New downtown restaurant b.good partners with Regent Park Community Food Centre

News Feb 19, 2015 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A new restaurant in downtown Toronto promises to practice what it preaches.

The Front Street eatery, dubbed b.good, is giving customers a chance to share rewards with those in need.

As with other b.good locations – there are 20 of them in the United States – the restaurant has a charitable partner. The Front Street site has selected the Regent Park Community Food Centre (CFC), which helps promote food security and education for those at risk.

“Everyone gets a QR code for special gifts and rewards, and they can use those gifts or they can pass them along,” said b.good Canada president Todd Brooks. “By partnering with the Regent Park Community Food Centre, it lets people give their food gifts to somebody else who can use it more.”

The Regent Park CFC opened in late 2013 at the site of the CRC – formerly the Christian Resource Centre – at 40 Oak Street. It provides community meals, food advocacy, gardening programming and food skills training to those in the community.

Brooks said b.good decided to partner with the Regent Park Community Food Centre after meeting with Nick Saul of Community Food Centres Canada and learning more about food empowerment. He and his team got to know suppliers in the Ontario food business.

“We look to source all the ingredients for our food locally, supporting local farmers and businesses,” Brooks said. “Our farmers have their pictures on our tables and around our store so our customers can learn more about who they are and what they do.”

The meat and vegetables used at b.good come from Ontario farmers, while the bread for sandwiches comes from Silverstein’s Bakery on McCaul Street and the ice cream used in milkshakes comes from Toronto-based Greg’s Ice Cream.

“One of (the chain’s) early investors grew up in Mississauga and told us Toronto cares more than most markets about locally-sourced food,” Brooks said.

He added by partnering with the Regent Park Community Food Centre, it adds another angle to the restaurant’s local ties.

“We want to deepen our relationship with them,” he said. “At some point, we want to have our crew go over there with some of our ingredients and just cook and talk with the people there.”

To learn more about the Regent Park Community Food Centre, visit http://cfccanada.ca/regent-park-cfc

For more information on b.good, visit www.bgood.ca

New downtown restaurant b.good partners with Regent Park Community Food Centre

News Feb 19, 2015 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A new restaurant in downtown Toronto promises to practice what it preaches.

The Front Street eatery, dubbed b.good, is giving customers a chance to share rewards with those in need.

As with other b.good locations – there are 20 of them in the United States – the restaurant has a charitable partner. The Front Street site has selected the Regent Park Community Food Centre (CFC), which helps promote food security and education for those at risk.

“Everyone gets a QR code for special gifts and rewards, and they can use those gifts or they can pass them along,” said b.good Canada president Todd Brooks. “By partnering with the Regent Park Community Food Centre, it lets people give their food gifts to somebody else who can use it more.”

The Regent Park CFC opened in late 2013 at the site of the CRC – formerly the Christian Resource Centre – at 40 Oak Street. It provides community meals, food advocacy, gardening programming and food skills training to those in the community.

Brooks said b.good decided to partner with the Regent Park Community Food Centre after meeting with Nick Saul of Community Food Centres Canada and learning more about food empowerment. He and his team got to know suppliers in the Ontario food business.

“We look to source all the ingredients for our food locally, supporting local farmers and businesses,” Brooks said. “Our farmers have their pictures on our tables and around our store so our customers can learn more about who they are and what they do.”

The meat and vegetables used at b.good come from Ontario farmers, while the bread for sandwiches comes from Silverstein’s Bakery on McCaul Street and the ice cream used in milkshakes comes from Toronto-based Greg’s Ice Cream.

“One of (the chain’s) early investors grew up in Mississauga and told us Toronto cares more than most markets about locally-sourced food,” Brooks said.

He added by partnering with the Regent Park Community Food Centre, it adds another angle to the restaurant’s local ties.

“We want to deepen our relationship with them,” he said. “At some point, we want to have our crew go over there with some of our ingredients and just cook and talk with the people there.”

To learn more about the Regent Park Community Food Centre, visit http://cfccanada.ca/regent-park-cfc

For more information on b.good, visit www.bgood.ca

New downtown restaurant b.good partners with Regent Park Community Food Centre

News Feb 19, 2015 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A new restaurant in downtown Toronto promises to practice what it preaches.

The Front Street eatery, dubbed b.good, is giving customers a chance to share rewards with those in need.

As with other b.good locations – there are 20 of them in the United States – the restaurant has a charitable partner. The Front Street site has selected the Regent Park Community Food Centre (CFC), which helps promote food security and education for those at risk.

“Everyone gets a QR code for special gifts and rewards, and they can use those gifts or they can pass them along,” said b.good Canada president Todd Brooks. “By partnering with the Regent Park Community Food Centre, it lets people give their food gifts to somebody else who can use it more.”

The Regent Park CFC opened in late 2013 at the site of the CRC – formerly the Christian Resource Centre – at 40 Oak Street. It provides community meals, food advocacy, gardening programming and food skills training to those in the community.

Brooks said b.good decided to partner with the Regent Park Community Food Centre after meeting with Nick Saul of Community Food Centres Canada and learning more about food empowerment. He and his team got to know suppliers in the Ontario food business.

“We look to source all the ingredients for our food locally, supporting local farmers and businesses,” Brooks said. “Our farmers have their pictures on our tables and around our store so our customers can learn more about who they are and what they do.”

The meat and vegetables used at b.good come from Ontario farmers, while the bread for sandwiches comes from Silverstein’s Bakery on McCaul Street and the ice cream used in milkshakes comes from Toronto-based Greg’s Ice Cream.

“One of (the chain’s) early investors grew up in Mississauga and told us Toronto cares more than most markets about locally-sourced food,” Brooks said.

He added by partnering with the Regent Park Community Food Centre, it adds another angle to the restaurant’s local ties.

“We want to deepen our relationship with them,” he said. “At some point, we want to have our crew go over there with some of our ingredients and just cook and talk with the people there.”

To learn more about the Regent Park Community Food Centre, visit http://cfccanada.ca/regent-park-cfc

For more information on b.good, visit www.bgood.ca