CRC open house showcases services

News May 08, 2015 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A year after celebrating its 50th anniversary with an open house, the CRC invited the public in once again to showcase its many services and offerings on Thursday, May 7.

Known until a couple of years ago as the Christian Resource Centre, the CRC offers housing, food, clothing and other support, social opportunities and other services for many in the Regent Park community.

“This is our second annual and it’s something I think we’re going to do every year,” said CRC Development Manager Bruce Voogd. “This is a changing neighbourhood and the ratio of rent-geared-to-income to market rate (housing) (is) going to continue to shift. We want to keep showing people what we do.”

While the CRC has long provided meal programs, housing assistance and more, its programs have expanded since it moved into a new facility, at 40 Oak St., following that building’s completion in 2012.

The CRC has also partnered with Community Food Centres Canada to boost its meal and food program options.

Last year’s opening of Regent Park – a park space in the community for which it is named – fostered even more opportunities for programming.

“We’ve got five community gardens in the neighbourhood now, and the one at the park is our newest one,” said Emily Martyn, community food centre manager at the Regent Park Community Food Centre at CRC. “There’s a bake oven opening in the park on June 6 and we’ll be making good use of that.”

The Regent Park Community Food Centre at the CRC offers a community kitchen complete with cooking classes, community gardening programs, meal programs for those in the community and more.

“We started a bunch of new programs in the winter,” Martyn said. “We started a seniors’ community kitchen and we partnered with Egale Canada to invite a group of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi and transgender) youth into our kitchen for food skills training. We’re also partnering with Street Health on a new community kitchen program that focuses on harm reduction and liver health.”

For many living in Regent Park and the surrounding neighbourhoods, the CRC’s programs serve as much-needed supports, from the clothing drop-in and shower and laundry services to art therapy to food security initiatives to 87 deeply affordable housing units.

The CRC is also home to Inspired Souls, a musical group made up of people who use the CRC’s services. That group performed at the CRC open house May 7.

“The people who use our services have skills, as you can see through Inspired Souls, which we call our house band,” Voogd said. “They’re just people who have had something happen to them in life, whether that’s mental illness, addiction, the death of a family member or a physical injury, and we’re here to give them opportunities.”

For more information on the CRC and the multitude of services it provides, including links to volunteer opportunities with the community garden and other initiatives, visit www.tcrc.ca

CRC open house showcases services

News May 08, 2015 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A year after celebrating its 50th anniversary with an open house, the CRC invited the public in once again to showcase its many services and offerings on Thursday, May 7.

Known until a couple of years ago as the Christian Resource Centre, the CRC offers housing, food, clothing and other support, social opportunities and other services for many in the Regent Park community.

“This is our second annual and it’s something I think we’re going to do every year,” said CRC Development Manager Bruce Voogd. “This is a changing neighbourhood and the ratio of rent-geared-to-income to market rate (housing) (is) going to continue to shift. We want to keep showing people what we do.”

While the CRC has long provided meal programs, housing assistance and more, its programs have expanded since it moved into a new facility, at 40 Oak St., following that building’s completion in 2012.

The CRC has also partnered with Community Food Centres Canada to boost its meal and food program options.

Last year’s opening of Regent Park – a park space in the community for which it is named – fostered even more opportunities for programming.

“We’ve got five community gardens in the neighbourhood now, and the one at the park is our newest one,” said Emily Martyn, community food centre manager at the Regent Park Community Food Centre at CRC. “There’s a bake oven opening in the park on June 6 and we’ll be making good use of that.”

The Regent Park Community Food Centre at the CRC offers a community kitchen complete with cooking classes, community gardening programs, meal programs for those in the community and more.

“We started a bunch of new programs in the winter,” Martyn said. “We started a seniors’ community kitchen and we partnered with Egale Canada to invite a group of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi and transgender) youth into our kitchen for food skills training. We’re also partnering with Street Health on a new community kitchen program that focuses on harm reduction and liver health.”

For many living in Regent Park and the surrounding neighbourhoods, the CRC’s programs serve as much-needed supports, from the clothing drop-in and shower and laundry services to art therapy to food security initiatives to 87 deeply affordable housing units.

The CRC is also home to Inspired Souls, a musical group made up of people who use the CRC’s services. That group performed at the CRC open house May 7.

“The people who use our services have skills, as you can see through Inspired Souls, which we call our house band,” Voogd said. “They’re just people who have had something happen to them in life, whether that’s mental illness, addiction, the death of a family member or a physical injury, and we’re here to give them opportunities.”

For more information on the CRC and the multitude of services it provides, including links to volunteer opportunities with the community garden and other initiatives, visit www.tcrc.ca

CRC open house showcases services

News May 08, 2015 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A year after celebrating its 50th anniversary with an open house, the CRC invited the public in once again to showcase its many services and offerings on Thursday, May 7.

Known until a couple of years ago as the Christian Resource Centre, the CRC offers housing, food, clothing and other support, social opportunities and other services for many in the Regent Park community.

“This is our second annual and it’s something I think we’re going to do every year,” said CRC Development Manager Bruce Voogd. “This is a changing neighbourhood and the ratio of rent-geared-to-income to market rate (housing) (is) going to continue to shift. We want to keep showing people what we do.”

While the CRC has long provided meal programs, housing assistance and more, its programs have expanded since it moved into a new facility, at 40 Oak St., following that building’s completion in 2012.

The CRC has also partnered with Community Food Centres Canada to boost its meal and food program options.

Last year’s opening of Regent Park – a park space in the community for which it is named – fostered even more opportunities for programming.

“We’ve got five community gardens in the neighbourhood now, and the one at the park is our newest one,” said Emily Martyn, community food centre manager at the Regent Park Community Food Centre at CRC. “There’s a bake oven opening in the park on June 6 and we’ll be making good use of that.”

The Regent Park Community Food Centre at the CRC offers a community kitchen complete with cooking classes, community gardening programs, meal programs for those in the community and more.

“We started a bunch of new programs in the winter,” Martyn said. “We started a seniors’ community kitchen and we partnered with Egale Canada to invite a group of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi and transgender) youth into our kitchen for food skills training. We’re also partnering with Street Health on a new community kitchen program that focuses on harm reduction and liver health.”

For many living in Regent Park and the surrounding neighbourhoods, the CRC’s programs serve as much-needed supports, from the clothing drop-in and shower and laundry services to art therapy to food security initiatives to 87 deeply affordable housing units.

The CRC is also home to Inspired Souls, a musical group made up of people who use the CRC’s services. That group performed at the CRC open house May 7.

“The people who use our services have skills, as you can see through Inspired Souls, which we call our house band,” Voogd said. “They’re just people who have had something happen to them in life, whether that’s mental illness, addiction, the death of a family member or a physical injury, and we’re here to give them opportunities.”

For more information on the CRC and the multitude of services it provides, including links to volunteer opportunities with the community garden and other initiatives, visit www.tcrc.ca