Workplace deaths remembered at National Day of Mourning ceremony in High Park

News Apr 28, 2015 by Lisa Rainford Beach Mirror

Mere steps from where two workers died in workplace accidents at a condominium construction site, hundreds of people gathered in their memory as part of the National Day of Mourning.

In March, bricklayers Luigi Cudini and Shane Jennings died while working on the condominium project at High Park Avenue and Bloor Street West. In commemoration of these men, The National Day of Mourning ceremony was held across from the building on the edge of High Park, Tuesday, April 28.

The annual event, which serves to ‘Mourn the dead’ and ‘Fight for the Living,’ brought together the likes of Mayor John Tory, John Cartright, president of the Toronto & York Region Labour Council, Tom Parkin of the Workers Health & Safety Centre as well as local politicians Councillor Sarah Doucette, MPP Cheri DiNovo, and MP Peggy Nash, as well as members of Unifor and United Steelworkers unions, among others.

The latest statistics from 2013 indicate there were 902 workplace deaths in Canada – “that’s three deaths every day,” pointed out Parkin.

In April, new regulations were put into place to ensure workers take education courses to learn how to wear the proper safety equipment.

“I heard construction workers say ‘I worked for 20 years on scaffolding and I didn’t know that was the right clip to use in that situation,’” Parkin told his audience who had gathered Tuesday. “This kind of thing saves lives.”

The National Day of Mourning, acknowledged every year on April 28, was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after the day of remembrance was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress.

The Day of Mourning is now recognized by as many as 80 countries worldwide.

Welcoming so many people to her neighbourhood, Doucette said she wished it was under different circumstances. She said she and her constituents could not believe such a tragedy happened so close to home.

“We’ll make sure nothing like this happens in this community,” Doucette said.

The mayor, who said he rides the subway to work alongside many who work on downtown construction sites and has listened to their plight, brought a signed proclamation by city council acknowledging National Day of Mourning.

“It’s not just for construction workers, it’s everyone from different occupations,” he said.

Offering her condolences to the families who lost loved ones, Nash, a one-time top negotiator for Canada’s largest private-sector union, said tougher health and safety regulations are needed.

“We have to mourn the dead, but we have to fight like hell for the living,” she said.

The ceremony also commemorated William Cerqueira who recently died at a construction site downtown, as well as Mark Attallah, who was killed in a crane accident in Brampton.

Workplace deaths remembered at National Day of Mourning ceremony in High Park

Politicians, unions, workers gathered near construction site where two bricklayers were killed in March

News Apr 28, 2015 by Lisa Rainford Beach Mirror

Mere steps from where two workers died in workplace accidents at a condominium construction site, hundreds of people gathered in their memory as part of the National Day of Mourning.

In March, bricklayers Luigi Cudini and Shane Jennings died while working on the condominium project at High Park Avenue and Bloor Street West. In commemoration of these men, The National Day of Mourning ceremony was held across from the building on the edge of High Park, Tuesday, April 28.

The annual event, which serves to ‘Mourn the dead’ and ‘Fight for the Living,’ brought together the likes of Mayor John Tory, John Cartright, president of the Toronto & York Region Labour Council, Tom Parkin of the Workers Health & Safety Centre as well as local politicians Councillor Sarah Doucette, MPP Cheri DiNovo, and MP Peggy Nash, as well as members of Unifor and United Steelworkers unions, among others.

The latest statistics from 2013 indicate there were 902 workplace deaths in Canada – “that’s three deaths every day,” pointed out Parkin.

In April, new regulations were put into place to ensure workers take education courses to learn how to wear the proper safety equipment.

“I heard construction workers say ‘I worked for 20 years on scaffolding and I didn’t know that was the right clip to use in that situation,’” Parkin told his audience who had gathered Tuesday. “This kind of thing saves lives.”

The National Day of Mourning, acknowledged every year on April 28, was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after the day of remembrance was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress.

The Day of Mourning is now recognized by as many as 80 countries worldwide.

Welcoming so many people to her neighbourhood, Doucette said she wished it was under different circumstances. She said she and her constituents could not believe such a tragedy happened so close to home.

“We’ll make sure nothing like this happens in this community,” Doucette said.

The mayor, who said he rides the subway to work alongside many who work on downtown construction sites and has listened to their plight, brought a signed proclamation by city council acknowledging National Day of Mourning.

“It’s not just for construction workers, it’s everyone from different occupations,” he said.

Offering her condolences to the families who lost loved ones, Nash, a one-time top negotiator for Canada’s largest private-sector union, said tougher health and safety regulations are needed.

“We have to mourn the dead, but we have to fight like hell for the living,” she said.

The ceremony also commemorated William Cerqueira who recently died at a construction site downtown, as well as Mark Attallah, who was killed in a crane accident in Brampton.

Workplace deaths remembered at National Day of Mourning ceremony in High Park

Politicians, unions, workers gathered near construction site where two bricklayers were killed in March

News Apr 28, 2015 by Lisa Rainford Beach Mirror

Mere steps from where two workers died in workplace accidents at a condominium construction site, hundreds of people gathered in their memory as part of the National Day of Mourning.

In March, bricklayers Luigi Cudini and Shane Jennings died while working on the condominium project at High Park Avenue and Bloor Street West. In commemoration of these men, The National Day of Mourning ceremony was held across from the building on the edge of High Park, Tuesday, April 28.

The annual event, which serves to ‘Mourn the dead’ and ‘Fight for the Living,’ brought together the likes of Mayor John Tory, John Cartright, president of the Toronto & York Region Labour Council, Tom Parkin of the Workers Health & Safety Centre as well as local politicians Councillor Sarah Doucette, MPP Cheri DiNovo, and MP Peggy Nash, as well as members of Unifor and United Steelworkers unions, among others.

The latest statistics from 2013 indicate there were 902 workplace deaths in Canada – “that’s three deaths every day,” pointed out Parkin.

In April, new regulations were put into place to ensure workers take education courses to learn how to wear the proper safety equipment.

“I heard construction workers say ‘I worked for 20 years on scaffolding and I didn’t know that was the right clip to use in that situation,’” Parkin told his audience who had gathered Tuesday. “This kind of thing saves lives.”

The National Day of Mourning, acknowledged every year on April 28, was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after the day of remembrance was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress.

The Day of Mourning is now recognized by as many as 80 countries worldwide.

Welcoming so many people to her neighbourhood, Doucette said she wished it was under different circumstances. She said she and her constituents could not believe such a tragedy happened so close to home.

“We’ll make sure nothing like this happens in this community,” Doucette said.

The mayor, who said he rides the subway to work alongside many who work on downtown construction sites and has listened to their plight, brought a signed proclamation by city council acknowledging National Day of Mourning.

“It’s not just for construction workers, it’s everyone from different occupations,” he said.

Offering her condolences to the families who lost loved ones, Nash, a one-time top negotiator for Canada’s largest private-sector union, said tougher health and safety regulations are needed.

“We have to mourn the dead, but we have to fight like hell for the living,” she said.

The ceremony also commemorated William Cerqueira who recently died at a construction site downtown, as well as Mark Attallah, who was killed in a crane accident in Brampton.