Toronto marks 400th anniversary of explorer’s epic journey along Humber’s Carrying Place Trail

News Aug 28, 2015 by Sam Juric Bloor West Villager

Toronto’s rich history will be celebrated next month as the city’s neighbourhoods are set to host events to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Étienne Brûlé’s epic journey along the Humber River.

The celebration will take place on Sunday, Sept. 13.

Étienne Brûlé was a French explorer who embarked on a voyage of discovery in 1615 and established what is known today as the historical, Carrying Place Trail.

Author Glenn Turner fondly remembers first encountering Brûlé and Toronto’s beguiling history when he was just a teenager attending North Albion Collegiate, in Rexdale.

“Learning about the history of our community is a way in which we can all connect to the land. Local history allows us to understand why things are the way they are, and, at its best, it can guide our decisions for the future,” Turner said.

The Etobicoke-raised historian recently published a book which follows Brûlé’s grand voyage, The Toronto Carrying Place: Rediscovering Toronto’s Most Ancient Trail.

After eight years of arduous research and writing, the author was proud to celebrate the book’s release this past May.

Often juggling his job as a teaching librarian in Nepean, Ont. and his passion to relay the stories of Canada’s past, Turner was determined to piece together a comprehensive account of the Carrying Place Trail.

In the wake of his achievement, Turner is happy to witness a renewed appreciation for Toronto’s roots.

“The flood of recent books and events relating to Toronto’s early history may well change how we see our city and its place in Canada,” Turner said.

Events will be held across the city to remember Étienne Brûlé and Carrying Place Trail on Sept. 13.

Beginning in the community of Kleinberg, hikers hailing from the Toronto area will take part in the Brûlé -Wendats Expedition in celebration of Brûlé’s discovery by embarking on a journey at 9 a.m.

The band of hikers, including Turner, will make its first stop south of Steeles Avenue at noon.

As the hikers continue their passage along the trail, the community will be invited to Cruickshank Park and Weston Lions Park for a family picnic where they can offer support by meeting the hikers as they arrive between noon and 1 p.m.

The hikers will be met by children of the community who will carry individually decorated paddles which were made at the Paddles Ahoy! event at Weston library.

The Weston Historical Society is slated to orally share the story of the 23-year-old explorer and his adventures as well as other local history and lore throughout the event.

Barbara Spyropoulos, member of Community Police Liaison Committee of 12 Division was honoured to celebrate Toronto’s multicultural identity by organizing the 12 Division’s celebration of the Carrying Place Trail.

“It’s a way of highlighting the fact that we have so many immigrants in our community- Brûlé was nominally the first,” Spyropoulos said.

An immigrant herself, Spyropoulos has called Weston home for many years.

“We all have a part to play in Canada’s development regardless of our country of origin,” Spyropoulos said.

As the hikers commence the last leg of their re-enactment of Brûlé’s journey along the Humber River, the community is encouraged to meet them at their final destination; the Swansea 8,000 Years Celebration at Lucy Maud Montgomery Park, 222 Riverside Dr. An exact time for this event will be announced online at www.swansea8000years.com

The community will be transported through time as storytellers, Aqua Rennie, Hildy Stollery, Pat Bisset, and Edith George, relate stories of First Nations history and characters in period costumes from 25 eras who will bring some historical flair to the festivities.

“This is a great opportunity to highlight and celebrate the history and culture of our First Nations,” Spyropoulos said.

Children will have the chance take part in the historical fun and join in a mock archaeological dig.

Information booths at the Riverside Drive festival will include early French cooking with Chantal Vechambre, information sessions with Brule historians, and the Ontario Museum Association.

For Turner, learning about Canada and Toronto’s formative, historical moments has the power to create change within Canada.

“Toronto’s origins are Aboriginal and French rather than English. The city is a part of all of those worlds. I believe public attitudes and policy will evolve as we learn more and more about our Aboriginal and French-Canadian heritage,” Turner said.

***

GRAVES SIMCOE JOURNEY

Join Lt.-Gov. John Graves Simcoe, in re-enacting the first day of his 1793 journey up the Toronto Carrying Place as part of a Humber Heritage Committee Historical Walk, Saturday, Sept. 19.

The walk is assembling at 9 a.m. and departing at 9:30 a.m. from the parking area south of 8 South Kingsway (The Rousseaux Site – Petro-Canada) by the Humber River. It ends at the governor’s 1793 camp site at Eglinton Avenue and the Humber River. Bob Roden is the governor and historical commentary will be by guide Madeleine McDowell.

Call 416-767-7633 for details. Admission is free.

SPEAKER’S NIGHT

The Etobicoke Historical Society (EHS) hosts a speaker’s night From the Humber to the Susquehanna: Étienne Brûlé’s historic journey of 1615 on Sept. 24 at Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas St. W. at 7 p.m. EHS director and event organizer Hugh Barnett will lead a discussion on some of the myths and facts surrounding Brûlé’s epic journey. Call 416-394-8113 for details.

CARRYING PLACE CONFERENCE

EHS and other regional historical societies host The Toronto Carrying Place: A Shared Legacy at Old Mill Toronto, 21 Old Mill Rd., Saturday, Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hear academics, authors, and local historians present on and discuss such diverse topics as the Tkaronto or Humber Portage, the Iroquoian and Algonquian origins of the Toronto region, as well as First Nations’ encounters with Étienne Brûlé, Samuel de Champlain, and other Franco-European explorers and traders in 17th century Ontario. Tickets are free but must be reserved by Sept. 4. Visit www.bit.ly/1JPk5CN or go to www.etobicokehistorical.com for more.

Toronto marks 400th anniversary of explorer’s epic journey along Humber’s Carrying Place Trail

Étienne Brûlé’s epic journey along the Humber River will be marked on Sunday, Sept. 13.

News Aug 28, 2015 by Sam Juric Bloor West Villager

Toronto’s rich history will be celebrated next month as the city’s neighbourhoods are set to host events to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Étienne Brûlé’s epic journey along the Humber River.

The celebration will take place on Sunday, Sept. 13.

Étienne Brûlé was a French explorer who embarked on a voyage of discovery in 1615 and established what is known today as the historical, Carrying Place Trail.

Author Glenn Turner fondly remembers first encountering Brûlé and Toronto’s beguiling history when he was just a teenager attending North Albion Collegiate, in Rexdale.

“Learning about the history of our community is a way in which we can all connect to the land. Local history allows us to understand why things are the way they are, and, at its best, it can guide our decisions for the future,” Turner said.

The Etobicoke-raised historian recently published a book which follows Brûlé’s grand voyage, The Toronto Carrying Place: Rediscovering Toronto’s Most Ancient Trail.

After eight years of arduous research and writing, the author was proud to celebrate the book’s release this past May.

Often juggling his job as a teaching librarian in Nepean, Ont. and his passion to relay the stories of Canada’s past, Turner was determined to piece together a comprehensive account of the Carrying Place Trail.

In the wake of his achievement, Turner is happy to witness a renewed appreciation for Toronto’s roots.

“The flood of recent books and events relating to Toronto’s early history may well change how we see our city and its place in Canada,” Turner said.

Events will be held across the city to remember Étienne Brûlé and Carrying Place Trail on Sept. 13.

Beginning in the community of Kleinberg, hikers hailing from the Toronto area will take part in the Brûlé -Wendats Expedition in celebration of Brûlé’s discovery by embarking on a journey at 9 a.m.

The band of hikers, including Turner, will make its first stop south of Steeles Avenue at noon.

As the hikers continue their passage along the trail, the community will be invited to Cruickshank Park and Weston Lions Park for a family picnic where they can offer support by meeting the hikers as they arrive between noon and 1 p.m.

The hikers will be met by children of the community who will carry individually decorated paddles which were made at the Paddles Ahoy! event at Weston library.

The Weston Historical Society is slated to orally share the story of the 23-year-old explorer and his adventures as well as other local history and lore throughout the event.

Barbara Spyropoulos, member of Community Police Liaison Committee of 12 Division was honoured to celebrate Toronto’s multicultural identity by organizing the 12 Division’s celebration of the Carrying Place Trail.

“It’s a way of highlighting the fact that we have so many immigrants in our community- Brûlé was nominally the first,” Spyropoulos said.

An immigrant herself, Spyropoulos has called Weston home for many years.

“We all have a part to play in Canada’s development regardless of our country of origin,” Spyropoulos said.

As the hikers commence the last leg of their re-enactment of Brûlé’s journey along the Humber River, the community is encouraged to meet them at their final destination; the Swansea 8,000 Years Celebration at Lucy Maud Montgomery Park, 222 Riverside Dr. An exact time for this event will be announced online at www.swansea8000years.com

The community will be transported through time as storytellers, Aqua Rennie, Hildy Stollery, Pat Bisset, and Edith George, relate stories of First Nations history and characters in period costumes from 25 eras who will bring some historical flair to the festivities.

“This is a great opportunity to highlight and celebrate the history and culture of our First Nations,” Spyropoulos said.

Children will have the chance take part in the historical fun and join in a mock archaeological dig.

Information booths at the Riverside Drive festival will include early French cooking with Chantal Vechambre, information sessions with Brule historians, and the Ontario Museum Association.

For Turner, learning about Canada and Toronto’s formative, historical moments has the power to create change within Canada.

“Toronto’s origins are Aboriginal and French rather than English. The city is a part of all of those worlds. I believe public attitudes and policy will evolve as we learn more and more about our Aboriginal and French-Canadian heritage,” Turner said.

***

GRAVES SIMCOE JOURNEY

Join Lt.-Gov. John Graves Simcoe, in re-enacting the first day of his 1793 journey up the Toronto Carrying Place as part of a Humber Heritage Committee Historical Walk, Saturday, Sept. 19.

The walk is assembling at 9 a.m. and departing at 9:30 a.m. from the parking area south of 8 South Kingsway (The Rousseaux Site – Petro-Canada) by the Humber River. It ends at the governor’s 1793 camp site at Eglinton Avenue and the Humber River. Bob Roden is the governor and historical commentary will be by guide Madeleine McDowell.

Call 416-767-7633 for details. Admission is free.

SPEAKER’S NIGHT

The Etobicoke Historical Society (EHS) hosts a speaker’s night From the Humber to the Susquehanna: Étienne Brûlé’s historic journey of 1615 on Sept. 24 at Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas St. W. at 7 p.m. EHS director and event organizer Hugh Barnett will lead a discussion on some of the myths and facts surrounding Brûlé’s epic journey. Call 416-394-8113 for details.

CARRYING PLACE CONFERENCE

EHS and other regional historical societies host The Toronto Carrying Place: A Shared Legacy at Old Mill Toronto, 21 Old Mill Rd., Saturday, Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hear academics, authors, and local historians present on and discuss such diverse topics as the Tkaronto or Humber Portage, the Iroquoian and Algonquian origins of the Toronto region, as well as First Nations’ encounters with Étienne Brûlé, Samuel de Champlain, and other Franco-European explorers and traders in 17th century Ontario. Tickets are free but must be reserved by Sept. 4. Visit www.bit.ly/1JPk5CN or go to www.etobicokehistorical.com for more.

Toronto marks 400th anniversary of explorer’s epic journey along Humber’s Carrying Place Trail

Étienne Brûlé’s epic journey along the Humber River will be marked on Sunday, Sept. 13.

News Aug 28, 2015 by Sam Juric Bloor West Villager

Toronto’s rich history will be celebrated next month as the city’s neighbourhoods are set to host events to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Étienne Brûlé’s epic journey along the Humber River.

The celebration will take place on Sunday, Sept. 13.

Étienne Brûlé was a French explorer who embarked on a voyage of discovery in 1615 and established what is known today as the historical, Carrying Place Trail.

Author Glenn Turner fondly remembers first encountering Brûlé and Toronto’s beguiling history when he was just a teenager attending North Albion Collegiate, in Rexdale.

“Learning about the history of our community is a way in which we can all connect to the land. Local history allows us to understand why things are the way they are, and, at its best, it can guide our decisions for the future,” Turner said.

The Etobicoke-raised historian recently published a book which follows Brûlé’s grand voyage, The Toronto Carrying Place: Rediscovering Toronto’s Most Ancient Trail.

After eight years of arduous research and writing, the author was proud to celebrate the book’s release this past May.

Often juggling his job as a teaching librarian in Nepean, Ont. and his passion to relay the stories of Canada’s past, Turner was determined to piece together a comprehensive account of the Carrying Place Trail.

In the wake of his achievement, Turner is happy to witness a renewed appreciation for Toronto’s roots.

“The flood of recent books and events relating to Toronto’s early history may well change how we see our city and its place in Canada,” Turner said.

Events will be held across the city to remember Étienne Brûlé and Carrying Place Trail on Sept. 13.

Beginning in the community of Kleinberg, hikers hailing from the Toronto area will take part in the Brûlé -Wendats Expedition in celebration of Brûlé’s discovery by embarking on a journey at 9 a.m.

The band of hikers, including Turner, will make its first stop south of Steeles Avenue at noon.

As the hikers continue their passage along the trail, the community will be invited to Cruickshank Park and Weston Lions Park for a family picnic where they can offer support by meeting the hikers as they arrive between noon and 1 p.m.

The hikers will be met by children of the community who will carry individually decorated paddles which were made at the Paddles Ahoy! event at Weston library.

The Weston Historical Society is slated to orally share the story of the 23-year-old explorer and his adventures as well as other local history and lore throughout the event.

Barbara Spyropoulos, member of Community Police Liaison Committee of 12 Division was honoured to celebrate Toronto’s multicultural identity by organizing the 12 Division’s celebration of the Carrying Place Trail.

“It’s a way of highlighting the fact that we have so many immigrants in our community- Brûlé was nominally the first,” Spyropoulos said.

An immigrant herself, Spyropoulos has called Weston home for many years.

“We all have a part to play in Canada’s development regardless of our country of origin,” Spyropoulos said.

As the hikers commence the last leg of their re-enactment of Brûlé’s journey along the Humber River, the community is encouraged to meet them at their final destination; the Swansea 8,000 Years Celebration at Lucy Maud Montgomery Park, 222 Riverside Dr. An exact time for this event will be announced online at www.swansea8000years.com

The community will be transported through time as storytellers, Aqua Rennie, Hildy Stollery, Pat Bisset, and Edith George, relate stories of First Nations history and characters in period costumes from 25 eras who will bring some historical flair to the festivities.

“This is a great opportunity to highlight and celebrate the history and culture of our First Nations,” Spyropoulos said.

Children will have the chance take part in the historical fun and join in a mock archaeological dig.

Information booths at the Riverside Drive festival will include early French cooking with Chantal Vechambre, information sessions with Brule historians, and the Ontario Museum Association.

For Turner, learning about Canada and Toronto’s formative, historical moments has the power to create change within Canada.

“Toronto’s origins are Aboriginal and French rather than English. The city is a part of all of those worlds. I believe public attitudes and policy will evolve as we learn more and more about our Aboriginal and French-Canadian heritage,” Turner said.

***

GRAVES SIMCOE JOURNEY

Join Lt.-Gov. John Graves Simcoe, in re-enacting the first day of his 1793 journey up the Toronto Carrying Place as part of a Humber Heritage Committee Historical Walk, Saturday, Sept. 19.

The walk is assembling at 9 a.m. and departing at 9:30 a.m. from the parking area south of 8 South Kingsway (The Rousseaux Site – Petro-Canada) by the Humber River. It ends at the governor’s 1793 camp site at Eglinton Avenue and the Humber River. Bob Roden is the governor and historical commentary will be by guide Madeleine McDowell.

Call 416-767-7633 for details. Admission is free.

SPEAKER’S NIGHT

The Etobicoke Historical Society (EHS) hosts a speaker’s night From the Humber to the Susquehanna: Étienne Brûlé’s historic journey of 1615 on Sept. 24 at Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas St. W. at 7 p.m. EHS director and event organizer Hugh Barnett will lead a discussion on some of the myths and facts surrounding Brûlé’s epic journey. Call 416-394-8113 for details.

CARRYING PLACE CONFERENCE

EHS and other regional historical societies host The Toronto Carrying Place: A Shared Legacy at Old Mill Toronto, 21 Old Mill Rd., Saturday, Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hear academics, authors, and local historians present on and discuss such diverse topics as the Tkaronto or Humber Portage, the Iroquoian and Algonquian origins of the Toronto region, as well as First Nations’ encounters with Étienne Brûlé, Samuel de Champlain, and other Franco-European explorers and traders in 17th century Ontario. Tickets are free but must be reserved by Sept. 4. Visit www.bit.ly/1JPk5CN or go to www.etobicokehistorical.com for more.