Soon to open Toronto obstacle course will offer playground for adults

News Sep 12, 2015 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

Get ready to run, climb, jump and crawl like the carefree days of your childhood in Parkdale’s soon-to-open playground for grownups – Pursuit Obstacle Course Racing (OCR).

“It’s a place to remind you that playing is an integral part of life,” said Eddie Chan, the co-founder of Pursuit OCR and the owner of Bolt Fresh Bar on Queen Street West.

“I feel like we get so inundated by our work and our stress and all the things we have to deal with and we forget to play. We just want to provide a place where you can learn, get fit and most of all have fun.”

Having fun is one of the main goals of the indoor centre along with socializing. The owners want the users of the space to think of it as reinstating recess.

“We want this place to be a break from their work week...It’s a playground,” said co-founder Wil McLean, who also runs RedGate Body Works as a personal trainer in West Queen West.

“There’s a point at which in our tweens and high school that we don’t get recess anymore and it’s drummed home, unfortunately, that that kind of play is for babies and it’s not cool anymore.

“And you can’t look foolish or silly when you’re working out because now it’s become a serious matter, and that stays with you right into adulthood. We’re trying to break free from that concept.”

The almost 10,000 square-foot indoor obstacle course is located at 444 Dufferin St., just north of Queen Street West, and features a 160-yard obstacle course (roughly the length of a football field and a half) complete with a ring swing and ball pit, a cargo net climb and 14-foot wall cove ramp.

It also has various rest stops throughout the course and an elevated deck gallery space where participants can grab a drink of water, cheer on their friends and instagram a couple of pictures.

The space is not only for adventurists looking to get fit and have fun simultaneously in a unique way with friends or solo, but is also for pro level athletes who participate in obstacle course races, said McLean.

“We’ve also done it in a way that provides serious training for athletes that are looking to do obstacle course racing so they can come in and work hardcore on things that they’re trying to overcome.”

One of the options for obstacle course athletes is a 14-foot cove wall ramp and ascending monkey bars. Participants will also have the option to enter a cryotherapy chamber that drops to -153 degrees Celsius for 90 seconds.

“It’s to help rejuvenate your body and reduce inflammation in joints and can be used for therapy as well,” Chan explained.

The idea for the indoor adult jungle gym is the brainchild of McLean who came up with the idea years ago.

“It actually came from a business plan I had when I was 17 from an entrepreneur class in high school,” McLean told The Villager.

“At the time I developed it as a youth centre and it’s evolved since then.”

The pair, who both live on Queen Street West, took over the space in May despite talks of it possibly being redeveloped by Site Line Group into a mixed use block with one eight storey building and two 12-storey buildings.

“It’s pretty rare to get this volume of space in this area. We were lucky to swoop in and grab it when we did,” said Chan.

“(We know) the building is in flux. So what we’d like to do is have it as a strong proving ground to have it stick around.”

They’re hoping to open up to the Parkdale and West Queen West community by the end of the month. To help make the launch a success the fitness duo also launched an Indiegogo campaign with a goal of $35,000, and so far the Queen West owners have raised almost 40 per cent of their goal with $13,630.

The funds raised will help pay for the purchase of fitness equipment and “accelerate our programming,” McLean said.

“We don’t want to have a rationing of services,” McLean explained, adding he and Chan want to give their customers everything they have to offer right out of the gate because it’s tailored to the neighbourhood needs.

To donate to Pursuit OCR’s Indiegogo campaign, visit https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/pursuit-ocr--2#/story

Soon to open Toronto obstacle course will offer playground for adults

Dufferin Street facility’s obstacle course bigger than football field

News Sep 12, 2015 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

Get ready to run, climb, jump and crawl like the carefree days of your childhood in Parkdale’s soon-to-open playground for grownups – Pursuit Obstacle Course Racing (OCR).

“It’s a place to remind you that playing is an integral part of life,” said Eddie Chan, the co-founder of Pursuit OCR and the owner of Bolt Fresh Bar on Queen Street West.

“I feel like we get so inundated by our work and our stress and all the things we have to deal with and we forget to play. We just want to provide a place where you can learn, get fit and most of all have fun.”

Having fun is one of the main goals of the indoor centre along with socializing. The owners want the users of the space to think of it as reinstating recess.

“We want this place to be a break from their work week...It’s a playground,” said co-founder Wil McLean, who also runs RedGate Body Works as a personal trainer in West Queen West.

“There’s a point at which in our tweens and high school that we don’t get recess anymore and it’s drummed home, unfortunately, that that kind of play is for babies and it’s not cool anymore.

“And you can’t look foolish or silly when you’re working out because now it’s become a serious matter, and that stays with you right into adulthood. We’re trying to break free from that concept.”

The almost 10,000 square-foot indoor obstacle course is located at 444 Dufferin St., just north of Queen Street West, and features a 160-yard obstacle course (roughly the length of a football field and a half) complete with a ring swing and ball pit, a cargo net climb and 14-foot wall cove ramp.

It also has various rest stops throughout the course and an elevated deck gallery space where participants can grab a drink of water, cheer on their friends and instagram a couple of pictures.

The space is not only for adventurists looking to get fit and have fun simultaneously in a unique way with friends or solo, but is also for pro level athletes who participate in obstacle course races, said McLean.

“We’ve also done it in a way that provides serious training for athletes that are looking to do obstacle course racing so they can come in and work hardcore on things that they’re trying to overcome.”

One of the options for obstacle course athletes is a 14-foot cove wall ramp and ascending monkey bars. Participants will also have the option to enter a cryotherapy chamber that drops to -153 degrees Celsius for 90 seconds.

“It’s to help rejuvenate your body and reduce inflammation in joints and can be used for therapy as well,” Chan explained.

The idea for the indoor adult jungle gym is the brainchild of McLean who came up with the idea years ago.

“It actually came from a business plan I had when I was 17 from an entrepreneur class in high school,” McLean told The Villager.

“At the time I developed it as a youth centre and it’s evolved since then.”

The pair, who both live on Queen Street West, took over the space in May despite talks of it possibly being redeveloped by Site Line Group into a mixed use block with one eight storey building and two 12-storey buildings.

“It’s pretty rare to get this volume of space in this area. We were lucky to swoop in and grab it when we did,” said Chan.

“(We know) the building is in flux. So what we’d like to do is have it as a strong proving ground to have it stick around.”

They’re hoping to open up to the Parkdale and West Queen West community by the end of the month. To help make the launch a success the fitness duo also launched an Indiegogo campaign with a goal of $35,000, and so far the Queen West owners have raised almost 40 per cent of their goal with $13,630.

The funds raised will help pay for the purchase of fitness equipment and “accelerate our programming,” McLean said.

“We don’t want to have a rationing of services,” McLean explained, adding he and Chan want to give their customers everything they have to offer right out of the gate because it’s tailored to the neighbourhood needs.

To donate to Pursuit OCR’s Indiegogo campaign, visit https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/pursuit-ocr--2#/story

Soon to open Toronto obstacle course will offer playground for adults

Dufferin Street facility’s obstacle course bigger than football field

News Sep 12, 2015 by Hilary Caton Parkdale Villager

Get ready to run, climb, jump and crawl like the carefree days of your childhood in Parkdale’s soon-to-open playground for grownups – Pursuit Obstacle Course Racing (OCR).

“It’s a place to remind you that playing is an integral part of life,” said Eddie Chan, the co-founder of Pursuit OCR and the owner of Bolt Fresh Bar on Queen Street West.

“I feel like we get so inundated by our work and our stress and all the things we have to deal with and we forget to play. We just want to provide a place where you can learn, get fit and most of all have fun.”

Having fun is one of the main goals of the indoor centre along with socializing. The owners want the users of the space to think of it as reinstating recess.

“We want this place to be a break from their work week...It’s a playground,” said co-founder Wil McLean, who also runs RedGate Body Works as a personal trainer in West Queen West.

“There’s a point at which in our tweens and high school that we don’t get recess anymore and it’s drummed home, unfortunately, that that kind of play is for babies and it’s not cool anymore.

“And you can’t look foolish or silly when you’re working out because now it’s become a serious matter, and that stays with you right into adulthood. We’re trying to break free from that concept.”

The almost 10,000 square-foot indoor obstacle course is located at 444 Dufferin St., just north of Queen Street West, and features a 160-yard obstacle course (roughly the length of a football field and a half) complete with a ring swing and ball pit, a cargo net climb and 14-foot wall cove ramp.

It also has various rest stops throughout the course and an elevated deck gallery space where participants can grab a drink of water, cheer on their friends and instagram a couple of pictures.

The space is not only for adventurists looking to get fit and have fun simultaneously in a unique way with friends or solo, but is also for pro level athletes who participate in obstacle course races, said McLean.

“We’ve also done it in a way that provides serious training for athletes that are looking to do obstacle course racing so they can come in and work hardcore on things that they’re trying to overcome.”

One of the options for obstacle course athletes is a 14-foot cove wall ramp and ascending monkey bars. Participants will also have the option to enter a cryotherapy chamber that drops to -153 degrees Celsius for 90 seconds.

“It’s to help rejuvenate your body and reduce inflammation in joints and can be used for therapy as well,” Chan explained.

The idea for the indoor adult jungle gym is the brainchild of McLean who came up with the idea years ago.

“It actually came from a business plan I had when I was 17 from an entrepreneur class in high school,” McLean told The Villager.

“At the time I developed it as a youth centre and it’s evolved since then.”

The pair, who both live on Queen Street West, took over the space in May despite talks of it possibly being redeveloped by Site Line Group into a mixed use block with one eight storey building and two 12-storey buildings.

“It’s pretty rare to get this volume of space in this area. We were lucky to swoop in and grab it when we did,” said Chan.

“(We know) the building is in flux. So what we’d like to do is have it as a strong proving ground to have it stick around.”

They’re hoping to open up to the Parkdale and West Queen West community by the end of the month. To help make the launch a success the fitness duo also launched an Indiegogo campaign with a goal of $35,000, and so far the Queen West owners have raised almost 40 per cent of their goal with $13,630.

The funds raised will help pay for the purchase of fitness equipment and “accelerate our programming,” McLean said.

“We don’t want to have a rationing of services,” McLean explained, adding he and Chan want to give their customers everything they have to offer right out of the gate because it’s tailored to the neighbourhood needs.

To donate to Pursuit OCR’s Indiegogo campaign, visit https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/pursuit-ocr--2#/story