crime wise in their and other neighbourhoods.

Looking at the seven major crime indicators – assaults, sexual assaults, robbery, break and enters, auto thefts, theft over $5,000 and murder ­– 13 Division’s Insp. Anil Anand said his division has seen a progressive decline in most categories.

The incidents of break and enters have remained stable, while incidents of car thefts have increased by five per cent.

There has been one murder within 13 Division, which Anand said he wasn’t at liberty to discuss.

“The information we’ve received from you folks (has) made a difference,” Anand said, crediting residents for their vigilance.

Twelve Division’s Insp. Reuben Stroble thanked everyone for attending the safety forum, acknowledging people lead busy lives.

“We’re doing really well in 12 Division. We’re addressing your concerns,” he said. “Every week, we have a divisional crime meeting when we look at the problems in each neighbourhood and decide what we can do to address those issues and develop strategies.”

There have been four homicides within 12 Division this year, one of which happened in Davenport. It was domestic related, Stroble said, and solved that day.

“There is no worry for you as a community,” he said.

There has been as many as 24 shootings in 12 Division, but none in the Davenport area – “your community is doing very well.”

There is an old proverb that says, ‘It takes a village to raise a child.’ Eleven Division Supt. Heinz Kuck cited that phrase pointing out everyone in the community is all part of this “united village.”

“We have to work collectively to keep our children safe,” said Kuck, a father himself. “We have to form partnerships – we’ll do our part, you’ve got to do your part.”

Kuck said 11 Division officers works hard to nurture relationships within its communities. He cited the recent sleep-out on the station’s front lawn, which brought together officers, members of the Community Police Liaison Committee (CPLC) and residents. Its purpose was to experience, vicariously, the hardships of the homeless.

The initiative not only collected more than 3,000 pounds of winter clothing for the homeless, but brought Saunders out in solidarity.

“Low and behold, he was wearing his pajamas – flannel,” Kuck said, garnering laughs from the audience. “Twenty-four hours earlier, he was at the Chief of Police gala.”

There have been two homicides this year so far in 11 Division, Const. Rob Tajti, its crime analyst, said, one of which has been solved. There were three sexual assaults in High Park, which the division responded to with an “all hands on deck” approach.

Plainclothes officers descended upon the park as did foot and bike patrol officers.

“The offender was arrested and is currently awaiting trial,” Tajti said.

Two weeks ago, a fourth bank was robbed in a series – two in 11 and two in 14 divisions. The culprits were apprehended trying to escape in a cab, Tajti said.

Irwin Patterson, a resident and member of the CPLC, told Saunders his concern for the cyclists and pedestrians who don’t obey traffic signals and stop signs.

“We’ve got to educate the people,” he said.

Saunders pointed out that as a pedestrian or cyclist, even though they might have the right of way, doesn’t mean it’s safe. “Every person should check first before proceeding,” he said.

Members of the St. Clair Gardens Business Improvement Area shared concerns about certain bars that are open late, leave doors open and disrupt residents who live nearby.

Palacio said that a number of inspections by both police and the city’s municipal licensing and standards committee have been undertaken and some charges have been laid.