Speed humps sought on Antrim Crescent

News Jun 30, 2015 Scarborough Mirror

They’re determined to get traffic through their neighbourhood to slow down.

Dorset Park’s volunteer safety ambassadors think they know what needs to be done to keep local children safe, even if Scarborough politicians don’t like it.

They want speed humps installed on Antrim Crescent.

“For us, it’s the only way. Now, it’s up to the city to decide,” Lamyaa Hassan, one member of the group, said last month.

Scarborough councillors in the past have shown they don’t like speed humps, which are built on residential roads to slow traffic down.

Three years ago, Scarborough’s community council sided with residents and voted to have speed humps removed from Oakridge Drive, between Brimley and McCowan roads. Several councillors said the humps “don’t work” or just didn’t belong in Scarborough.

But the ambassadors, who live near Antrim, have noticed traffic, in order to avoid congestion on Kennedy Road, comes through the street and Dundalk Drive to get to Ellesmere Road.

Some people drive through at high speed, added Ghada Al Kalaq, who said her son plays in Glamorgan Park and was almost hit crossing Antrim.

She and other volunteers stood outside apartment buildings on the street for a couple of hours each day to get the signatures they needed for a petition.

“It’s so important for this street. Many kids live in this area,” she said.

On April 1, the group delivered to the petition to the city hall office of their local councillor, Norm Kelly. Members were told a traffic study on the humps could take up to two years, Hassan said.

The group is undaunted, however. It wrote letter to city to fix a shed and broken picnic tables in Glamorgan Park, which the city did.

The city also added big rocks at the playground which people can sit on and watch their children.

Now, people with safety issues go to the group, which meets each month at the Dorset Park Community Hub, for help.

Members encourage local people to put working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in their homes. When they see a street light that needs to be fixed, they point that out, said Hazel Wilson, another member.

“We take it seriously, and we’d like to see our neighbourhood safe for everyone,” she said. “It is time-consuming but we enjoy it.”

Speed humps sought on Antrim Crescent

News Jun 30, 2015 Scarborough Mirror

They’re determined to get traffic through their neighbourhood to slow down.

Dorset Park’s volunteer safety ambassadors think they know what needs to be done to keep local children safe, even if Scarborough politicians don’t like it.

They want speed humps installed on Antrim Crescent.

“For us, it’s the only way. Now, it’s up to the city to decide,” Lamyaa Hassan, one member of the group, said last month.

Scarborough councillors in the past have shown they don’t like speed humps, which are built on residential roads to slow traffic down.

Three years ago, Scarborough’s community council sided with residents and voted to have speed humps removed from Oakridge Drive, between Brimley and McCowan roads. Several councillors said the humps “don’t work” or just didn’t belong in Scarborough.

But the ambassadors, who live near Antrim, have noticed traffic, in order to avoid congestion on Kennedy Road, comes through the street and Dundalk Drive to get to Ellesmere Road.

Some people drive through at high speed, added Ghada Al Kalaq, who said her son plays in Glamorgan Park and was almost hit crossing Antrim.

She and other volunteers stood outside apartment buildings on the street for a couple of hours each day to get the signatures they needed for a petition.

“It’s so important for this street. Many kids live in this area,” she said.

On April 1, the group delivered to the petition to the city hall office of their local councillor, Norm Kelly. Members were told a traffic study on the humps could take up to two years, Hassan said.

The group is undaunted, however. It wrote letter to city to fix a shed and broken picnic tables in Glamorgan Park, which the city did.

The city also added big rocks at the playground which people can sit on and watch their children.

Now, people with safety issues go to the group, which meets each month at the Dorset Park Community Hub, for help.

Members encourage local people to put working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in their homes. When they see a street light that needs to be fixed, they point that out, said Hazel Wilson, another member.

“We take it seriously, and we’d like to see our neighbourhood safe for everyone,” she said. “It is time-consuming but we enjoy it.”

Speed humps sought on Antrim Crescent

News Jun 30, 2015 Scarborough Mirror

They’re determined to get traffic through their neighbourhood to slow down.

Dorset Park’s volunteer safety ambassadors think they know what needs to be done to keep local children safe, even if Scarborough politicians don’t like it.

They want speed humps installed on Antrim Crescent.

“For us, it’s the only way. Now, it’s up to the city to decide,” Lamyaa Hassan, one member of the group, said last month.

Scarborough councillors in the past have shown they don’t like speed humps, which are built on residential roads to slow traffic down.

Three years ago, Scarborough’s community council sided with residents and voted to have speed humps removed from Oakridge Drive, between Brimley and McCowan roads. Several councillors said the humps “don’t work” or just didn’t belong in Scarborough.

But the ambassadors, who live near Antrim, have noticed traffic, in order to avoid congestion on Kennedy Road, comes through the street and Dundalk Drive to get to Ellesmere Road.

Some people drive through at high speed, added Ghada Al Kalaq, who said her son plays in Glamorgan Park and was almost hit crossing Antrim.

She and other volunteers stood outside apartment buildings on the street for a couple of hours each day to get the signatures they needed for a petition.

“It’s so important for this street. Many kids live in this area,” she said.

On April 1, the group delivered to the petition to the city hall office of their local councillor, Norm Kelly. Members were told a traffic study on the humps could take up to two years, Hassan said.

The group is undaunted, however. It wrote letter to city to fix a shed and broken picnic tables in Glamorgan Park, which the city did.

The city also added big rocks at the playground which people can sit on and watch their children.

Now, people with safety issues go to the group, which meets each month at the Dorset Park Community Hub, for help.

Members encourage local people to put working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in their homes. When they see a street light that needs to be fixed, they point that out, said Hazel Wilson, another member.

“We take it seriously, and we’d like to see our neighbourhood safe for everyone,” she said. “It is time-consuming but we enjoy it.”