South Etobicoke youth question federal election candidates

News Aug 20, 2015 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Post-secondary education affordability, sustainable summer employment and reducing carbon gas emissions are south Etobicoke youth’s top-of-mind federal election issues.

Etobicoke-Lakeshore candidates campaigned Wednesday night at LAMP Community Health Centre at an all-candidates’ debate organized by SEYA, South Etobicoke Youth Assembly.

SEYA is a youth-led, youth-run group working to actively engage community youth through workshops on leadership, skills development, teamwork and youth issues to grades 10 and 11 students, and at LAMP Wednesday nights. Its vision: to provide youth ongoing opportunities for advocacy, civic engagement and volunteer hours.

Approximately 30 youth attended the all-candidates’ meeting, most 14 or 15 years old, in a crowd of about 50 residents.

“I came to learn about their positions,” said Varun Aggarwal, 14, a SEYA member entering Grade 9 next month at Lakeshore Collegiate Institute (LCI).

“I want to know if young people want to go to college, come from another country, but can’t afford it, what can they do to help?”

Incumbent Conservative candidate Bernard Trottier, 50, an area resident and a former senior consulting manager with IBM, said the Conservative government has invested $10 billion in research, and in a Canada Savings Loan program to help Canadian youth afford the ever-increasing cost of college and university.

Making Canada attractive to investors, he said, boosts economic growth, and creates jobs.

“We need to make Canada the most attractive place in the world to invest. That’s ultimately how you create jobs and opportunities for young people,” Trottier said. “Training is also important; working with industry to learn their needs.”

Liberal candidate James Maloney, 51, a civil trial lawyer and partner at Hughes Amys LLP, charged the Harper Conservative government has “slashed” student summer jobs’ programs, and jobs, during its nine years in office.

Maloney said the opportunity for Canadian youth to pursue college or university is “not just an issue of funding. It’s an issue of fairness.”

“It’s about lowering taxes on people in the middle class so they can send their kids to university. It’s not about lowering taxes on people who make the most,” said the 40-year local resident, taking a shot at the Conservatives.

NDP candidate Phil Trotter, a lawyer and mediator, said his party is committed to increasing student education grants, and tuition reduction.

The federal NDP platform commits to increase the Canada Student Grants Program by $200 million a year, targeting accessibility for Aboriginal, disabled and low-income students. The NDP also propose to designate an $800 million transfer to provinces and territories to lower tuition fees.

“In the Netherlands, they look at the needs of the market to make sure schools and training programs match the economy and so students become entrepreneurs not just employees,” Trotter said.

The Green party addresses student debt through one year of paid employment experience, as well as a $4,000 apprentice tuition credit, said Green candidate Angela Salewsky, a business development manager in the security industry, and member of the Lakeshore Planning Council who has lived in the riding since 1997.

Salewsky ran for the Green party in the 2011 and 2014 Ontario elections, and in the lakeside riding’s 2013 byelection.

Janice Murray, a bindery machine operator, has been the Marxist-Leninist party’s local candidate for more than a decade. She has lived in the riding since 1977.

She is a founding member of the Women’s Association of Etobicoke, and the Lakeshore Women’s Action Group.

“Education is a right,” said Murray, adding governments must increase post-secondary education funding.

Bassel Wehbe, 14, will attend LCI this September. He wants to be a surgeon.

“I wanted to be around important people and do something productive with my summer,” Wehbe said. “I’m enjoying listening to them. I’m interested in affordable tuition for university and medical school.”

Pema Rabgha, 19, a LCI graduate, will attend George Brown College this fall to become a computer systems technician.

“I found it very informative. I really enjoyed it. They tried to make it youth-focused,” said Rabgha. a four-year SEYA member who greeted candidates and residents at the door.

He pointed to SEYA youth who swiftly approached candidates with questions after the meeting. At least six youth had their hands up with questions when the meeting ended.

“The youth are engaged. The SEYA youth are talking with the candidates,” Rabgha said. “It has been eye opening. Youth now know what each party stands for.”

SEYA director Janice Karmody, 21, said SEYA’s filming last year of recent high school graduates’ views on democracy sparked early interest in the current federal election campaign.

“Politicians only focus on a certain demographic. They don’t focus on youth,” Michelle said in the video.

“Politicians aren’t trying to get involved with youth. And youth aren’t trying to engage politicians,” Jeffrey commented in the video.

“I’ve always known about low youth voter turnout, but it was eye opening when we filmed the democracy video,” said Karmody, a lifelong area resident with SEYA for seven years. She is studying communications and justice services at Humber College.

“The youth who have been with SEYA a few years have a growing interest in politics. When we have these all-candidates’ meetings every election, more and more youth show interest. Most of the youth here are 14-year-olds.”

Visit SEYA LAMP on Twitter @SEYALAMP and on Facebook

South Etobicoke youth question federal election candidates

Post-secondary education costs, summer jobs concern youth at Etobicoke-Lakeshore event

News Aug 20, 2015 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Post-secondary education affordability, sustainable summer employment and reducing carbon gas emissions are south Etobicoke youth’s top-of-mind federal election issues.

Etobicoke-Lakeshore candidates campaigned Wednesday night at LAMP Community Health Centre at an all-candidates’ debate organized by SEYA, South Etobicoke Youth Assembly.

SEYA is a youth-led, youth-run group working to actively engage community youth through workshops on leadership, skills development, teamwork and youth issues to grades 10 and 11 students, and at LAMP Wednesday nights. Its vision: to provide youth ongoing opportunities for advocacy, civic engagement and volunteer hours.

Approximately 30 youth attended the all-candidates’ meeting, most 14 or 15 years old, in a crowd of about 50 residents.

“I came to learn about their positions,” said Varun Aggarwal, 14, a SEYA member entering Grade 9 next month at Lakeshore Collegiate Institute (LCI).

“I want to know if young people want to go to college, come from another country, but can’t afford it, what can they do to help?”

Incumbent Conservative candidate Bernard Trottier, 50, an area resident and a former senior consulting manager with IBM, said the Conservative government has invested $10 billion in research, and in a Canada Savings Loan program to help Canadian youth afford the ever-increasing cost of college and university.

Making Canada attractive to investors, he said, boosts economic growth, and creates jobs.

“We need to make Canada the most attractive place in the world to invest. That’s ultimately how you create jobs and opportunities for young people,” Trottier said. “Training is also important; working with industry to learn their needs.”

Liberal candidate James Maloney, 51, a civil trial lawyer and partner at Hughes Amys LLP, charged the Harper Conservative government has “slashed” student summer jobs’ programs, and jobs, during its nine years in office.

Maloney said the opportunity for Canadian youth to pursue college or university is “not just an issue of funding. It’s an issue of fairness.”

“It’s about lowering taxes on people in the middle class so they can send their kids to university. It’s not about lowering taxes on people who make the most,” said the 40-year local resident, taking a shot at the Conservatives.

NDP candidate Phil Trotter, a lawyer and mediator, said his party is committed to increasing student education grants, and tuition reduction.

The federal NDP platform commits to increase the Canada Student Grants Program by $200 million a year, targeting accessibility for Aboriginal, disabled and low-income students. The NDP also propose to designate an $800 million transfer to provinces and territories to lower tuition fees.

“In the Netherlands, they look at the needs of the market to make sure schools and training programs match the economy and so students become entrepreneurs not just employees,” Trotter said.

The Green party addresses student debt through one year of paid employment experience, as well as a $4,000 apprentice tuition credit, said Green candidate Angela Salewsky, a business development manager in the security industry, and member of the Lakeshore Planning Council who has lived in the riding since 1997.

Salewsky ran for the Green party in the 2011 and 2014 Ontario elections, and in the lakeside riding’s 2013 byelection.

Janice Murray, a bindery machine operator, has been the Marxist-Leninist party’s local candidate for more than a decade. She has lived in the riding since 1977.

She is a founding member of the Women’s Association of Etobicoke, and the Lakeshore Women’s Action Group.

“Education is a right,” said Murray, adding governments must increase post-secondary education funding.

Bassel Wehbe, 14, will attend LCI this September. He wants to be a surgeon.

“I wanted to be around important people and do something productive with my summer,” Wehbe said. “I’m enjoying listening to them. I’m interested in affordable tuition for university and medical school.”

Pema Rabgha, 19, a LCI graduate, will attend George Brown College this fall to become a computer systems technician.

“I found it very informative. I really enjoyed it. They tried to make it youth-focused,” said Rabgha. a four-year SEYA member who greeted candidates and residents at the door.

He pointed to SEYA youth who swiftly approached candidates with questions after the meeting. At least six youth had their hands up with questions when the meeting ended.

“The youth are engaged. The SEYA youth are talking with the candidates,” Rabgha said. “It has been eye opening. Youth now know what each party stands for.”

SEYA director Janice Karmody, 21, said SEYA’s filming last year of recent high school graduates’ views on democracy sparked early interest in the current federal election campaign.

“Politicians only focus on a certain demographic. They don’t focus on youth,” Michelle said in the video.

“Politicians aren’t trying to get involved with youth. And youth aren’t trying to engage politicians,” Jeffrey commented in the video.

“I’ve always known about low youth voter turnout, but it was eye opening when we filmed the democracy video,” said Karmody, a lifelong area resident with SEYA for seven years. She is studying communications and justice services at Humber College.

“The youth who have been with SEYA a few years have a growing interest in politics. When we have these all-candidates’ meetings every election, more and more youth show interest. Most of the youth here are 14-year-olds.”

Visit SEYA LAMP on Twitter @SEYALAMP and on Facebook

South Etobicoke youth question federal election candidates

Post-secondary education costs, summer jobs concern youth at Etobicoke-Lakeshore event

News Aug 20, 2015 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Post-secondary education affordability, sustainable summer employment and reducing carbon gas emissions are south Etobicoke youth’s top-of-mind federal election issues.

Etobicoke-Lakeshore candidates campaigned Wednesday night at LAMP Community Health Centre at an all-candidates’ debate organized by SEYA, South Etobicoke Youth Assembly.

SEYA is a youth-led, youth-run group working to actively engage community youth through workshops on leadership, skills development, teamwork and youth issues to grades 10 and 11 students, and at LAMP Wednesday nights. Its vision: to provide youth ongoing opportunities for advocacy, civic engagement and volunteer hours.

Approximately 30 youth attended the all-candidates’ meeting, most 14 or 15 years old, in a crowd of about 50 residents.

“I came to learn about their positions,” said Varun Aggarwal, 14, a SEYA member entering Grade 9 next month at Lakeshore Collegiate Institute (LCI).

“I want to know if young people want to go to college, come from another country, but can’t afford it, what can they do to help?”

Incumbent Conservative candidate Bernard Trottier, 50, an area resident and a former senior consulting manager with IBM, said the Conservative government has invested $10 billion in research, and in a Canada Savings Loan program to help Canadian youth afford the ever-increasing cost of college and university.

Making Canada attractive to investors, he said, boosts economic growth, and creates jobs.

“We need to make Canada the most attractive place in the world to invest. That’s ultimately how you create jobs and opportunities for young people,” Trottier said. “Training is also important; working with industry to learn their needs.”

Liberal candidate James Maloney, 51, a civil trial lawyer and partner at Hughes Amys LLP, charged the Harper Conservative government has “slashed” student summer jobs’ programs, and jobs, during its nine years in office.

Maloney said the opportunity for Canadian youth to pursue college or university is “not just an issue of funding. It’s an issue of fairness.”

“It’s about lowering taxes on people in the middle class so they can send their kids to university. It’s not about lowering taxes on people who make the most,” said the 40-year local resident, taking a shot at the Conservatives.

NDP candidate Phil Trotter, a lawyer and mediator, said his party is committed to increasing student education grants, and tuition reduction.

The federal NDP platform commits to increase the Canada Student Grants Program by $200 million a year, targeting accessibility for Aboriginal, disabled and low-income students. The NDP also propose to designate an $800 million transfer to provinces and territories to lower tuition fees.

“In the Netherlands, they look at the needs of the market to make sure schools and training programs match the economy and so students become entrepreneurs not just employees,” Trotter said.

The Green party addresses student debt through one year of paid employment experience, as well as a $4,000 apprentice tuition credit, said Green candidate Angela Salewsky, a business development manager in the security industry, and member of the Lakeshore Planning Council who has lived in the riding since 1997.

Salewsky ran for the Green party in the 2011 and 2014 Ontario elections, and in the lakeside riding’s 2013 byelection.

Janice Murray, a bindery machine operator, has been the Marxist-Leninist party’s local candidate for more than a decade. She has lived in the riding since 1977.

She is a founding member of the Women’s Association of Etobicoke, and the Lakeshore Women’s Action Group.

“Education is a right,” said Murray, adding governments must increase post-secondary education funding.

Bassel Wehbe, 14, will attend LCI this September. He wants to be a surgeon.

“I wanted to be around important people and do something productive with my summer,” Wehbe said. “I’m enjoying listening to them. I’m interested in affordable tuition for university and medical school.”

Pema Rabgha, 19, a LCI graduate, will attend George Brown College this fall to become a computer systems technician.

“I found it very informative. I really enjoyed it. They tried to make it youth-focused,” said Rabgha. a four-year SEYA member who greeted candidates and residents at the door.

He pointed to SEYA youth who swiftly approached candidates with questions after the meeting. At least six youth had their hands up with questions when the meeting ended.

“The youth are engaged. The SEYA youth are talking with the candidates,” Rabgha said. “It has been eye opening. Youth now know what each party stands for.”

SEYA director Janice Karmody, 21, said SEYA’s filming last year of recent high school graduates’ views on democracy sparked early interest in the current federal election campaign.

“Politicians only focus on a certain demographic. They don’t focus on youth,” Michelle said in the video.

“Politicians aren’t trying to get involved with youth. And youth aren’t trying to engage politicians,” Jeffrey commented in the video.

“I’ve always known about low youth voter turnout, but it was eye opening when we filmed the democracy video,” said Karmody, a lifelong area resident with SEYA for seven years. She is studying communications and justice services at Humber College.

“The youth who have been with SEYA a few years have a growing interest in politics. When we have these all-candidates’ meetings every election, more and more youth show interest. Most of the youth here are 14-year-olds.”

Visit SEYA LAMP on Twitter @SEYALAMP and on Facebook