Film Fatherhood takes award at Scarborough Worldwide Film Festival

News Jun 15, 2015 by Sam Juric Scarborough Mirror

The reel of award winners for the Scarborough Worldwide Film Festival has been announced.

The festival screened 15 international films from 10 countries spanning five continents. The festival was also a juried competition.

Although the festival showcased international talent in the world of film everything was coming up Toronto. The documentary film Fatherhood, directed by Scarborough’s Alicia Harris, won for Best Short Film.

The Trip, directed by Grace Wang who grew up in Parkdale, won the Audience Choice Award for Best Short Film.

The jury committee included Arshad Khan, director of Mosaic International South Asian Film Festival; Michael Barry, content development and operations at Cineplex Entertainment; Sara Saljoughi, assistant Pprofessor of English and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto; and Scarborough native Steven Hoffner, an award winning director.

The 22-year-old Harris’ Fatherhood had already been screened at the Canada International Film Festival earlier this year where the film won the Royal Reel Award.

The documentary paints the portrait of a young father and examines the role childhood plays in a man’s ability to parent, said Harris.

The Trip centres on the relationship between a mother and daughter during a transformative road trip to Tobermory, ON.

“The idea for the film was triggered by my own experience with my mother on a similar trip. I wanted to study two people and how they come to a better understanding of themselves and of each other,” said Wang.

The short film was originally pitched at the Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival during its So You Think You Can Pitch event.

An award winning film maker at 32 years-old, Wang was not always so sure of her passion for film making. Before she fell in love with film, Wang was a pre-med student until she became interested in law.

She graduated from law school and worked as a representative for refugees who face deportation. After deciding that law was not the career for her, she wanted to do something that would combine her love for diversity, film and writing.

“I never felt more grounded or more connected to myself than when I was making my first film. That’s how I knew this was what I wanted to do,” Wang said.

The Trip was filmed, acted and made completely by women of colour, she said.

“I think that in itself is a statement and it should be celebrated,” said Wang.

Wang was 11-years-old when she arrived on Canadian soil and her struggles as a woman and an immigrant inform the stories she tells through film.

“There are certain things I want to say in the world and diversity is a part of humanity that is underrepresented,” said Wang.

Film Fatherhood takes award at Scarborough Worldwide Film Festival

Grace Wang’s The Trip wins Audience Choice Award

News Jun 15, 2015 by Sam Juric Scarborough Mirror

The reel of award winners for the Scarborough Worldwide Film Festival has been announced.

The festival screened 15 international films from 10 countries spanning five continents. The festival was also a juried competition.

Although the festival showcased international talent in the world of film everything was coming up Toronto. The documentary film Fatherhood, directed by Scarborough’s Alicia Harris, won for Best Short Film.

The Trip, directed by Grace Wang who grew up in Parkdale, won the Audience Choice Award for Best Short Film.

The jury committee included Arshad Khan, director of Mosaic International South Asian Film Festival; Michael Barry, content development and operations at Cineplex Entertainment; Sara Saljoughi, assistant Pprofessor of English and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto; and Scarborough native Steven Hoffner, an award winning director.

The 22-year-old Harris’ Fatherhood had already been screened at the Canada International Film Festival earlier this year where the film won the Royal Reel Award.

The documentary paints the portrait of a young father and examines the role childhood plays in a man’s ability to parent, said Harris.

The Trip centres on the relationship between a mother and daughter during a transformative road trip to Tobermory, ON.

“The idea for the film was triggered by my own experience with my mother on a similar trip. I wanted to study two people and how they come to a better understanding of themselves and of each other,” said Wang.

The short film was originally pitched at the Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival during its So You Think You Can Pitch event.

An award winning film maker at 32 years-old, Wang was not always so sure of her passion for film making. Before she fell in love with film, Wang was a pre-med student until she became interested in law.

She graduated from law school and worked as a representative for refugees who face deportation. After deciding that law was not the career for her, she wanted to do something that would combine her love for diversity, film and writing.

“I never felt more grounded or more connected to myself than when I was making my first film. That’s how I knew this was what I wanted to do,” Wang said.

The Trip was filmed, acted and made completely by women of colour, she said.

“I think that in itself is a statement and it should be celebrated,” said Wang.

Wang was 11-years-old when she arrived on Canadian soil and her struggles as a woman and an immigrant inform the stories she tells through film.

“There are certain things I want to say in the world and diversity is a part of humanity that is underrepresented,” said Wang.

Film Fatherhood takes award at Scarborough Worldwide Film Festival

Grace Wang’s The Trip wins Audience Choice Award

News Jun 15, 2015 by Sam Juric Scarborough Mirror

The reel of award winners for the Scarborough Worldwide Film Festival has been announced.

The festival screened 15 international films from 10 countries spanning five continents. The festival was also a juried competition.

Although the festival showcased international talent in the world of film everything was coming up Toronto. The documentary film Fatherhood, directed by Scarborough’s Alicia Harris, won for Best Short Film.

The Trip, directed by Grace Wang who grew up in Parkdale, won the Audience Choice Award for Best Short Film.

The jury committee included Arshad Khan, director of Mosaic International South Asian Film Festival; Michael Barry, content development and operations at Cineplex Entertainment; Sara Saljoughi, assistant Pprofessor of English and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto; and Scarborough native Steven Hoffner, an award winning director.

The 22-year-old Harris’ Fatherhood had already been screened at the Canada International Film Festival earlier this year where the film won the Royal Reel Award.

The documentary paints the portrait of a young father and examines the role childhood plays in a man’s ability to parent, said Harris.

The Trip centres on the relationship between a mother and daughter during a transformative road trip to Tobermory, ON.

“The idea for the film was triggered by my own experience with my mother on a similar trip. I wanted to study two people and how they come to a better understanding of themselves and of each other,” said Wang.

The short film was originally pitched at the Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival during its So You Think You Can Pitch event.

An award winning film maker at 32 years-old, Wang was not always so sure of her passion for film making. Before she fell in love with film, Wang was a pre-med student until she became interested in law.

She graduated from law school and worked as a representative for refugees who face deportation. After deciding that law was not the career for her, she wanted to do something that would combine her love for diversity, film and writing.

“I never felt more grounded or more connected to myself than when I was making my first film. That’s how I knew this was what I wanted to do,” Wang said.

The Trip was filmed, acted and made completely by women of colour, she said.

“I think that in itself is a statement and it should be celebrated,” said Wang.

Wang was 11-years-old when she arrived on Canadian soil and her struggles as a woman and an immigrant inform the stories she tells through film.

“There are certain things I want to say in the world and diversity is a part of humanity that is underrepresented,” said Wang.